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OPINION
March 6, 2006
With a wave of his magic pen and one shallow paragraph worth of history, Jonah Goldberg has decreed America's black-white race relations solved by the 9/11 tragedy (Opinion, March 2). Additionally, Goldberg flippantly writes: "President Bush's decision to drop quotas as a reliable GOP punching bag cooled tempers, too." That The Times gives so much space to this caliber of thinking flies in the face of recent realities, such as the Hurricane Katrina tragedy, which not only exposed the reality of poor black America and the state of "black and white" inequalities, it equally exposed the Jonah Goldbergs and their intelligence-insulting commentaries.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1985
Bravo to Ted Vollmer on his article, "Anti-AIDS Forces Fire at Supervisors," and bravo to Bruce Decker, co-chairperson of the AIDS Advisory Committee. Vollmer's article brought me a mixture of emotions. I felt livid at the incredible ignorance and tunnel vision of elected officials such as Schabarum. However, I also felt excessively elated at Dr. Martin Roth's statement, that anyone who thinks that the purpose of the educational pamphlets, regarding drug use, was to promote drug use, "is a fool"!
BUSINESS
August 17, 2003
As someone who is asthmatic and smoke sensitive, I want to know how the new "Whoopi" show is going to portray the "realistic" consequences of exposing people to secondhand smoke ("Whoopi Ignites Furor," Aug. 4). Are the producers going to show someone with asthma going to the emergency room after exposure to Whoopi's smoke? Are the producers going to show someone with emphysema on oxygen, sitting in a chair because he or she is too exhausted to walk from being exposed to Whoopi's smoke?
NEWS
May 29, 1991
I see where Dianne Klein is making another attempt to write about something more serious than her usual social dabblings. Generally speaking, a public school teacher has the right to present both the "evolutionary theory" of biology and the "purposeful design," or what Klein cynically refers to as "creationism." Peloza also has the right to express his personal preferance, especially if asked. There is "scientific evidence" for and against both of them. By the same token, a student has the right to express an opinion--but not the right to libel or slander someone, including a teacher.
OPINION
March 31, 2005
The March 29 article, "Justices Refuse to Shield Reports of False Charges," portends a major setback for freedom of the press. A reporter is just that, a reporter of events that occur in our country or town or to our people and politicians around the world. If somebody says something, it is in fact said, regardless of whether that statement in itself is true or false. To punish a reporter for reporting any statement that has in fact been said is the real crime and goes against the basic premise of our vaunted and essential freedom of the press in this country.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1989 | LAURIE OCHOA
You can't help but notice it when you walk into the dimly lit dining room. Its bright lights and shiny surfaces seen through tinted glass cast an eerie glow; like the blue-gray flicker of a TV set in a darkened living room, it demands to be watched. Those who have heard about the half-million dollar price tag attached to this kitchen can ogle knowingly at the expanse of stainless steel--on burner hoods, on counter sides, even on the ceiling. Also on display: the chefs. One tends the flames of a steak on the grill, another stands watch over sauces on the burners.
NATIONAL
January 7, 2007 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
She grew up in a single-parent home in the working-class suburb of Tuxedo, Md. She got pregnant at age 14, dropped out of high school, and at 15 married the father. By 18 she was divorced and working two jobs -- secretary by day, waitress at night. Now 39, Cathy L. Lanier began her new job last week as acting police chief of Washington, one of a handful of women to head large-city departments in the U.S. and one of only a few white officers to lead forces in largely black cities.
SPORTS
February 24, 1995 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Greg Louganis hit his head on the diving board and spilled his blood into the pool at the 1988 Olympic Games, did he have an obligation to disclose to doctors who treated him and to other athletes using the pool that he was HIV-positive?
WORLD
September 16, 2013 | By Tom Kington
GIGLIO, Italy - Twenty months after it capsized off the Italian coast in a disaster that killed 32 people, the Costa Concordia cruise ship emerged from the Mediterranean on Monday thanks to a painstaking $800-million salvage effort. Fifty-six giant pulleys slowly heaved the half-submerged vessel back to an upright position in a 19-hour operation that went into the early hours of Tuesday, revealing a section of hull darkened by rust and algae during months underwater. "The rotation has finished its course, we are at zero degrees, the ship is resting on the platforms," said Italy's civil protection chief, Franco Gabrielli, at a 4 a.m. news conference on Giglio island, where he was applauded and cheered by residents.
NEWS
November 29, 1993 | GARRY BOULARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hidden from view in a bucolic grove about 20 miles from Baton Rouge, La., the only operating leper colony in the continental United States has been Jose Azaharez's home for a quarter of a century. "This is all I have in the whole world," said Azaharez, a former welterweight boxer from Cuba who was diagnosed with the disease in the 1950s and is now marginally disfigured. "If I had to leave here, where would I go? Who would I stay with? This is the only home I know."
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