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NEWS
January 21, 2012 | By Megan Garvey
As Newt Gingrich took the stage Saturday in South Carolina to the cheers of enthusiastic supporters, tweets about him rose sharply, as did expressions of shock, according to an analysis by San Francisco-based Kanjoya. “If Barack Obama can get reelected after this disaster, just think how radical he would be in a second term,” Gingrich said. Gingrich's victory and his words afterward took many people by surprise, Kanjoya reported. Its engineers found tweets such as: "You never know what will happen until it does.
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SPORTS
April 26, 2014 | By Nathan Fenno
Vitriol toward Clippers owner Donald Sterling surged through social media Saturday as outrage over his alleged racist comments in an audio recording found a home in tweets, Facebook posts and Instagram snapshots. The anger, usually attached to the fast-growing #DonaldSterling and #BoycottClippers hashtags, crossed the nation. It united hard-core basketball fans and sports neophytes, celebrities and everyday people, young and old in their condemnation of the 80-year-old Sterling. They wondered how he could remain owner.
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SCIENCE
March 20, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Why do our eyes open wide when we feel fear or narrow to slits when we express disgust? According to new research, it has to do with survival. In a paper published Thursday in the journal Psychological Science, researchers concluded that expressions of fear and disgust altered the way human eyes gather and focus light. They argued that these changes were the result of evolutionary development and were intended to help humans survive, or at least detect, very different threats.
BUSINESS
April 9, 2014 | By Chad Terhune and Doug Smith
Newport Beach oncologist Minh Nguyen woke up Wednesday wearing a dubious distinction: Medicare's highest-paid doctor in California and one of the top physicians nationwide. Some of his patients and fellow physicians immediately called him wanting an explanation of why newly released federal data show he got paid $11.3 million for treating Medicare patients in 2012. Like dozens of other doctors across the country, Nguyen was unwittingly thrust into the spotlight as federal officials listed for the first time what the government pays individual doctors to treat elderly Americans.
NEWS
April 17, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
If you were to travel anywhere in the globe -- even to visit remote tribes who have scant contact with the larger world -- would people be able to read your emotions from your facial expressions (happiness, sadness, disgust, etc.) and would you be able to read theirs? In other words, do people smile when they're happy, wrinkle their noses when disgusted, the world over? Scientists have long thought so, but authors of a new study challenge the idea. Charles Darwin argued in “The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals” that basic facial expressions are universal -- implying that are hard-wired within us, the product of natural selection.
NEWS
August 18, 1991
Garry Abrams' article raises an important set of issues but fails to adequately sort them out. I too am frightened by the prospect of an erosion of the separation of church and state, but I am equally concerned about the policing of personal faith in public work settings. Clearly one person's religious beliefs can not be allowed to infringe upon the free expression of another's, but neither can the state be allowed to censor individual belief. A world in which individual conscience is regulated--you are fired because we don't like the way your faith influences your politics--is precisely the world that the separation of church and state seeks to avoid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1994
Your editorial "2 Issues Inflame Tensions at CSUN" (Sept. 25) suggests that Cal State Northridge should have delayed a much-needed reorganization of our Educational Opportunity Program by referring the issue to a committee. You agreed the changes are needed; you note correctly that we had already laid the groundwork for the changes. What seemed to disturb you is the fact that the students protested. One would think that The Times would be a little bit bolder in its understanding and tolerance of dissent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1988
I will never, ever, vote for a politician who uses in a speech the most unappetizing of all the current "cute" expressions, "Read my lips." MARCIA EDWARDS Orange
OPINION
December 19, 2012 | By Emrys Westacott
Would you give a friend or family member an item of used clothing as a Christmas gift? I put this question to two of my colleagues. They both saw it as a no-brainer. "Sure," said one. "My mom and I do it all the time. " "No way," said the other. "That's really tacky. " Aha, I thought. Here's work for an ethicist with psychoanalytic tendencies. So, is there anything wrong with secondhand gifts? The question is timely, given the state of the economy. And the argument for giving used items as gifts is obvious.
SPORTS
October 14, 2000
When asked why DeShaun Foster wasn't suspended after a misdemeanor marijuana conviction, Coach Bob Toledo said, "He was guilty of having it. He wasn't guilty of using it." That's about as funny as Clinton's "I didn't inhale." I don't give much credence to coaches' expressions on morality and ethics. Still, I think Coach Toledo should have made more of an effort. TITUS J. SANTELLI Van Nuys
SPORTS
March 29, 2014 | By Bill Shaikin
Hanley Ramirez has entered his walk year. Ramirez and Dodgers Chairman Mark Walter each expressed interest in completing a contract extension eight months ago, but the two sides have not reached a deal, and Ramirez can file for free agency after the season. Ramirez could be the premier position player available in free agency, if he gets there, when contract values for star players are escalating rapidly. The other top position players eligible to hit the market appear to be fellow infielders Chase Headley of the San Diego Padres and Pablo Sandoval of the San Francisco Giants.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2014 | By Susan King
Kurtwood Smith turned the image of the sitcom dad on its ear in the raucous Fox sitcom "That '70s Show" as Red Forman, the tough-nosed war vet father of Eric (Topher Grace). Red was the antithesis of such sweater-clad warm-and-fuzzy TV dads as Ozzie Nelson on "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet" and Bill Cosby on "The Cosby Show. " In fact, Red was more Tasmanian devil than teddy bear. He loved his power tools, drinking beer, hunting and fishing. Red was known for his pungent put-downs of his son: "What are you going to put on your resume?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2014 | By Amy Kaufman
LAS VEGAS -- Nearly all of Hollywood has come aboard the digital bandwagon, but at least one influential filmmaker still isn't sold on the new format. At CinemaCon on Wednesday, Christopher Nolan said he still feels film is the “best way” to capture and project an image -- even at a time when virtually all theaters have converted to showing movies digitally. “I'm a fan of any technological innovation, but for me, it's going to have to exceed what came before -- and it hasn't yet,” Nolan told a crowd of exhibitors at the annual industry conference.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | Sandy Banks
How do you help little children, too young to know what death really means, cope with the feelings of grief and pain that the loss of a loved one brings? If you're music therapist Arvis Jones, you let them bang on a drum, do the hokey-pokey or join a choir and sing. Jones is part of a growing professional field that taps the restorative power of music to help traumatized children heal. For 20 years, she's been going to crime scenes, hospitals, funerals and schools, reaching out to grieving families with a bin of unorthodox tools - keyboards, claves, jingle sticks, tambourines, djembe and tubano drums.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2014 | By Jessica Garrison
One year after the South Coast Air Quality Management District found that arsenic emissions from a Vernon battery plant posed a cancer risk to more than 100,000 people, the agency has approved Exide Technologies Inc.'s plan to reduce health risks. Exide issued a statement saying it had "worked diligently" with regulators and intends to invest more than $5 million in the facility as a result of the new plan, on top of $15 million the company has already spent or pledged for other environmental and public health-related improvements since 2010.
SCIENCE
March 20, 2014 | By Monte Morin
Why do our eyes open wide when we feel fear or narrow to slits when we express disgust? According to new research, it has to do with survival. In a paper published Thursday in the journal Psychological Science, researchers concluded that expressions of fear and disgust altered the way human eyes gather and focus light. They argued that these changes were the result of evolutionary development and were intended to help humans survive, or at least detect, very different threats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1992
Remarks attributed to Schott epitomize the concepts my dear mother taught me to oppose, more than 60 years ago. I have always done so. Yet must everyone connected with sports--or any other pursuit--conform to the same beliefs? A cornerstone of democracy is the right to disagree, even if disgustingly. America will, in the long run, support democratic ideas. Our nation progresses by being able to hear all expressions, and to go forward based on the better ones. Let's not endanger our heritage of free speech by muzzling anyone--not even this apparently retrogressive lady.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1985
"The face of man is the index to joy and mirth, to severity and sadness." That was the observation of Pliny the Elder, 19 centuries ago. Now comes Paul Eckman, a professor of psychiatry at UC San Francisco, to announce to a meeting of the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science that "you become what you put on your face." Eckman's summation may lack some of Pliny's elegance, but it does provide a useful insight into how emotions can be manipulated.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
With business travel spending expected to rise this year, American Express Co. announced plans to sell half its business travel division and create a separate venture. American Express will give up 50% ownership of its global business travel division in exchange for an investment of $900 million from a group led by New York investment firm Certares. The ownership will be shared with Certares, Qatar Investment Authority, BlackRock and Macquarie Capital, according to American Express.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2014 | David Lazarus
How much should public entities spend trying to collect a charge that runs only a few cents? Lawmakers might want to sit up and take note. Maybe, just maybe, it would make sense to waive charges any time collection of cash costs more than the amount of cash being collected. Bruce and Pat West were driving recently on the 110 Freeway near the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. They merged into the express lane, for which they didn't have a FasTrak transponder in their car to pay the requisite toll.
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