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Expulsions

NEWS
September 17, 1985 | TYLER MARSHALL, Times Staff Writer
Britain's relations with the Soviet Union plummeted to their lowest point in more than a decade Monday as Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's government accused six more Soviet citizens of spying and ordered them to leave the country. The British action followed intense consultations between Thatcher and senior Cabinet colleagues throughout much of the day. It marked the third salvo in what has become an unprecedented series of tit-for-tat expulsions between London and Moscow.
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NEWS
May 22, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Soviet Union said today it will sharply cut the number of British employees in Moscow in retaliation for the expulsions from Britain of 11 Soviets accused of espionage. Britain said on Sunday that it secretly ordered the expulsion of eight Soviet diplomats and three journalists on Friday. On Saturday, the Soviet Union retaliated with an identical set of expulsions of Britons. The Soviets took the diplomatic rift a step further today. Foreign Ministry spokesman Gennady I. Gerasimov told a news conference that the number of Britons accredited in Moscow and the number of Soviets working for Britons would be reduced from 375 to 205. The new limit for British employees would be equal to the number of Soviets now permitted to work in Britain.
NEWS
April 18, 1985 | Associated Press
The Foreign Office today ordered the expulsion of two Soviets--a diplomat and an employee of the Soviet airline Aeroflot--apparently for alleged espionage activities. The government said in a statement that Soviet Ambassador Viktor I. Popov was called in this morning and informed that the two men must leave within seven days. They were identified as Capt. Oleg A. Los, assistant naval attache at the embassy, and Vyacheslav A. Grigorov, a member of the London staff of Aeroflot.
NEWS
June 30, 1989 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Israel's government, which is under internal pressure to find a formula to end the Arab uprising, banished eight Palestinian activists to neighboring Lebanon on Thursday. The move defied criticism from Washington and human rights groups that assert such action violates international law. The eight were flown by helicopter to the northern edge of Israeli-controlled territory in southern Lebanon where they were given taxi money. The expulsions brought to 55 the number of Arabs forcibly sent abroad since the uprising began in December, 1987.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1993
Despite the consistently biased, anti-Israel United Nations and its Resolution 799 condemning the tiny Jewish democracy, and the efforts of the U.N.'s biased Egyptian secretary general to force Israel to tolerate internal terrorism by its Islamic/Arab enemies, all nations, including Israel, have the right by international law, moral law (even Hashemite law) and common sense, to deal with terrorists, murderers and all "internal enemies" as they deem necessary. Whether by lethal force, imprisonment or deportation.
SPORTS
March 16, 1999 | RANDY HARVEY
An International Olympic Committee member who remains in relatively good standing was chatting casually with reporters Monday in the lobby of the luxurious Palace Hotel when they told him they were awaiting an appearance by Jean-Claude Ganga. Ganga, of the Republic of Congo, is one of the Salt Lake City Six, members who have been recommended for expulsion for accepting payoffs of one kind or another during the city's successful bid for the 2002 Winter Games.
NEWS
January 25, 1987 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
Liu Binyan, one of China's leading writers, was formally expelled from the Communist Party on Saturday, and a Chinese source reported that authorities have placed him under guard or house arrest. Over the past eight years, Liu, 61, had written a series of novel-length works criticizing systemic local corruption within the Communist Party and the party's insistence on absolute obedience. In an official expulsion order, the party attacked Liu's writings.
NATIONAL
April 14, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The Navy expelled the former quarterback at the U.S. Naval Academy who was cleared of rape but found guilty of lesser offenses. Navy Secretary Donald C. Winter called Lamar Owens Jr.'s conduct "unsatisfactory" and ordered the 23-year-old to reimburse the school $90,797, or two-thirds of his education expenses. A military jury acquitted Owens in July of raping a female midshipman in her academy room in early 2006.
WORLD
April 22, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
France expelled a Muslim cleric to his native Algeria after he said that stoning and beating of adulterous wives were allowed by the Koran, even if French law prohibits them. Abdelkader Bouziane, 52, had lived in France since 1979 and had 16 children by two wives in the country, officials said.
WORLD
May 15, 2004 | From Associated Press
Brazil's government decided Friday not to revoke the visa of a New York Times reporter who wrote an article suggesting President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva had a drinking problem. The decision was made after lawyers for correspondent Larry Rohter wrote a letter to the government saying the article was not written to offend Lula.
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