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REAL ESTATE
July 5, 1987
Some USC students and Costa Mesa-based developer Westar Associates have signed their first tenant for a half-acre commercial project that the joint-venture team is planning in Desert Hot Springs. Southland Corp. has agreed to lease 3,055 square-feet of space in the project to operate a 7-Eleven convenience store, according to Ken Loesch, a USC student and the project's managing general partner.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 18, 2013 | Eric Sondheimer
When it comes to trendsetters, Thomas Hudnut will go down in history as the high school educator who proved students could excel in academics and athletics at the same time. As the headmaster when Studio City Harvard High School merged with the Westlake School for Girls in 1989 to become Harvard-Westlake, he decided to launch an all-out effort "to be as much like Stanford as we possibly could. " Sports was used to gain exposure and inspire a whole different element of students to consider Harvard-Westlake, known for its academic excellence.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1991 | From Associated Press
Although some vehemently opposed the law, 21 national educational and religious groups released guidelines this week to help schools abide by the Equal Access Act allowing high school religion clubs. Oliver Thomas of the Baptist Joint Committee and Charles Haynes, president of the National Council on Religion and Public Education, described the guidelines as a consensus reached over four months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2011 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
Those who knew Angela Gettis, the 16-year-old Washington Preparatory cheerleader who collapsed during a football game Friday and later died, said cheering was not just an extracurricular activity for her. It was her life. "There is nothing in the world she enjoyed more," Principal Todd Ullah said in a statement Monday, the first day of class after her death. Classmates said Angela brought that same vitality to the hallways of the South L.A. high school. She was vibrant, funny and always one of the brightest students in class.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1986 | BARRY S. SURMAN, Times Staff Writer
The school board voted unanimously Tuesday to open a small loophole in its policy that excludes borderline students from participating in extracurricular activities. Pressure from several students affected by the minimum-grade policy prompted both the revisions to that rule and the unusual special meeting at which the changes were passed, according to Sally Hoover, president of the Corona-Norco Unified School District's Board of Education.
NEWS
April 16, 1992 | Kirsten Lee Swartz, Times community correspondent
Schools across the Southland have had to trim millions of dollars from their budgets, increasing class size, and cutting nursing, library and bus services. In some districts, funds also were cut for after-school activities such as band, pep squads, debate and sports teams, choral music, and the school newspaper and yearbook. When school districts are forced to trim, should they try to save extracurricular activities? Kathy Klein, M ontebello Teachers Assn.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2010 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Like a seasoned television honcho, Oliver Bogner swivels in his plush office chair and reaches for a blank CD in a nearby cabinet. He just finished editing a video showcasing his latest reality show idea and it's ready to be copied and shipped to television networks. Now it's time for . . . homework? At 17, Bogner's list of extracurricular activities is hardly the average teenage fare. Sure, there's the customary position in student government. But then there are the conference calls with producers and network executives.
OPINION
June 28, 2002 | JONATHAN TURLEY, Jonathan Turley teaches constitutional law at George Washington University.
In a decision Thursday, the U.S. Supreme Court spoke directly to children who are interested in experimenting with drugs. The message is clear and simple: Focus all of your attention on drugs or face expulsion. This curious message is the product of a 5-4 ruling in Board of Education vs. Earls, in which the court upheld the right of high schools to compel drug testing of any student interested in extracurricular activities without any showing of individual suspicion of drug use.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2004 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
The candidate was unavailable, so 17-year-old Katie Bickert stood outside the statehouse last month delivering Dennis J. Kucinich's speech to mark National Homeless Memorial Day. Bickert -- who gravitated to Kucinich in part because "he's a cute little vegan" -- said she saw nothing out of the ordinary about a Concord High School junior subbing for a Democratic presidential hopeful. "Not around here," she said. That's because politics has become Concord High's hottest extracurricular activity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1990 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While universities around the country field football teams, Cal State San Marcos is trying to field a Rotary Club. While other campuses offer math clubs for super brains, Cal State San Marcos is thinking about forming a club for middle-aged students who fear math. While making it to editor of the college paper is a major honor at most schools, the newspaper serving Cal State San Marcos is co-edited by a student who doesn't attend the school.
WORLD
June 4, 2010 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
It was just a week after Chang Shui received her acceptance notice from Harvard that the first book offer came. A publisher approached her father with a detailed outline for an inside guide to how a Shanghai couple prepared their daughter to compete successfully with the best students from America. Local newspapers weighed in with articles about how Chang's membership in a dance troupe surely helped. "Magical girl 'danced' her way into Harvard," the Shanghai Evening Post headlined its story.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2010 | By Yvonne Villarreal
Like a seasoned television honcho, Oliver Bogner swivels in his plush office chair and reaches for a blank CD in a nearby cabinet. He just finished editing a video showcasing his latest reality show idea and it's ready to be copied and shipped to television networks. Now it's time for . . . homework? At 17, Bogner's list of extracurricular activities is hardly the average teenage fare. Sure, there's the customary position in student government. But then there are the conference calls with producers and network executives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2009 | Larry Gordon
The gray-and-green warehouse in suburban Concord seems an unlikely headquarters for a statewide detective operation, and the fact checkers at work there insist they are not mercilessly probing the lives of California's teenagers. Still, there is an element of hard-boiled sleuthing in the University of California's unusual attempt to ensure that its 98,000 freshman applicants tell the truth about themselves and their extracurricular activities.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2004 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
The candidate was unavailable, so 17-year-old Katie Bickert stood outside the statehouse last month delivering Dennis J. Kucinich's speech to mark National Homeless Memorial Day. Bickert -- who gravitated to Kucinich in part because "he's a cute little vegan" -- said she saw nothing out of the ordinary about a Concord High School junior subbing for a Democratic presidential hopeful. "Not around here," she said. That's because politics has become Concord High's hottest extracurricular activity.
OPINION
June 28, 2002 | JONATHAN TURLEY, Jonathan Turley teaches constitutional law at George Washington University.
In a decision Thursday, the U.S. Supreme Court spoke directly to children who are interested in experimenting with drugs. The message is clear and simple: Focus all of your attention on drugs or face expulsion. This curious message is the product of a 5-4 ruling in Board of Education vs. Earls, in which the court upheld the right of high schools to compel drug testing of any student interested in extracurricular activities without any showing of individual suspicion of drug use.
NEWS
November 9, 2001 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court agreed Thursday to decide whether all high school students who participate in extracurricular activities beyond sports can be forced to undergo random drug tests. A ruling on the issue, which can be expected by next spring, should clarify how far public school officials can go in requiring drug tests of students. The justices have said that students have lesser privacy rights than adults.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1990 | TONY MARCANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 200 parents, angered over stalled contract talks in the Ocean View School District, jammed a meeting of the district's board Tuesday night to voice concerns that their children are being ignored while negotiations drag on.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1991 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With six months to go before all 649 Los Angeles schools open their classrooms year-round, many questions remain about how the district plans to coordinate a range of academic and extracurricular activities. Administrators say they don't know how many schools will be able to offer special courses during the eight-week winter break that runs from late December into February for students at some schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1997 | TRACY JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Student organizers charged with whipping out the welcome mat for the incoming freshman at Cal State Dominguez Hills earlier this semester arranged for eight bands, seven deejays, a midget, a fire breather and a human pincushion to greet the new class. "We're not known as a sports or academic school, and we've got nothing to do out here," said senior Kyle Ellis. "So we want to be known as a party school so people will come here."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1996 | CHRIS DAVIS, Chris Davis is a teacher at Crescenta Valley High School in La Crescenta
As an avid runner and swimmer who has fond memories of four years of high school sports, I know that athletics builds character, teaches teamwork, fosters the work ethic and brings a sense of accomplishment. However, as a high school teacher, I know that sports has no monopoly on these values and skills. Unfortunately, athletics does possess an unhealthy monopoly on the resources and energy of many public high schools.
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