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Extradition Serbia

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February 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
Serbia pledged Thursday to expel or extradite non-Yugoslavs sought by the U.N. war crimes tribunal, meaning the Yugoslav republic may no longer be a haven for suspects from Bosnia and Croatia. The policy change by Serbia will have no impact on the status of former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic--top Serbian and Yugoslav leaders insist that he must stand trial at home, at least initially, for corruption and crimes related to atrocities in the Serbian province of Kosovo.
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WORLD
June 1, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
The man accused of overseeing the worst massacre of civilians in Europe since World War II was flown to The Hague on Tuesday for trial after judges rejected his argument that he was too frail to be extradited. Ratko Mladic, the former Bosnian Serb general, was bundled onto a plane in Belgrade, the Serbian capital, late Tuesday afternoon to face charges of genocide and crimes against humanity for his part in the savage ethnic cleansing campaigns of the 1992-95 Bosnian war. Mladic's lawyer had tried to prevent his transfer on the grounds that the onetime military commander, 69, had suffered at least two strokes and was too mentally clouded to stand trial.
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WORLD
June 1, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
The man accused of overseeing the worst massacre of civilians in Europe since World War II was flown to The Hague on Tuesday for trial after judges rejected his argument that he was too frail to be extradited. Ratko Mladic, the former Bosnian Serb general, was bundled onto a plane in Belgrade, the Serbian capital, late Tuesday afternoon to face charges of genocide and crimes against humanity for his part in the savage ethnic cleansing campaigns of the 1992-95 Bosnian war. Mladic's lawyer had tried to prevent his transfer on the grounds that the onetime military commander, 69, had suffered at least two strokes and was too mentally clouded to stand trial.
NEWS
February 16, 2001 | From Associated Press
Serbia pledged Thursday to expel or extradite non-Yugoslavs sought by the U.N. war crimes tribunal, meaning the Yugoslav republic may no longer be a haven for suspects from Bosnia and Croatia. The policy change by Serbia will have no impact on the status of former Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic--top Serbian and Yugoslav leaders insist that he must stand trial at home, at least initially, for corruption and crimes related to atrocities in the Serbian province of Kosovo.
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