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Extraordinary People

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NEWS
August 20, 2012 | By James Rainey
The man trying to provide Rep. Todd Akin the softest possible landing after the congressman's foolish comments about pregnancy and rape was former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, a strong supporter of Akin during his run to represent Missouri in the U.S. Senate. In the furor over Akin's remarks and increasing pressure for him to drop out of his race against Sen. Claire McCaskill,  Huckabee used his syndicated radio program Monday to give the embattled candidate a safe venue to express remorse and his determination to remain in the race.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2014 | By Amy Reiter
Perhaps in an attempt to live up to the drama implied by its apocalyptic-sounding name, the second night of the "final judgment" phase on "American Idol" included twists and tricks that were unexpected at least, it appeared, by the contestants themselves. At the top of the show, 17 of the top 30 slots - 15 guys and 15 young women - who would be featured in next week's live rounds had been claimed. And far more than 13 singers sat stressed out, their fates suspended, in the holding room.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1989 | ROBERT KOEHLER
The message delivered by John Zaritsky's documentary "Extraordinary People" (tonight at 9 on Channels 28 and 15, 10 p.m. on Channel 50) is decidedly mixed. By choosing to focus on the resilient abilities of three male Canadian victims of the deformity-causing drug thalidomide, it tends to emphasize--even romanticize--the indomitable human spirit, and pushes the meaning of the thalidomide tragedy to the background. Indeed, this mixed view is expressed by "thalidomide child" Alvin Law, who comments that it's no use blaming anyone for what happened, and is then seen organizing with other Canadian thalidomide victims to pressure their government for compensation overdue by at least 20 years.
NEWS
October 14, 2013 | By Leon Logothetis
“It is only in adventure that some people succeed in knowing themselves -- finding themselves” --Andre Gide It's quite humbling to think that I have already traveled from the fabled Hollywood sign in Los Angeles to the edge of Asia. Istanbul, Turkey, is a magnificent city, filled with culture and a thriving throb of humanity. I had reached this ancient city all on the kindness of strangers. This Kindness One adventure is an around-the-world trip that is being funded by strangers I meet as I go. I am driving a 1978 Chang Jiang yellow motorcycle with a sidecar that's been refitted with a BMW 750cc engine.
BOOKS
December 29, 1991 | Susan Heeger, Heeger is a Los Angeles writer
To say that "Extraordinary People" is structured as a series of linked stories gives no clue to its panoramic scope or to the implied eventfulness of its ellipses. Paul Gervais' chosen narrative form has the effect of a strong light shining here and there around a dusty, memory-filled attic; the light pauses on certain objects, but not to the total exclusion of others.
OPINION
May 9, 2003
In Birmingham, Ala., a reunion honored the extraordinary people who put their lives on the front lines of the civil rights movement ("The Foot Soldiers of Justice," May 2). I don't believe people today can imagine the strength and resolve necessary to stand up to the evils perpetrated upon black citizens -- the police, the vicious dogs and the angry mobs were just the tip of the terror heaped on those asking only for the rights guaranteed by our founding fathers. It was the extraordinary people who made the moment, not the reverse.
BOOKS
January 14, 1996 | Ted Simon, Ted Simon's most recent book is "The River Stops Here: How One Man's Battle to Save His Valley Changed the Fate of California" (Random House)
In a democracy, and most particularly in this one, it is not considered good form for politicians to seem exceptional. Smart, sure. Successful, yes. Tough, maybe. But exceptional? Hey, who do they think they are! Nowadays, it seems, we like our politicians to look neat and mediocre. We don't like to think that, hiding under those $200 haircuts, there might be extraordinary people with outrageous qualities, because there may well be monstrous egos and appetites to match. Such character traits we would rather discover in histories of biographies written long after our "representatives" have safely passed away.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2009
Thanks for Matea Gold's article on "Medium" ["It All Seems So Clear Now," Feb. 22]. The crime/psychic part of the series is very good and varied at times. But how it affects Allison's family and relationships is the real story. I was very disappointed but not surprised that "Medium" did not get any notice during Emmy or Golden Globe voting. Last season was one of its best. It showed that even extraordinary people (a psychic and a rocket scientist) can have everyday problems. And can someone please give an award to Jake Weber?
NEWS
October 14, 2013 | By Leon Logothetis
“It is only in adventure that some people succeed in knowing themselves -- finding themselves” --Andre Gide It's quite humbling to think that I have already traveled from the fabled Hollywood sign in Los Angeles to the edge of Asia. Istanbul, Turkey, is a magnificent city, filled with culture and a thriving throb of humanity. I had reached this ancient city all on the kindness of strangers. This Kindness One adventure is an around-the-world trip that is being funded by strangers I meet as I go. I am driving a 1978 Chang Jiang yellow motorcycle with a sidecar that's been refitted with a BMW 750cc engine.
SPORTS
June 11, 1999 | RANDY HARVEY
USC football Coach Paul Hackett was disappointed when he learned that the NCAA is considering the elimination of freshman eligibility in men's basketball. Let me reword that. He was disappointed when he learned that the NCAA is considering the elimination of freshman eligibility only in men's basketball. Hackett doesn't believe freshmen should be eligible for any sport, including football. His position is surprising for one reason. Carson Palmer.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2013 | By Irene Lacher
Theater director Peter Sellars, a UCLA professor of world arts and cultures, will be honored by the Santa Monica Museum of Art at its 25th-anniversary Precognito Gala on May 9. Why are you based in Los Angeles instead of New York, which has a larger arts community? For me, Los Angeles has always been the future and New York has always been the past. New York is the old power structure, and frankly, what's way more interesting is what's taking form in the 21st century in L.A. The future of America is happening right here.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
TORONTO -- Actor Dustin Hoffman has been trying to direct a movie for years. At the age of 75, he has finally done so, and if the audience reaction inside the Elgin Theatre on Sunday evening was any indication, it was well worth the wait. From the two standing ovations awarded to Hoffman and his 77-year old star, Maggie Smith, before the film even began, to a third handed out at the conclusion of the screening, it was evident that this older crowd at the Toronto International Film Festival was thrilled with Hoffman's film "Quartet.
NEWS
August 20, 2012 | By James Rainey
The man trying to provide Rep. Todd Akin the softest possible landing after the congressman's foolish comments about pregnancy and rape was former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee, a strong supporter of Akin during his run to represent Missouri in the U.S. Senate. In the furor over Akin's remarks and increasing pressure for him to drop out of his race against Sen. Claire McCaskill,  Huckabee used his syndicated radio program Monday to give the embattled candidate a safe venue to express remorse and his determination to remain in the race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2012 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Victor Spinetti, a comic actor and raconteur who won a Tony on Broadway and the adoration of Beatles fans when he appeared in three of the Fab Four's movies, died Tuesday in Monmouth, England. He was 82. The cause was cancer, said Barry Burnett, the actor's close friend and agent. Spinetti played multiple roles in "Oh, What a Lovely War," a musical satire about World War I that opened in London in 1963 and brought him a Tony Award in 1965 after moving to Broadway. His work in the original London production delighted John Lennon and George Harrison, who asked the well-known actor to appear in the Beatles' first film, "A Hard Day's Night" (1964)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2010
Extraordinary, Ordinary People A Memoir of Family Condoleezza Rice Crown Archetype: 342 pp., $27
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009
Fiction weeks on list 1. The Help by Kathryn Stockett (Putnam: $24.95) The lives of a maid, a cook and a college graduate become intertwined as they change a Mississippi town. 24 2. The Lacuna by Barbara Kingsolver (Harper: $26.99) A writer's escapades encompassing the 1930s Mexican art community and the Cold War. 1 3. Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel (Henry Holt: $27) The rise of Henry VIII's advisor Thomas Cromwell.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009
Fiction weeks on list 1. The Help by Kathryn Stockett (Putnam: $24.95) The lives of a maid, a cook and a college graduate become intertwined as they change a Mississippi town. 24 2. The Lacuna by Barbara Kingsolver (Harper: $26.99) A writer's escapades encompassing the 1930s Mexican art community and the Cold War. 1 3. Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel (Henry Holt: $27) The rise of Henry VIII's advisor Thomas Cromwell.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2012 | By Nicole Sperling
TORONTO -- Actor Dustin Hoffman has been trying to direct a movie for years. At the age of 75, he has finally done so, and if the audience reaction inside the Elgin Theatre on Sunday evening was any indication, it was well worth the wait. From the two standing ovations awarded to Hoffman and his 77-year old star, Maggie Smith, before the film even began, to a third handed out at the conclusion of the screening, it was evident that this older crowd at the Toronto International Film Festival was thrilled with Hoffman's film "Quartet.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2009
Thanks for Matea Gold's article on "Medium" ["It All Seems So Clear Now," Feb. 22]. The crime/psychic part of the series is very good and varied at times. But how it affects Allison's family and relationships is the real story. I was very disappointed but not surprised that "Medium" did not get any notice during Emmy or Golden Globe voting. Last season was one of its best. It showed that even extraordinary people (a psychic and a rocket scientist) can have everyday problems. And can someone please give an award to Jake Weber?
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