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Extraterrestrial Intelligence

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BOOKS
September 4, 1994
Susan Dewan's review of "Abduction" by John Mack accepts the notions that so-called "UFO abductees" bring back wisdom from kindly aliens, concerned for Earth's welfare. She says this near-universal message is "much more important than the endless debate over whether UFOs are real. . . ." Alas, no "abductee" has ever announced any news that was simultaneously true and unambiguous, and that Earthly science did not already know. Shouldn't helpful aliens tell us about dangers that aren't already subject to Angst in our own, human media?
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NEWS
November 7, 2011 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The Obama administration's position on the existence of aliens, and whether the people of Earth have had contact with them, can be summed up this way: "Searching for ET, but no evidence yet. " That's the title of the official White House response to an online petition signed by 12,078 people that asks the government to acknowledge an "extraterrestrial presence engaging the human race. " "Hundreds of military and government agency witnesses have come forward with testimony confirming this extraterrestrial presence," the writers of the petition contend.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1985 | LEE DEMBART, Times Staff Writer
Iosef S. Shklovskii, a seminal and prolific Soviet astrophysicist best known in this country for his speculations on extraterrestrial life, died Sunday in Moscow at 68. Although he was Jewish and an outspoken critic of the Soviet system, Shklovskii's contributions to astronomy and to the Soviet unmanned planetary space program protected him from reprisals by Russian authorities. He was a gifted teacher whose students included today's leaders of the Soviet scientific space program.
OPINION
June 18, 2011 | Christopher Cokinos, University of Arizona English professor Christopher Cokinos is working on a popular narrative history of SETI. He's the author of "The Fallen Sky: An Intimate History of Shooting Stars."
In a country where some corporations do not pay taxes, millionaires get farm subsidies and a presidential candidate can run up a half-million-dollar tab at Tiffany's, we're deferring an attempt to answer one of our most enduring (and least inexpensive to answer) questions: Are we alone in the universe? Certainly we don't cotton to the idea of being alone. We yearn for the big signal from the stars, the cosmic hail. When Stephen Hawking warns us against contacting E.T. because we might end up invaded by Klingons, we argue about it around the water cooler.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1987 | United Press International
Scientists searching the heavens for a message from extraterrestrials are listening to radio waves in a 1,000-star "window" amid the galaxy's estimated 300 billion celestial bodies. They believe life forms in outer space might be operating radio beacons to attract the attention of other civilizations throughout the galaxies.
NEWS
November 7, 2011 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The Obama administration's position on the existence of aliens, and whether the people of Earth have had contact with them, can be summed up this way: "Searching for ET, but no evidence yet. " That's the title of the official White House response to an online petition signed by 12,078 people that asks the government to acknowledge an "extraterrestrial presence engaging the human race. " "Hundreds of military and government agency witnesses have come forward with testimony confirming this extraterrestrial presence," the writers of the petition contend.
OPINION
June 18, 2011 | Christopher Cokinos, University of Arizona English professor Christopher Cokinos is working on a popular narrative history of SETI. He's the author of "The Fallen Sky: An Intimate History of Shooting Stars."
In a country where some corporations do not pay taxes, millionaires get farm subsidies and a presidential candidate can run up a half-million-dollar tab at Tiffany's, we're deferring an attempt to answer one of our most enduring (and least inexpensive to answer) questions: Are we alone in the universe? Certainly we don't cotton to the idea of being alone. We yearn for the big signal from the stars, the cosmic hail. When Stephen Hawking warns us against contacting E.T. because we might end up invaded by Klingons, we argue about it around the water cooler.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Hey, E.T., if you have been hiding somewhere in the southern sky, the jig may be about up. The Planetary Society, which has been looking for you in the northern sky for several years now with no success, is shipping a truckload of equipment to Argentina to carry out the search for the first time from the Southern Hemisphere. And if you would just beam out a radio message to Earth sometime soon now, it would save everybody a lot of time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1990 | MELVIN KONNER, MD, Konner teaches medical anthropology at Emory University. His column appears every other week.
"He was a one-eyed, one-horned, flying purple people-eater. . . ." So went the words to a 1960s hit song, inventing an extraterrestrial visitor in the way people have since the beginning of human consciousness. Religions may rule out intelligent life on other planets, but astronomers rule it in. Under their influence, our government just decided to spend $100 million over the next decade sending messages into space to try to contact the critters.
BOOKS
September 22, 1991 | Charles Solomon
The authors of the 21 essays and stories in this anthology attempt to strip away the pseudo-scientific claptrap that clouds this potentially fascinating subject, and concentrate on the complex questions it encompasses. How common are stars with planets in the galaxy, and what conditions led to their formation? Is the development of life on a planet a freak occurence or is it the nearly inevitable result of certain physical and chemical conditions?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1999 | SARAH YANG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Alive today is the first generation of scientists to interrogate the darkness. Conceivably it might also be the last generation before contact is made--and this the last moment before we discover that someone in the darkness is calling out to us. --Carl Sagan [from "Pale Blue Dot," p. 352] * Every day, every few seconds, some of the world's most powerful radio telescopes scan millions of channels in outer space in an effort to detect signs of extraterrestrial communication.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1997 | RON HARRIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Is the truth really out there? A handful of scientists listening intently for faint radio signals from distant solar systems are keeping their ears, and minds, open to that possibility. Like their Hollywood counterparts in the movie "Contact," scientists at the SETI Institute hunt for life in space using powerful radio telescopes. SETI, short for Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, is surveying 1,000 stars similar to our sun but light years distant.
BOOKS
September 4, 1994
Susan Dewan's review of "Abduction" by John Mack accepts the notions that so-called "UFO abductees" bring back wisdom from kindly aliens, concerned for Earth's welfare. She says this near-universal message is "much more important than the endless debate over whether UFOs are real. . . ." Alas, no "abductee" has ever announced any news that was simultaneously true and unambiguous, and that Earthly science did not already know. Shouldn't helpful aliens tell us about dangers that aren't already subject to Angst in our own, human media?
BOOKS
September 22, 1991 | Charles Solomon
The authors of the 21 essays and stories in this anthology attempt to strip away the pseudo-scientific claptrap that clouds this potentially fascinating subject, and concentrate on the complex questions it encompasses. How common are stars with planets in the galaxy, and what conditions led to their formation? Is the development of life on a planet a freak occurence or is it the nearly inevitable result of certain physical and chemical conditions?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1990 | MELVIN KONNER, MD, Konner teaches medical anthropology at Emory University. His column appears every other week.
"He was a one-eyed, one-horned, flying purple people-eater. . . ." So went the words to a 1960s hit song, inventing an extraterrestrial visitor in the way people have since the beginning of human consciousness. Religions may rule out intelligent life on other planets, but astronomers rule it in. Under their influence, our government just decided to spend $100 million over the next decade sending messages into space to try to contact the critters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Hey, E.T., if you have been hiding somewhere in the southern sky, the jig may be about up. The Planetary Society, which has been looking for you in the northern sky for several years now with no success, is shipping a truckload of equipment to Argentina to carry out the search for the first time from the Southern Hemisphere. And if you would just beam out a radio message to Earth sometime soon now, it would save everybody a lot of time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1999 | SARAH YANG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Alive today is the first generation of scientists to interrogate the darkness. Conceivably it might also be the last generation before contact is made--and this the last moment before we discover that someone in the darkness is calling out to us. --Carl Sagan [from "Pale Blue Dot," p. 352] * Every day, every few seconds, some of the world's most powerful radio telescopes scan millions of channels in outer space in an effort to detect signs of extraterrestrial communication.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1997 | RON HARRIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Is the truth really out there? A handful of scientists listening intently for faint radio signals from distant solar systems are keeping their ears, and minds, open to that possibility. Like their Hollywood counterparts in the movie "Contact," scientists at the SETI Institute hunt for life in space using powerful radio telescopes. SETI, short for Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, is surveying 1,000 stars similar to our sun but light years distant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1987 | United Press International
Scientists searching the heavens for a message from extraterrestrials are listening to radio waves in a 1,000-star "window" amid the galaxy's estimated 300 billion celestial bodies. They believe life forms in outer space might be operating radio beacons to attract the attention of other civilizations throughout the galaxies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1985 | LEE DEMBART, Times Staff Writer
Iosef S. Shklovskii, a seminal and prolific Soviet astrophysicist best known in this country for his speculations on extraterrestrial life, died Sunday in Moscow at 68. Although he was Jewish and an outspoken critic of the Soviet system, Shklovskii's contributions to astronomy and to the Soviet unmanned planetary space program protected him from reprisals by Russian authorities. He was a gifted teacher whose students included today's leaders of the Soviet scientific space program.
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