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SPORTS
July 12, 2001 | JUSTIN HECKERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tom Clarke stood at the upper reaches of the mountain, glaring through the West Virginia heat, zinc oxide and camouflage flecked in war-paint stripes across his face, the sleeves ripped off his T-shirt, hiking boots laced tightly, golf clubs by his side. In front of him stretched the wide and unfriendly pocks and crevasses that mark Snowshoe Mountain's terrain, suitable for rock climbing in the summer and skiing in the winter. But golf? Yes, golf.
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BOOKS
December 11, 2005 | Kristina Lindgren, Kristina Lindgren is an assistant editor of Book Review.
NEED extra challenge in your golf game? For those who have mastered the sport's intricacies and hunger for more, there is the Awesome Eight golf society, created along the lines of mountaineering's Seven Summits challenge. But instead of scaling the highest peaks on each of seven continents, the goal is to play in the "harshest conditions the planet can throw at you," writes Duncan Lennard in his handsomely photographed book "Extreme Golf."
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SPORTS
August 15, 1997 | PETER YOON
Driven by his passionate hatred of slow play in golf, Jay Larson has spent the past three years as the champion of what he deems the cure: extreme golf. The premise is simple. Competitors play a round of golf as fast as they can. Upon completion, the score and the time are added together to formulate an extreme golf score. For example, if you shoot 85 in 70 minutes your score is 155.
SPORTS
July 12, 2001 | JUSTIN HECKERT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tom Clarke stood at the upper reaches of the mountain, glaring through the West Virginia heat, zinc oxide and camouflage flecked in war-paint stripes across his face, the sleeves ripped off his T-shirt, hiking boots laced tightly, golf clubs by his side. In front of him stretched the wide and unfriendly pocks and crevasses that mark Snowshoe Mountain's terrain, suitable for rock climbing in the summer and skiing in the winter. But golf? Yes, golf.
BOOKS
December 11, 2005 | Kristina Lindgren, Kristina Lindgren is an assistant editor of Book Review.
NEED extra challenge in your golf game? For those who have mastered the sport's intricacies and hunger for more, there is the Awesome Eight golf society, created along the lines of mountaineering's Seven Summits challenge. But instead of scaling the highest peaks on each of seven continents, the goal is to play in the "harshest conditions the planet can throw at you," writes Duncan Lennard in his handsomely photographed book "Extreme Golf."
SPORTS
February 7, 1998
Bill Plaschke's Feb. 3 column is the best I have read or heard on the Casey Martin case. When I first heard about this case, everyone was saying it wasn't fair for him to ride a cart. Their arguments were quite good and I almost believed them, but I was still left with an uneasy feeling. As the press and everyone started debating the subject more, there were finally arguments being made in Mr. Martin's favor but none as good as Bill's column. This is an excellent piece worthy of awards and should be used in closing arguments in Eugene.
SPORTS
September 3, 1999 | THOMAS BONK
There were four no-shows at Monday's U.S. Ryder Cup team play date at the Country Club in Brookline, Mass.--Tiger Woods, Mark O'Meara, Tom Lehman and Davis Love III. All were excused. Woods, O'Meara and Lehman had previous business commitments, but Love was out because of a nerve problem in his neck. What the U.S. players experienced at the Country Club was a setup that featured some blind approach shots, narrow fairways and small greens with lots of slope, but not a lot of high rough.
SPORTS
August 15, 1997 | PETER YOON
Driven by his passionate hatred of slow play in golf, Jay Larson has spent the past three years as the champion of what he deems the cure: extreme golf. The premise is simple. Competitors play a round of golf as fast as they can. Upon completion, the score and the time are added together to formulate an extreme golf score. For example, if you shoot 85 in 70 minutes your score is 155.
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