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Exxon Oil Spill

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1989
Maybe I missed something! Since Exxon lost a bunch of oil causing a shortage in Southern California, I am going to have to pay more for my gas? What a rip-off. It's not bad enough they foul up our waterways, beaches, and landscape--the poor slob who made billionaires of them must pay through the nose--again and again and again. That really ticks me off! T. BRUCE CLARKE Ontario
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
President Obama has nominated an Alaska Supreme Court justice who earlier served on Planned Parenthood's board and battled Big Oil over the Exxon Valdez spill to a seat on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. The White House announced late Wednesday that it was proposing Justice Morgan Christen for one of three open seats on the San Francisco-based appeals court. The proposed elevation of the 49-year-old Washington state native was made on the eve of a contentious vote called in the Senate Judiciary Committee on Obama's first nomination to the 9th Circuit, that of UC Berkeley law professor Goodwin Liu, which has languished in the Senate for 15 months.
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NEWS
August 25, 1989 | From United Press International
The state of Alaska has characterized the Exxon oil spill cleanup as a failure, saying it has left oil on beaches and that animals continue to die five months after the tanker Exxon Valdez ran aground. Coast Guard officials overseeing the Exxon cleanup said Thursday that they were studying the state's assessment, but Exxon officials rejected the state's harsh critique of the cleanup that is winding down toward a Sept. 15 quitting date.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2010 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
Richard N. Goldman, a San Francisco philanthropist and civic leader who co-founded the Goldman Environmental Prize to recognize grass-roots environmental activism around the world, has died. He was 90. Goldman, a passionate supporter of environmental causes, the Jewish community and Israel, died Monday at his San Francisco home, according to his family. The Richard and Rhoda Goldman Fund, created in 1951 by Goldman and his wife, an heir to the Levi Strauss fortune, has given away more than $680 million since its inception.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1997 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Money linked to the devastating Exxon Valdez oil spill that fouled Alaska shorelines will be used to remedy another oil-tainted coastal property--the Bolsa Chica wetlands. Those crafting the public purchase of Bolsa Chica confirmed Thursday that the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency will contribute $400,000 to the cleanup effort from a settlement related to the devastating 1989 Exxon spill.
NATIONAL
December 7, 2002 | From Associated Press
A federal judge Friday reduced by $1 billion the damage award against Exxon Mobil Corp. for spilling 11 million gallons of crude oil into Prince William Sound 13 years ago. U.S. District Judge Russel Holland reduced the original $5-billion punitive damages award to $4 billion. An Alaska jury in 1994 approved the original award in the Exxon Valdez spill, but the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals found it excessive and sent the case back to Holland. Exxon Mobil says it will appeal the new figure.
NEWS
November 5, 2001 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The toll of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill is a sadly familiar one: 250,000 dead birds, 2,800 sea otters, 300 harbor seals--all victims of the oil tanker that ran over a reef late one April night and drained 11 million gallons of oil into Prince William Sound. There are others whom almost no one talks about, although unlike the birds, most of them are still alive. They are the people who scraped oil off the beaches, skimmed it off the top of the water, hosed it off rocks.
NEWS
May 2, 1999 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court will hear arguments Monday that the jury that awarded more than $5 billion in damages in the Exxon Valdez oil spill was tainted by a bailiff who pulled out his gun and joked about putting a holdout juror "out of her misery." The same juror, who attempted suicide three weeks after the verdict, alleged she was threatened by other jurors and by the bailiff, who was forced to resign from the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1997 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Money linked to the devastating Exxon Valdez oil spill that fouled Alaska shorelines will be used to remedy another oil-tainted coastal property--the Bolsa Chica wetlands. Those crafting the public purchase of Bolsa Chica confirmed Thursday that the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency will contribute $400,000 to the cleanup effort from a settlement related to the devastating 1989 Exxon spill.
NEWS
September 25, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A jury in Anchorage awarded $9.7 million on to six Alaska Native corporations and a borough that sued over land damages caused by the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. The verdict in Anchorage Superior Court disappointed the plaintiffs, who sought more than $120 million. "It doesn't come anywhere close to what's been damaged," said Charles Totemoff, president of the Chenega Corp.
BUSINESS
May 2, 1994 | From Reuters
After five years, several failed fish harvests, a huge wildlife death toll and discovery of what government scientists say are chronic and genetic injuries to marine life, the case of the Exxon Valdez oil spill is going to trial. Jury selection is scheduled to start today in U.S. District Court in the case of about 14,000 commercial fishermen, Alaska natives, property owners and others suing Exxon Corp. over the 1989 spill.
NEWS
March 27, 1994 | CHRIS GRYGIEL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The oil that spilled from the Exxon Valdez killed hundreds of thousands of marine animals. But biologists say the ships that ply state waters often carry a cargo that could prove even more devastating to plant and animal life--rats. "If a ship goes aground on a major sea bird colony, the resulting damage could be far worse to marine life than the (1989) Exxon oil spill," said Art Sowls, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
NEWS
March 20, 1994 | ROSANNE PAGANO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tides and times have been kind to Prince William Sound in the five years since the Exxon Valdez rammed a charted reef, dumping nearly 11 million gallons of crude oil into pristine waters. Storms have scoured Alaska's 1,500 miles of polluted coastline, removing about half the oil embedded in some places. Many beaches look clean. Population forecasts for bald eagles are good. The tourists are back. "It's behind us," said John Manly, an aide to Gov. Walter J.
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