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Exxon Valdez Oil

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NEWS
August 29, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A third summer has passed since the Exxon Valdez oil spill, and one can see positive signs of environmental recovery in Prince William Sound. But, because the eyes can see only so much, the intellect remains wary. Just how bad, or good, is it now in one of America's most bountiful waterways after America's worst oil leak? Don't ask. Those who know will not tell. Certainly, they will not tell all.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
President Obama has nominated an Alaska Supreme Court justice who earlier served on Planned Parenthood's board and battled Big Oil over the Exxon Valdez spill to a seat on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. The White House announced late Wednesday that it was proposing Justice Morgan Christen for one of three open seats on the San Francisco-based appeals court. The proposed elevation of the 49-year-old Washington state native was made on the eve of a contentious vote called in the Senate Judiciary Committee on Obama's first nomination to the 9th Circuit, that of UC Berkeley law professor Goodwin Liu, which has languished in the Senate for 15 months.
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BUSINESS
May 2, 1994 | From Reuters
After five years, several failed fish harvests, a huge wildlife death toll and discovery of what government scientists say are chronic and genetic injuries to marine life, the case of the Exxon Valdez oil spill is going to trial. Jury selection is scheduled to start today in U.S. District Court in the case of about 14,000 commercial fishermen, Alaska natives, property owners and others suing Exxon Corp. over the 1989 spill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 2010 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
Richard N. Goldman, a San Francisco philanthropist and civic leader who co-founded the Goldman Environmental Prize to recognize grass-roots environmental activism around the world, has died. He was 90. Goldman, a passionate supporter of environmental causes, the Jewish community and Israel, died Monday at his San Francisco home, according to his family. The Richard and Rhoda Goldman Fund, created in 1951 by Goldman and his wife, an heir to the Levi Strauss fortune, has given away more than $680 million since its inception.
NEWS
October 8, 1991 | RICK BASS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES. Bass, a petroleum geologist and environmental activist, is the author of "Oil Notes," memoirs of his work in the oil industry, and "Winter," essays about Montana
It has been said there are only two themes for all the stories in the world: A stranger rides into town, or a friend goes on a journey. An ambitious, accomplished account of how Exxon mismanaged the Valdez oil spill cleanup, John Keeble's "Out of the Channel" is a rare fusion of both themes. The stranger, of course, is Exxon, which rode into the small fishing communities of Valdez, Cordova and Port Graham, fragmenting and changing them profoundly.
NEWS
March 20, 1994 | ROSANNE PAGANO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tides and times have been kind to Prince William Sound in the five years since the Exxon Valdez rammed a charted reef, dumping nearly 11 million gallons of crude oil into pristine waters. Storms have scoured Alaska's 1,500 miles of polluted coastline, removing about half the oil embedded in some places. Many beaches look clean. Population forecasts for bald eagles are good. The tourists are back. "It's behind us," said John Manly, an aide to Gov. Walter J.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2000
Exxon Mobil Corp. lost a bid to set aside a $5-billion punitive damage award stemming from the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaskan waters. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals rejected the company's claim that the judgment should be overturned. Guide to Our Staff: Need to reach Business section reporters or editors? A guide to the section's staff can be found at http://www.latimes.com/bizstaff.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Exxon Appeals Damage Award: The oil company said it filed motions in U.S. District Court in Anchorage, Alaska, to overturn or reduce the verdicts in a host of civil lawsuits deriving from the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil tanker spill. Exxon Corp. Chairman Lee R. Raymond described as particularly "unwarranted, unfair and . . . excessive" the $5-billion punitive-damages award handed down by an Anchorage jury Sept. 16.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Exxon was granted a delay in its criminal trial until October on charges arising from the Exxon Valdez oil spill. The giant oil company also wants an indefinite delay in civil damage trials now scheduled for 1992 or 1993, according to court papers. U.S. District Court Judge H. Russel Holland in Anchorage set Oct. 7 for Exxon Corp. and Exxon Shipping Co. to face criminal charges.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Exxon Valdez Trials Set for 1993: A judge in Anchorage has ordered civil trials over the Exxon Valdez oil spill to begin in April, 1993. Superior Court Judge Brian Shortell divided the cases into requests for punitive damages and lawsuits filed for other compensation. Exxon Corp. lawyers have said they expect to turn over about 30 million pages of documents for the trials and face about 19,000 lawsuits over the nation's worst oil spill.
OPINION
August 28, 2009
In a small, spare courtroom in the Amazon region of Ecuador, Chevron Corp., California's largest company and one of the world's largest oil producers, will soon face a day of reckoning. After 16 years of litigation, a case the company inherited in a merger, Aguinda vs. Texaco Inc., is nearing an end. The legal battle that began in the United States in 1993 and resumed in Ecuador in 2003 has pitted the multinational against an unlikely adversary, a coalition of indigenous tribes and communities.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2009 | Carol J. Williams
Exxon Mobil Corp. must pay victims of the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill $480 million more in interest on their delayed punitive damages awards as well as cover $70 million in the company's own appeals costs, a federal appeals court ruled Monday. The decision by a three-judge panel of the U.S.
NATIONAL
December 6, 2008 | Kim Murphy, Murphy is a Times staff writer.
A little less than 20 years ago, Mike Webber was king of his own watery world. He was 28 years old, with three herring fishing boats. He leased another long-line boat for halibut, and gill-netted the fat salmon that made Prince William Sound one of the most legendary fisheries in the world. Then came the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. Overnight, it was all gone: Fish prices plummeted. People started selling their fishing permits to pay their mortgages, and then lost their houses anyway.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2007 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
After the Exxon Valdez oil tanker ran aground in 1989, experts predicted it would take years to clean up the worst oil spill in U.S. history and restore the pristine waters of Alaska's Prince William Sound. It has turned out that cleaning up the massive litigation in its wake has taken even longer. To the surprise and dismay of some weary plaintiffs' lawyers, the Supreme Court announced Monday that it would reconsider whether Exxon Mobil Corp. can be forced to pay a record $2.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Oil that spilled when the Exxon Valdez tanker ran aground on a jagged rock in 1989 still lingers on and just below Alaska's surface. So does the resentment, and state hearings on the continued effects of the 11-million-gallon spill are reviving the pain and anger of the people affected by the spill. Exxon Mobil Corp. spokesman Mark Boudreaux has said the company paid the compensation it owes and that its studies show Prince William Sound is "healthy, robust and thriving."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2005 | From Associated Press
Lawrence G. Rawl, a petroleum engineer who rose to become chairman and chief executive of Exxon Corp. and led the company's response to criticism after the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska, has died. He was 76. Rawl died Sunday in Fort Worth, the company said Monday. No cause of death was given. "Larry was a strong leader for our company and the petroleum industry," said Lee R. Raymond, Rawl's successor and now the chairman and chief executive of Exxon Mobil Corp.
NATIONAL
January 29, 2004 | From Associated Press
A federal judge Wednesday ordered Exxon Mobil Corp. to pay about $6.75 billion to thousands of Alaskans affected by the 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill. The ruling is the latest of several damage awards in the case over the last decade -- the result of successful appeals in federal court by Exxon. The company plans to appeal again. The ruling by U.S. District Judge H. Russel Holland ordered Exxon, based in Irving, Texas, to pay $4.5 billion in punitive damages and about $2.25 billion in interest.
NATIONAL
December 7, 2002 | From Associated Press
A federal judge Friday reduced by $1 billion the damage award against Exxon Mobil Corp. for spilling 11 million gallons of crude oil into Prince William Sound 13 years ago. U.S. District Judge Russel Holland reduced the original $5-billion punitive damages award to $4 billion. An Alaska jury in 1994 approved the original award in the Exxon Valdez spill, but the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals found it excessive and sent the case back to Holland. Exxon Mobil says it will appeal the new figure.
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