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Exxon Valdez Ship

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NEWS
July 6, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Exxon Valdez, the ship that caused the nation's worst oil spill when it ran aground in Alaskan waters last year, will be returned to service this summer, officials said. The $30-million repair job on the vessel is nearing completion at the National Steel and Shipbuilding Co. and Exxon Shipping Co. President Gus Elmer is expected today to announce plans for returning the tanker to service, after a two-week trial run set to begin July 20.
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NATIONAL
February 28, 2008 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 19 years after the Exxon Valdez oil spill fouled Alaska's Prince William Sound, the Supreme Court debated Wednesday whether the world's largest oil company must pay a record $2.5 billion in punitive damages. The eight justices who heard the case appeared closely split, although several of them said they were looking for a way to reduce the size of the award. Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. sat out the case because he is an Exxon stockholder.
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NEWS
June 22, 1999 | From Associated Press
Nine years after his conviction for illegally spilling oil in pristine Alaska waters, Capt. Joseph Hazelwood started his punishment Monday on the litter patrol. Hazelwood, former skipper of the tanker Exxon Valdez, spent the day loading a truck with abandoned auto parts and assorted junk thrown along the roadsides of Anchorage. He worked with one other man and a supervisor.
NATIONAL
October 30, 2007 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
After the Exxon Valdez oil tanker ran aground in 1989, experts predicted it would take years to clean up the worst oil spill in U.S. history and restore the pristine waters of Alaska's Prince William Sound. It has turned out that cleaning up the massive litigation in its wake has taken even longer. To the surprise and dismay of some weary plaintiffs' lawyers, the Supreme Court announced Monday that it would reconsider whether Exxon Mobil Corp. can be forced to pay a record $2.
NEWS
October 8, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unpublished studies by state and federal researchers contend that the true cost of environmental damage from the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska could be as high as $15 billion, according to experts familiar with the secret reports. The figure stands in dramatic contrast to the $1.125-billion settlement that Exxon Corp. agreed to last week to settle criminal and civil complaints brought by the state of Alaska and the federal government. Alaska Gov. Walter J.
NEWS
October 8, 1989
A Coast Guard administrative law judge in Seattle stripped for nine months the license of the officer who was on the bridge when the oil tanker Exxon Valdez struck a reef in Alaska, causing the nation's worst oil spill. Judge Roscoe Wilkes bypassed the standard three- to six-month sentence for Gregory Cousins, and said the massive oil spill called for more severe punishment.
NEWS
August 10, 1989
Chevron Corp.'s plan to use tankers to ship crude oil from its operation at Point Arguello in Santa Barbara County to the oil company's refinery in El Segundo was rejected by the state Coastal Commission. Admittedly affected by the 11-million-gallon Exxon tanker spill in Alaska, commission members said Chevron will have to consider using pipelines to deliver the oil south.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | From United Press International
Exxon Valdez Third Mate Gregory Cousins testified Wednesday in his former skipper's trial that the tanker ran aground for one reason--the helmsman failed to execute steering orders given by Cousins. Cousins said he is convinced that the Exxon Valdez would have missed Bligh Reef by 2 miles if the orders of Capt. Joseph Hazelwood, who has since been fired, had been carried out.
NEWS
May 16, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Settlement money from the Exxon Valdez oil spill will be used to buy 42,000 acres on Afognak Island to protect bald eagles and marbled murrelets, two bird species hit hard by the 1989 tanker accident. The $38.7-million purchase approved by the Exxon Oil Spill Settlement Council stops logging near Seal Bay in the island's northeast corner to protect the birds' habitat. The state will own the land.
BUSINESS
October 17, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exxon Corp. will have to lay out less than half the $1.125 billion it agreed to pay in an out-of-court settlement with Alaska and the federal government over environmental damage from the Exxon Valdez oil spill, according to an Alaskan legislative study. Tax benefits and the fact that Exxon will pay the bulk of the settlement--the $900-million civil portion--over 10 years are the reasons for the lower real cost, according to the study.
NEWS
November 8, 2001 | HENRY WEINSTEIN and KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal appeals court Wednesday struck down a $5-billion punitive damage judgment against Exxon Mobil Corp. stemming from the massive 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals, based in San Francisco, ruled, 3 to 0, that the award was excessive on several grounds. At $5 billion, the punitive award--the largest ever at the time it was awarded--was 17 times more than the $287-million in compensatory damages granted by a jury in 1994.
NEWS
June 22, 1999 | From Associated Press
Nine years after his conviction for illegally spilling oil in pristine Alaska waters, Capt. Joseph Hazelwood started his punishment Monday on the litter patrol. Hazelwood, former skipper of the tanker Exxon Valdez, spent the day loading a truck with abandoned auto parts and assorted junk thrown along the roadsides of Anchorage. He worked with one other man and a supervisor.
NEWS
March 20, 1999 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year after the Exxon Valdez ground onto a reef in the middle of a frigid March night in 1989, unleashing the worst environmental disaster in U.S history, a striking thing happened. Amid oil-blinded sea otters and beached whales and the limp black carcasses of 250,000 shorebirds came the slow, sure swim of the pink salmon. The 1990 run was 44.5 million fish, the highest on record, almost four times higher than the year before 11 million gallons of oil spilled into Prince William Sound.
NEWS
October 5, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Oil from the 1989 grounding of the Exxon Valdez supertanker in Prince William Sound will kill or stunt Alaskan pink salmon for generations to come, government scientists say. "Those buried oil pockets are sort of like land mines," said Jeffrey Short, a scientist with the National Marine Fisheries Service. The service's researchers presented their findings at a conference in Anchorage. Despite a massive cleanup of the 10.
NEWS
February 14, 1997 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Money linked to the devastating Exxon Valdez oil spill that fouled Alaska shorelines will be used to clean up another oil-tainted coastline--the Bolsa Chica wetlands. Those drafting the public purchase of Bolsa Chica learned Thursday that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will contribute $400,000 set aside from a settlement reached after the devastating 1989 Exxon spill. The money is part of a much larger sum the oil giant paid the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1997 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Money linked to the devastating Exxon Valdez oil spill that fouled Alaska shorelines will be used to remedy another oil-tainted coastal property--the Bolsa Chica wetlands. Those crafting the public purchase of Bolsa Chica confirmed Thursday that the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency will contribute $400,000 to the cleanup effort from a settlement related to the devastating 1989 Exxon spill.
NEWS
March 23, 1991 | Associated Press
Exxon Corp. and its shipping subsidiary pleaded guilty Friday to misdemeanor violations in the nation's worst oil spill under a plea agreement with the federal government. U.S. District Judge Russel Holland allowed the pleas but delayed sentencing until he gathers public comment on the plea agreement. He set sentencing for April 24. If Holland rejects the agreement, the corporation can withdraw its pleas. If he accepts it, federal felony charges against the oil company will be dropped.
NEWS
February 14, 1997 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Money linked to the devastating Exxon Valdez oil spill that fouled Alaska shorelines will be used to clean up another oil-tainted coastline--the Bolsa Chica wetlands. Those drafting the public purchase of Bolsa Chica learned Thursday that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will contribute $400,000 set aside from a settlement reached after the devastating 1989 Exxon spill. The money is part of a much larger sum the oil giant paid the U.S.
NEWS
October 11, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
More than seven years after the biggest oil spill in U.S. history, the bald eagle has been the only species among 28 to recover from the damage in the waters off Alaska, U.S. officials said. Despite the grim picture, federal and state officials said they were pleased with the progress they had made in acquiring land in Alaska to protect wildlife in the aftermath of the Exxon Valdez oil tanker spill.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Exxon Wins $250-Million Verdict in Valdez Suit: A Houston jury issued its decision in favor of the oil giant in the suit against Lloyd's of London stemming from unpaid insurance claims from the Exxon Valdez oil spill. The state court verdict, which still must be approved by the U.S. District Court in Houston, would allow Exxon to continue with a separate suit alleging Lloyd's acted in bad faith by not paying claims from two policies held by the oil company, the nation's largest.
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