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Eyal Halfon

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1998 | FLORE DE PRENEUF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Any Israeli filmmaker knows to stay clear of the Palestinian issue. With suicide bombers and violent clashes making headlines on the news day after bloody day, the last thing the Israeli public wants to see is a film about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, let alone its most violent chapter, the long intifada.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1998 | FLORE DE PRENEUF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Any Israeli filmmaker knows to stay clear of the Palestinian issue. With suicide bombers and violent clashes making headlines on the news day after bloody day, the last thing the Israeli public wants to see is a film about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, let alone its most violent chapter, the long intifada.
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NEWS
December 1, 2005 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
EYAL HALFON'S "What a Wonderful Place" is an engaging and potent work that arrives upon a recent wave of diverse and outstanding films from Israel -- an apt work that was to open the 21st Israel Film Festival on Wednesday night. As part of the festival, which runs through Dec. 15 at various venues, the movie will screen an additional four times, including Sunday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1992 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The basic question of almost any anti-war movie is "Why are we killing each other?" And it can be asked a number of ways: devastatingly, gently, with sociocultural shadings, horrifically, sadly or even comically. "Cup Final" (Nuart), an excellent Israeli anti-war drama set in June, 1982, during both the Israeli invasion of Lebanon and the World Cup soccer finals, shifts freely among all those moods: Grim and funny, sensitive and tough, lyrical and explosive.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Cinematheque promises a vintage premiere with all the trimmings Friday, when it opens the doors to its permanent home at the restored 1922 Egyptian Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard with a gala, invitation-only screening of Cecil B. DeMille's original "The Ten Commandments." "The Ten Commandments," which had its premiere at the Egyptian exactly 75 years ago on Dec. 4, 1923, will be shown to the public Saturday at 8 p.m., preceded by a 7 p.m.
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