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NEWS
January 12, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
It was a photo of 8-month-old Brendan Shannon that provided the most telling evidence that something was wrong with one of his eyes. The problem was noticeable but not enough to ring alarm bells for his parents. That would come later. Brendan was diagnosed with retinoblastoma, an eye cancer that can give the eye a milky-white appearance. In this Chicago Tribune story, his mother says only after an initial diagnosis did she go back and look at photos of her young son. "I wanted to throw up," said Danielle, 31, a former graphic designer.
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BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Rancho Feeding Corp., the Bay Area slaughterhouse that recalled nearly 9 million pounds of beef products last month, sold some meat that came from cows with eye cancer, according to documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act. Meat processed by Rancho Feeding was sold to thousands of retail stores, including Kroger, Food 4 Less and Wal-Mart as well as smaller meat markets that cater to Latino customers. The Rancho Feeding recall has also led to a voluntary recall by Nestle of its Philly Steak and Cheese flavored Hot Pockets after it discovered a supplier had bought meat from Rancho Feeding.
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SCIENCE
March 22, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An experimental technique for a rare eye cancer has saved some children from losing their eyes and even restored vision in a few cases, U.S. researchers said this week at a Washington meeting of the Society for Interventional Radiology. After threading a catheter through the body to the eye, doctors delivered a drug directly to retinoblastoma tumors through an artery. This allowed them to administer a much larger dose of the chemotherapy drug melphalan, made by GlaxoSmithKline under the brand name Alkeran, than is normally given intravenously, they said.
NEWS
April 9, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Researchers have already uncovered worrying signs that exposure to traffic - and the vehicle emissions that come with it - can increase a child's risk of developing asthma and autism . Now comes evidence that it may make children more susceptible to certain kinds of cancers. Researchers used the California Department of Transportation's computer model of traffic-related air pollution to estimate pollution exposure in communities across the state. They also used the California Cancer Registry to identify 3,590 children born between 1998 and 2007 who were diagnosed with some type of cancer.
NEWS
September 26, 1985 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
A new potential danger for sun worshipers--eye cancer--has been identified by medical researchers. And they urge people in southern climates who spend a great deal of time outdoors to wear hats, visors and good quality sunglasses that cut out at least 99% of ultraviolet rays.
BUSINESS
March 5, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
Rancho Feeding Corp., the Bay Area slaughterhouse that recalled nearly 9 million pounds of beef products last month, sold some meat that came from cows with eye cancer, according to documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act. Meat processed by Rancho Feeding was sold to thousands of retail stores, including Kroger, Food 4 Less and Wal-Mart as well as smaller meat markets that cater to Latino customers. The Rancho Feeding recall has also led to a voluntary recall by Nestle of its Philly Steak and Cheese flavored Hot Pockets after it discovered a supplier had bought meat from Rancho Feeding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Researchers from Childrens Hospital Los Angeles say they have developed the most significant advance in the treatment of retinoblastoma--a genetically caused eye cancer--in 40 years. Dr. A. Linn Murphree and Dr. Judith Villablanca report in this month's Archives of Ophthalmology that they were able to successfully treat 170 young patients with the technique, which involves intensive chemotherapy, without using significant amounts of radiation.
HEALTH
June 30, 2003 | Garret Condon, Hartford Courant
Ray-Ban is promoting three styles of sunglasses "that represent the spirit of each angel" in the sequel "Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle." These designer shades will share the shelves with sunglasses from "The Matrix Reloaded" and will compete next month with Sama Eyewear's "Terminator 3" sunglasses. Promoting the use of sunglasses may be Hollywood's biggest contribution to the well-being of moviegoers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1990 | Compiled from Times staff and wire reports
An anti-cancer gene that helps guard against lung and breast cancer may perform its lifesaving function by shutting down a gene that helps stimulate cell growth, researchers said last week. Researchers have suspected that an anti-cancer gene, called the retinoblastoma gene, might act by shutting off one or more cell-growth genes. But they didn't know which ones.
SPORTS
March 19, 2012 | By Mark Medina
In less than a week, Derek Fisher went from leading the Lakers locker room to suddenly looking for work. The Houston Rocketsofficially waived him Monday, four days after the Lakers traded Fisher and a first-round pick for Jordan Hill. Under the new collective bargaining agreement, Fisher can sign with any team except for the Lakers once he clears waivers Wednesday. A statement released through his business manager Sunday evening indicated Fisher reached a buyout with the Rockets partly because "Derek's desire to win a sixth championship is what drives him and will continue to drive him as he moves forward.
SPORTS
March 19, 2012 | By Mark Medina
In less than a week, Derek Fisher went from leading the Lakers locker room to suddenly looking for work. The Houston Rocketsofficially waived him Monday, four days after the Lakers traded Fisher and a first-round pick for Jordan Hill. Under the new collective bargaining agreement, Fisher can sign with any team except for the Lakers once he clears waivers Wednesday. A statement released through his business manager Sunday evening indicated Fisher reached a buyout with the Rockets partly because "Derek's desire to win a sixth championship is what drives him and will continue to drive him as he moves forward.
NEWS
January 12, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
It was a photo of 8-month-old Brendan Shannon that provided the most telling evidence that something was wrong with one of his eyes. The problem was noticeable but not enough to ring alarm bells for his parents. That would come later. Brendan was diagnosed with retinoblastoma, an eye cancer that can give the eye a milky-white appearance. In this Chicago Tribune story, his mother says only after an initial diagnosis did she go back and look at photos of her young son. "I wanted to throw up," said Danielle, 31, a former graphic designer.
SPORTS
May 4, 2008 | Bill Plaschke
Her eyes are his eyes. On the bad days, when little Tatum Fisher can't stop crying and can't begin to understand, Derek Fisher's clear eyes cloud. "Sometimes in the morning, I want to call Phil and tell him I just can't make the shoot-around, I just need to be home," he says. "But as one of this team's leaders, that's not something I can do."
SCIENCE
March 22, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An experimental technique for a rare eye cancer has saved some children from losing their eyes and even restored vision in a few cases, U.S. researchers said this week at a Washington meeting of the Society for Interventional Radiology. After threading a catheter through the body to the eye, doctors delivered a drug directly to retinoblastoma tumors through an artery. This allowed them to administer a much larger dose of the chemotherapy drug melphalan, made by GlaxoSmithKline under the brand name Alkeran, than is normally given intravenously, they said.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2007 | From Reuters
Genentech Inc. said Wednesday that its fourth-quarter profit jumped 75% on surging sales of Lucentis, its new treatment for the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, and rising demand for its cancer drugs. Its shares rose 1.6% after hours. Lucentis, which was almost immediately adopted as the first treatment option for age-related macular degeneration, has been vanquishing the competition since its June approval.
HEALTH
June 30, 2003 | Garret Condon, Hartford Courant
Ray-Ban is promoting three styles of sunglasses "that represent the spirit of each angel" in the sequel "Charlie's Angels: Full Throttle." These designer shades will share the shelves with sunglasses from "The Matrix Reloaded" and will compete next month with Sama Eyewear's "Terminator 3" sunglasses. Promoting the use of sunglasses may be Hollywood's biggest contribution to the well-being of moviegoers.
NEWS
April 9, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Researchers have already uncovered worrying signs that exposure to traffic - and the vehicle emissions that come with it - can increase a child's risk of developing asthma and autism . Now comes evidence that it may make children more susceptible to certain kinds of cancers. Researchers used the California Department of Transportation's computer model of traffic-related air pollution to estimate pollution exposure in communities across the state. They also used the California Cancer Registry to identify 3,590 children born between 1998 and 2007 who were diagnosed with some type of cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1987 | TOM GORMAN, Times Staff Writer
Nevin Musgrave figures that when it comes to tandem bicycle racing, he's got about the best possible partner pedaling behind him. A blind man. And Ray Patterson--who is that blind man--thinks he's finally found a sport in which he can participate with absolutely no handicap. After all, when you're stoking from the rear and hunched over so your nose is just about touching your partner's tail bone, what's there to see?
SCIENCE
January 24, 2003 | Rosie Mestel, Times Staff Writer
In vitro fertilization has birthed a million babies worldwide, but now there are glimmerings of concern that the 25-year-old technology and other methods known collectively as assisted reproductive technology are causing several rare medical abnormalities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1996 | From Times staff and wire reports
Researchers from Childrens Hospital Los Angeles say they have developed the most significant advance in the treatment of retinoblastoma--a genetically caused eye cancer--in 40 years. Dr. A. Linn Murphree and Dr. Judith Villablanca report in this month's Archives of Ophthalmology that they were able to successfully treat 170 young patients with the technique, which involves intensive chemotherapy, without using significant amounts of radiation.
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