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BUSINESS
August 12, 1992 | Anne Michaud, Times staff writer
Sunglass maker Ray-Ban was spending big bucks on advertising during the Olympics, but it was Irvine-based Oakley sunglasses that captured the best spots. Several athletes, including decathlon bronze-medalist Dave Johnson, wore Oakley's glasses during their television appearances. "Dave Johnson we've been working with a couple of years, but a lot of the rest were surprises," said Jim Jannard, advertising director for Oakley.
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BUSINESS
October 4, 2013 | By Andrea Chang
Google Glass has been hogging the spotlight when it comes to eyewear, but get ready to see new technology designed for those stuck with old-fashioned prescription eyeglasses. About 64% of Americans wear glasses to improve vision. Many can't stand them, complaining that glasses are cumbersome, headache-inducing or don't work in all situations. Meanwhile, the growing amount of time people spend in front of computers and mobile devices has also raised concern about the potential damaging effects on eyesight.
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BUSINESS
October 4, 2013 | By Andrea Chang
Google Glass has been hogging the spotlight when it comes to eyewear, but get ready to see new technology designed for those stuck with old-fashioned prescription eyeglasses. About 64% of Americans wear glasses to improve vision. Many can't stand them, complaining that glasses are cumbersome, headache-inducing or don't work in all situations. Meanwhile, the growing amount of time people spend in front of computers and mobile devices has also raised concern about the potential damaging effects on eyesight.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2013 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
A wristwatch that reads your text messages out loud, a jacket that heats up when you're cold, eyeglasses that display directions as you walk down the street. Gimmicks, or fashion of the future? Although those products may seem like something out of a James Bond movie, the world's largest technology companies and start-ups alike believe "wearable tech" is the next big frontier, and they have been pouring money and research into developing high-tech clothing and accessories.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2013 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
A wristwatch that reads your text messages out loud, a jacket that heats up when you're cold, eyeglasses that display directions as you walk down the street. Gimmicks, or fashion of the future? Although those products may seem like something out of a James Bond movie, the world's largest technology companies and start-ups alike believe "wearable tech" is the next big frontier, and they have been pouring money and research into developing high-tech clothing and accessories.
NEWS
February 28, 1993 | DONNA LARCEN, THE HARTFORD COURANT
Once upon a time, corrective lenses made their own kind of peculiar fashion statement: nerd, owl, egghead, four-eyes. "Now we're in a time where two forces come together: fashion and function," says Carl Zyskowski of Civic Center Opticians in Connecticut. Corrective was the operative word before high-style designers lent their names to frame shapes and technology married old-style etched metal with lightweight tortoise-pattern plastic in almost any shade imaginable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1997
People helping people: I would like to thank the Simi Valley Lions Club and Opel and Ken Moreland and Neil Diamond, optometrist, for their act of kindness in providing me with a special pair of eyeglasses. I recently lost my 25-year profession as a trucker due to diabetes and other health problems. These people have helped me far beyond my ability to afford eyeglasses. It's nice to know there is help out there for people having tough times. RICK GREEN Simi Valley
REAL ESTATE
September 7, 1986
Ask any optician how he can tell if a glass for eyeglasses is heat treated--tempered "Safety Glass Law to Affect Escrows" (Aug. 24). He would look at it with a polariscope. With a glass door you could hold Polaroid eyeglasses on each side and look through and move lenses about at the same time. Sunlight on a thick glass door at a bank, for example, will look like dark areas all over it, about three inches apart. AL ASHWORTH San Clemente
WORLD
July 23, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A German firm has begun offering eyeglasses with detachable frame arms that double as chopsticks or forks so sushi fans can eat on the go. "The idea came from the common need for cutlery at any time," said "ic! berlin" company director Ralph Anderl, who uses the frames. They cost $330 or more and are made from lightweight stainless steel that fits together without screws.
NEWS
October 13, 1988 | DR. NEIL SOLOMON
Question: My father was told he has neuropathy, and all I know about it is that it has something to do with the nerves. I'd like to be helpful, but I need more information. Answer: Neuropathy may affect the nerves in the arms, hands, feet, legs and eyes, as well as most of the major body organs. Although the exact cause of the condition is not known, the patient's metabolism (the manner in which the body uses food as energy) and changes in blood vessels have been implicated in its development.
NATIONAL
September 7, 2012 | By Tina Susman
Vitaly Borker was an Internet shopper's "worst nightmare," according to prosecutors, who say he terrorized unhappy customers of his eyeglass business with threats of rape, assault and even murder if they complained about his shoddy products. "I hope you fall off a ladder and break your head ... I pee on your negative [comments]," he told one angry buyer, according to a federal indictment. "I can hurt you," he told another. But on Thursday, the man who gave new meaning to the term "lousy customer service" saw his alleged threats come back to haunt him as a federal court judge sentenced Borker to four years in prison for sending threatening emails and for wire and mail fraud.
IMAGE
July 22, 2012 | By Alisha Gomez
Thirty-four-year-old Van de la Plante looks every bit the gentleman. Sporting a beige linen resort suit, a green Cuban guayabera cigar shirt and Cole Haan huarache sandals, De la Plante fits in well as owner of Gentlemen's Breakfast, a new boutique in Laguna Beach that sells antique eyeglasses, sunglasses and accessories. The small shop, splattered in bitter chocolate and beige tones, is decorated with manly finds and furnishings. Antique crystal decanters sit on an old desk, filled with Scotch and ready for the pour.
IMAGE
April 29, 2012 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
Judging from the plethora of eye-catching eyewear that's been getting face time over the last few years - be it on the European ready-to-wear runways or in the adjoining office cubicle - it's clear that glasses have gone from nerd necessity to chic accessory. It's a shift reflected in the current look-at-me trends - retro, vintage-inspired frames, chunky tortoise shells and geometric shapes that attract rather than deflect attention - and reinforced by the laundry list of fashion-focused brands with a presence in the eyewear arena.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2012 | By Jasmine Elist, Los Angeles Times
Even in Hollywood, it's rare for anyone to be able to boast a connection to dozens of Oscar-contending films and blockbusters over the last 25 years. But Russ Campbell can hardly turn on the television or go to a movie theater without seeing something he's made a mark on — including the high-profile films "J. Edgar," "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy," "The Rum Diary," "Cowboys & Aliens," "A Single Man," "Catch Me if You Can" and "The Curious Case of Benjamin Button," as well as such TV shows as "Mad Men. " Campbell isn't a big-shot producer or a studio honcho.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2011 | By Brandon Bailey
SAN JOSE, Calif. — If you're over 45 and wear glasses, you've probably got more than one pair. Or you're using bifocals or progressive lenses. As most people get older, their eyes have more trouble focusing on objects that are close, which is why you need that extra help for things like sewing, drawing — or reading this article. But it's a hassle to juggle multiple pairs of specs. And some wearers of traditional progressive lenses find their vision can be blurred or distorted in certain situations, such as when they look down at the ground.
NEWS
February 3, 2011 | By Noam N. Levey, Washington Bureau
Facing a brewing revolt among states wrestling with massive budget shortfalls and tattering healthcare safety nets, the Obama administration is intensifying a drive to help state leaders find ways to wring savings from their Medicaid programs. Thursday, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius sent a letter to the nation's 50 governors suggesting a range of cuts they can make to Medicaid, including dropping some people from the program. "I know you are struggling to balance your budget while still providing critical healthcare services to those who need it most," Sebelius told governors in the letter.
NEWS
November 29, 1987
Authorities are searching for a 7-year-old Northern California boy, missing since Friday from Whiskey's Pete's casino arcade in Jean, Nev., near the California border. Alexander Harris of Mountain View was last seen by his grandfather, Ralph DeBolt, in a hall outside the arcade. DeBolt said several witnesses saw the boy leave the arcade with a man about 35 years old and they did nothing because it appeared to be a father-son duo.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1988 | GEORGE WHITE and LARGEST CHAINS and In number of stores and Rank Retailer Stores 1) LensCrafters 262 2) Pearle Health Svcs. 91 3) Eye Care Centers 60 4) Cole National 58 5) Opti-World 33 6) D&K Optical 20 7) Eyear 18 8) Nu Vision 17 9) New Deal 16 10) D.O.C. Optics 14 and Source: 20/20 magazine
Eye frame manufacturers are teaming up with celebrities and designers to sell consumers on a new notion: It's un fashionable to own only one pair of eyeglasses. Now, clothes designer Giorgio Armani is plunging into a field already crowded with celebrity name tags to sell more eyeglasses for an Italian frame maker. "They're looking for strategies to get consumers to buy more than one pair," said Marc Ferrara, editor of Optical Index, a trade publication.
IMAGE
January 17, 2010 | By Max Padilla
When Garrett Leight discovered 2-decade-old Oliver Peoples eyeglass frames in a retired preppy style in his mother Cindy's garage in Sacramento on Thanksgiving 2008, it was just the prompt he needed to open his own business. Leight, the son of Oliver Peoples founder Larry Leight, had worked in the family business for a few years, first as an intern and then as a full-time employee. But finding the vintage frames led him to open A. Kinney Court in Venice to draw on a cache of dead-stock Oliver Peoples eyeglasses that had been squirreled away in storage units, including a one-off sculptural pair made in 1987 for Andy Warhol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 2009 | Monte Morin
Los Angeles Police Department detectives are asking for the public's help in identifying an armed man who has robbed more than a dozen sandwich and retail shops in South Los Angeles. The man, whom authorities have dubbed the "Left-Handed Eyeglass Bandit," typically walks in the front door of a business, draws a small-caliber revolver with his left hand and demands money from the clerk. Police described the robber as an African American man in his 30s, who is 5 feet 10 and weighs between 160 and 190 pounds.
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