Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEyesore
IN THE NEWS

Eyesore

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2003
MARY McNamara getting all warm and fuzzy about storage facilities ("Where Dreamers and Pack Rats Rule," April 29) was bad enough. However, showing a photo of the hideous Public Storage building in Glassell Park with a caption calling it "a pretty sight" waves a red flag at the charging bull of public opinion in that neighborhood. Once the gateway of Glassell Park, the intersection of Verdugo Road and Eagle Rock Boulevard presented a breathtaking view of "the seven hills," a beautiful, natural feature of the northeast corner of Los Angeles.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 5, 2013 | By Donie Vanitzian
Question: There's an overall deterioration in our homeowners association, and we're ashamed of the deplorable eyesores throughout the complex. There are cracks in the concrete and plaster and peeling paint everywhere. All the trees need more soil as exposed roots are cause for liability. The stairs have ragged or missing safety strips; gates have ugly, dated signs; patio tables and pool furniture are filthy; and there are corroded and rotting wood trellises and dying foliage.
Advertisement
SPORTS
June 21, 2009
OPINION
March 24, 2013 | By the Los Angeles Times editorial board
Sherwood Forest is not a neighborhood of merry men and women these days. For the last several months, the leafy enclave of rambling homes in Northridge in the San Fernando Valley has been the site of a pitched battle between developers who want to build a 112-unit elder care facility and opponents who complain that the "Costco-size" institution will be an eyesore, and an unnecessary one at that, in a community zoned for single-family dwellings....
SPORTS
February 17, 2010 | By Chris Erskine
Vancouver's best photo op may finally be getting a grander stage. Organizers on Wednesday are expected to announce changes to the fencing surrounding the Olympic caldron after residents and visitors complained that the unsightly chain link ruined the view of the popular waterfront attraction. "This fence is offensive," said Jeffrey Paleczny, one of thousands of visitors angling for a view earlier this week. Among the options: replacing the chain-link fences with Plexiglas and moving the perimeter closer to the flames.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2009 | Associated Press
When Vicky Black's one-story home in Port Richey, Fla., was on the market, prospective buyers told her they liked it. Unfortunately, they made negative comments about her neighbor's home, which has a stone lawn and little curb appeal. "They said I was the gem of the neighborhood, and it was too bad I had eyesores around me," recalled Black, who took her house off the market last year. The appearance of nearby homes absolutely influences homeowners' ability to sell, said Pat Vredevoogd Combs, former president of the National Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2011 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
For more than three years, residents of a quiet west San Fernando Valley neighborhood watched as a house on their street grew shabbier and shabbier. At one time, the 1,160-square-foot house on Kittridge Street in West Hills had been immaculately maintained, neighbors recalled. But then its original owner died and his son took over the house. The younger man began inviting others to stay there. Occupants and their cars came and went at all hours, neighbors said. Soon, the new homeowner decided to enlarge the house.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2002 | WILLIAM OVEREND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The showdown was only minutes away, and there was an edge to the crowd. They filed into the school auditorium, made their choices among the bottled waters, the little wrapped mints, the Guatemalan roast and Costa Rican decaf, then settled into their seats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1987
I am writing to let you know that the article "Cure for an Eyesore" (Sept. 27) was one of the most misleading pieces of journalism I have ever read. The title and some of the information within would have one believe that all is well with the biggest eyesore Huntington Beach has ever seen. Far from being on its way to becoming a model portion of the community, the Commodore Circle area will continue to be an eyesore. The only time something positive will happen to this cul-de-sac is when all the buildings are torn down, and the lots are sold to someone who will develop it to look like the rest of the area surrounding it. I was darned lucky to sell my property (which took years)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1991
One look at Gehry's design and one wonders if the whole world has gone mad. The exterior design could be best described as a littered eyesore that required immediate attention from our Sanitation Department. EDWARD T. YERKEY Westlake Village
BUSINESS
December 25, 2012 | By Shan Li, Los Angeles Times
The tipsy crowd leaned in to take a gander at contestant No. 1: Natalie Novoa was sporting a flashing Christmas sweater bedazzled with pompoms, sequins and a stuffed gingerbread man. With Christmas fast approaching, she twirled on a chair showing off her forest green pullover as it twinkled red, blue and green - lighting up the dark Silver Lake bar. She was vying with four other holiday-hued patrons this week for the coveted title of "ugliest holiday...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2012 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
BAKER - The temperature hit 114 degrees in July, but most folks passing by the "World's Tallest Thermometer" in this Mojave Desert pit stop never knew it. Once a shimmering beacon of light to Las Vegas-bound drivers heading up Interstate 15 with fat wallets and paper-thin dreams, Baker's 13-story thermometer marks California's last-stop oasis of bathrooms and burger joints before the Nevada state line. Now it's an eyesore. The pinkish roadside oddity has been on the blink for years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2012 | Steve Lopez
As public eyesores go, the 2-acre disaster across the street from L.A. City Hall is a marvel. About 20 dust-crusted feral cats keep watch over a dilapidated bunker that appears to have been the target of an aerial bombing. From street level, tourists and locals alike are treated to a putrid stench and a doomed, graffiti-scarred landscape of neglected plants begging to die, a bounty of trash their only crop. Perhaps most amazing, though, is how long the property has been this way, a mere mayor's toss away from the city's symbolic seat of power and civic virtue, not to mention the Los Angeles Times' mother ship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2012 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
They weren't the most flattering addition to the neighborhood, and three years after the devastating Station fire the foothills of La Crescenta are bidding farewell to nearly half a mile of concrete barriers installed to guard against mudslides. The K-rails, as they're known, were put in place in La Crescenta and La Cañada Flintridge soon after the fire burned more than 160,000 acres, incinerating trees and shrubbery on hillsides that typically kept mud from spilling into homes during heavy rains.
WORLD
August 20, 2011 | By John M. Glionna, Los Angeles Times
For a quarter of a century, Kim Un-tae has found comfort in the red neon cross that sits atop the steeple of the Protestant church he founded here. For the 70-year-old holy man, the soft glow of the religious icon has always signified that his faith was open for anyone willing to enter the doors of his church. "It's like a coastal lighthouse for passing ships in the dark," Kim said. Yet critics say church crosses like Kim's are just another form of light pollution. Tens of thousands of churches dot South Korea, most with their own red neon crosses.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2011 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
Donna and Bob Moran moved to the wind-whipped foothills here four years ago looking for solitude and serenity amid the pinyon pines and towering Joshua trees. But lately their view of the valley is being marred by a growing swarm of whirring wind turbines — many taller than the Statue of Liberty — sweeping ever closer to their home. "Once, you could see stars like you wouldn't believe," Donna Moran said. "Now, with the lights from the turbines, you can't even see the night sky. " It's about to get worse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1995
Thank you for your editorials and concise reporting regarding the Elsmere Canyon landfill situation. The Elsmere site (10 miles north of Sylmar) will not only be an eyesore to the pristine forest area but might permanently contaminate the water supply underneath the landfill, causing indeterminable and irreversible health damage to residents. In addition, Placerita Canyon County Park neighbors the landfill site and would be ruined by the smell, eyesore and health risks caused by trash dumping.
BUSINESS
July 19, 1992
As the story "Graffiti Central" (July 9) points out, the proposal to fill a city park with a wall of graffiti is indeed wacky. It is also unbelievable that someone would want to encourage this practice. Graffiti is vandalism and nothing more. The environmental damage done by this despicable practice is evident everywhere. Asking companies to finance this project when they already spend thousands of dollars trying to remove it is ludicrous. Using Arroyo Seco Park for this purpose would create an eyesore in what is now a beautiful area.
HOME & GARDEN
July 16, 2011 | By Lisa Boone, Los Angeles Times
When Amy Lippman first called her architect about renovating a Carpinteria beach house she had just bought, she tried to find humor in the design challenge ahead by asking: "Do you want to work on a Taco Bell?" The house wasn't really a fast-food drive-through, of course, but a 1977 stucco box with unfortunate architectural flourishes. Lippman's husband, Rodman Flender, thought she was nuts. After viewing the property for the first time, Los Angeles architect Rachel Allen had to agree with her client's initial assessment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2011 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
For more than three years, residents of a quiet west San Fernando Valley neighborhood watched as a house on their street grew shabbier and shabbier. At one time, the 1,160-square-foot house on Kittridge Street in West Hills had been immaculately maintained, neighbors recalled. But then its original owner died and his son took over the house. The younger man began inviting others to stay there. Occupants and their cars came and went at all hours, neighbors said. Soon, the new homeowner decided to enlarge the house.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|