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Ezell

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1989 | MARITA HERNANDEZ, Times Staff Writer
Immigration officials, acknowledging that response to the second stage of the amnesty program has gotten off to an alarmingly slow start, unveiled measures Thursday aimed at easing the application process. "We're not quite sure if it is confusion or procrastination," but only about 13% of eligible applicants have bothered to file for permanent resident status so far, Harold Ezell, western regional commissioner of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, said at a press conference.
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NEWS
February 19, 1989
I can't believe what I have just read (Times, Feb. 12). The League of United Latin American Citizens in Bellflower is honoring Harold Ezell, (regional commissioner of the U. S. Immigration and Naturalization Service). Apparently the Bellflower LULAC members have never listened to Mr. Ezell's insensitive remarks on television. Far less have they witnessed or experienced the rude, insensitive and mean manner that people are confronted with at the Immigration and Naturalization Service offices in downtown Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1989
Leaders of local Latino groups gathered Monday to announce their plans to picket another Latino group's reception this week for Harold W. Ezell, regional commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service.
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
The Bellflower chapter of a national Latino organization has drawn heavy criticism from other members of the group for planning a reception to honor the West's top immigration official. The League of United Latin American Citizens in Bellflower announced plans to pay tribute to Harold W. Ezell, Western regional commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, for "outstanding service in 'bridging the gap' between the Hispanic community and the INS."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
Harold Ezell, the top immigration official in the West, may have gained scores of new Latino friends with his sombrero-toting support of the amnesty program last year. But he probably could not find too many amigos within the League of United Latin American Citizens--or LULAC--some of whose members have been calling for Ezell's ouster. Unless, that is, the western regional commissioner of the U.S.
NEWS
December 1, 1988 | Associated Press
Regional Immigration Commissioner Harold Ezell warned farmers today to be careful not to hire illegal aliens now that the deadline to file for amnesty has passed. Ezell noted that 34,000 people applied for amnesty under the Special Agricultural Worker program in the western region on Wednesday alone, the last day applications could be filed.
NEWS
November 19, 1988 | PATRICK McDONNELL, Times Staff Writer
Former Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos was contesting an order by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service sharply curtailing his travel rights at a time when he hosted a dinner party for top INS officials at his Honolulu residence last summer. INS officials, including Western Regional Commissioner Harold Ezell, have defended their appearance at a dinner at the Marcos home last Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 1988 | PATRICK McDONNELL, Times Staff Writer
Harold Ezell, the top federal immigration official in California, lashed out Saturday at officials in San Diego and other cities where police forces have refused to cooperate with efforts to detain suspected illegal aliens. Ezell called the San Diego policy "outrageous" and called on city officials to institute joint patrols of U.S. Border Patrol and local police units in areas such as Balboa Park, where authorities say illegal aliens have committed crimes.
NEWS
October 21, 1988 | JOSEPH N. BELL
In the summer of 1987, an East Los Angeles priest led 200 parishioners on a crusade to the Laguna Hills home of Harold Ezell, western regional commissioner for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. In surroundings as foreign to their own living conditions as a distant planet, the demonstrators sang hymns and prayed for 2 hours that they might have a grace period to prevent their families from being divided by deportation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1988 | BOB SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
U. S. Border Patrol agents in San Diego and elsewhere in California will not pursue suspected illegal aliens into churches without first obtaining the permission of both their own supervisor and church representatives, a top immigration official said Monday. The revised policy, enacted in response to a controversial case in Orange County last month, will also apply to suspected illegal aliens who are in schools and hospitals, a spokesman said.
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