Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEzra Raiten
IN THE NEWS

Ezra Raiten

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1991 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after an unsuccessful attempt to buy Paramount Ranch in Agoura, former home of the Renaissance Pleasure Faire, state park officials may wrest the scenic tract from developers through an unusual deal approved Monday night by the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy. Under the tentative agreement with Union Federal Savings Bank, the conservancy will buy delinquent loans on the 320-acre tract, and then foreclose on a development firm that is millions of dollars in arrears.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1991 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after an unsuccessful attempt to buy Paramount Ranch in Agoura, former home of the Renaissance Pleasure Faire, state park officials may wrest the scenic tract from developers through an unusual deal approved Monday night by the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy. Under the tentative agreement with Union Federal Savings Bank, the conservancy will buy delinquent loans on the 320-acre tract, and then foreclose on a development firm that is millions of dollars in arrears.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1990 | MICHAEL CONNELLY and TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Northridge developer killed in a plane crash in San Luis Obispo Monday was known in the San Fernando Valley for generating controversies as both a builder and a pilot. In recent years Ezra Raiten, 38, and his companies were involved in disputes with environmentalists over his plans to develop the scenic Paramount Ranch in the Santa Monica Mountains and accusations that he had little regard for trees and a possibly historic structure on another property he was developing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1990 | MICHAEL CONNELLY and TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Northridge developer killed in a plane crash in San Luis Obispo Monday was known in the San Fernando Valley for generating controversies as both a builder and a pilot. In recent years Ezra Raiten, 38, and his companies were involved in disputes with environmentalists over his plans to develop the scenic Paramount Ranch in the Santa Monica Mountains and accusations that he had little regard for trees and a possibly historic structure on another property he was developing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1990
The developer of a West Hills housing tract has been barred from selling his luxury homes until he replaces three large oak trees that vanished from the construction site, Los Angeles City Councilwoman Joy Picus said Thursday. Picus said she will also ask the city attorney's office to prosecute developer Ezra Raiten on misdemeanor charges of violating a city ordinance designed to preserve oak trees. As part of an agreement with the city, Raiten was to relocate the oaks to a nearby lot.
NEWS
September 25, 1990 | MICHAEL CONNELLY and JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The head of a firm involved in the controversial development of Paramount Ranch and three other people were killed Monday morning when their private jet crashed while attempting to land in heavy fog at San Luis Obispo Municipal Airport, authorities said. On Monday evening, two people died when their plane smashed into the foothills north of the San Gabriel Valley city of Claremont. Names of the victims were not released pending notification of relatives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1989 | GABE FUENTES, Times Staff Writer
There are places where helicopter landings are allowed, but Northridge yards are not among them. Ezra Raiten, 37, a developer, was cited by the Los Angeles Fire Department on Friday for landing a helicopter in his back yard without a city permit. Neighbors complained to police about four takeoffs and landings Friday afternoon and at least one incident Thursday and another Sunday, Fire Capt. James Gaffney said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1990 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It might be called the case of the vanishing oaks. And if Los Angeles City Councilwoman Joy Picus has her way, solving it could send a local developer to jail. The problem occurred at La Villa Nueva housing tract, at Cohasset Street in West Hills, where developer Ezra Raiten has built a gated community of 72 houses. The houses sell for up to $600,000 each.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1992 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The former Renaissance Pleasure Faire site in Agoura, long threatened by development, became parkland Thursday in a deal officials said may mark the first use of foreclosure to create a public preserve. Officials with the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy, a state parks agency, said they acquired formal title Thursday to the hilly, 314-acre swath of oaks and grassland, which is expected to be combined with adjacent holdings of the National Park Service.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1991 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after an unsuccessful attempt to buy the Paramount Ranch in Agoura, former home of the Renaissance Pleasure Faire, state park officials may yet wrest the scenic tract from developers through an unusual deal approved Monday night by the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy. Under the tentative agreement with Union Federal Savings Bank of Brea, the conservancy will buy delinquent loans on the 320-acre tract, and then foreclose on a development firm that is millions of dollars in arrears.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1991 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A complex transaction between a parks agency and a bank has all but assured the preservation of Paramount Ranch in Agoura, the former Renaissance Faire site long threatened with development, officials said Thursday. Under the deal concluded this week, the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy purchased delinquent loans on the 314-acre tract and will foreclose on a development firm that is millions of dollars in arrears.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1990 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Superior Court judge ruled Friday that Los Angeles County acted legally in approving the Paramount Ranch development in Agoura, handing a stinging defeat to opponents who claimed the controversial luxury house development did not get an adequate environmental review. Under the ruling by Judge David P. Yaffe, construction could start soon on the scenic, oak-studded parcel where the Renaissance Pleasure Faire formerly was held.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|