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F 16 Airplane

NEWS
August 27, 1991 | H.G. REZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Structural cracks in the F-16 N Falcon aircraft, used to train Navy pilots, have forced the cancellation of the class at the famed Top Gun fighter pilot school, officials said Monday. Navy pilots attending the school at the Miramar Naval Air Station fly the F-16s to simulate battle between U.S. and Soviet combat planes. "They can't do it (the training) without the F-16s. Right now, they're trying to look at some alternatives to use as adversarial trainers," said Cmdr.
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NEWS
July 24, 1991 | Associated Press
The Air Force on Tuesday confirmed that it has discovered cracks in some of its F-16 Falcon fighter planes and called them relatively minor, not enough to ground the fleet. Capt. George Sillia, an Air Force spokesman, said that cracks were found in 10 F-16s operated by the U.S. Air Force and in 10 F-16s sold to other countries that he could not immediately identify. The cracks are at a point where the wing attaches to the plane's body.
BUSINESS
March 29, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Korea canceled its order to buy 120 McDonnell Douglas F-18 jet fighters Thursday, selecting instead the less costly General Dynamics F-16 in a deal potentially worth $5.2 billion. The reversal, which came as a stunning surprise not only to industry observers but even to McDonnell, could help General Dynamics sustain employment at its Ft. Worth plant, which has been hit hard by layoffs over the past year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1991 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pilot of an Air Force F-16 was trying to urinate in a cockpit device when the $20-million plane went out of control at 28,000 feet and crashed at Palmdale Regional Airport in December, an Air Force report said Friday. The report describes the events leading up to the Dec. 1 accident, but it does not assign blame for the crash.
NEWS
February 10, 1991 | Michael Meyers
Despite the destruction of 33 Iraqi aircraft in the Gulf War so far, only a few of the engagements have involved the close and complex aerial combat that characterizes dogfights. Many of the other enemy craft have been downed without the elaborate maneuvering that is associated with Top Gun-type flying. In one of the first dogfights of the war, U.S. F-15 pilot Capt. Steve Tate locked in on an Iraqi F-1 Mirage that was on the tail of another U.S. F-15.
NEWS
January 17, 1991
The enormous concentration of U.S. weapons in the gulf features some of the world's most advanced airplanes and helicopters. Deployed from land bases and U.S. aircraft carriers in the Persian Gulf region, these aircraft offer allied forces decisive first-strike capabilities. Sensitive targets in Iraq Major Iraqi Air Bases: Irbil, Basra, Habbaniyah, An Nasiriyah, Kirkuk, Mosul, Shu-aiba, H-3, H-2. Major Nuclear Power Plants: Basra, Dibis, Baghdad.
NEWS
September 16, 1990 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beneath the clear, blue skies above the Saudi Arabian desert, there is a bureaucratic skirmish being waged, and it has pitted one of the Air Force's sleekest war birds, the F-16 Falcon, against an ungainly beast called "the Warthog" by the pilots who fly it. Their role is to destroy any tanks bearing down on U.S. forces, and the debate is over how it should be done and who should do it. The Iraqi military threat to Saudi Arabia, which would set one of the world's largest tank armies against U.S.
BUSINESS
February 22, 1990 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Air Force understated its cost on the B-1 bomber by $7.5 billion and on two other aircraft programs by an additional $18 billion, according to a draft General Accounting Office report that found that the Air Force's accounting practices have "significant internal control weaknesses." The GAO disclosed, for example, that when the Air Force Space Division in Los Angeles found a $2.
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