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BUSINESS
July 11, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Recent troubles with the Air Force's fleet of F-22 Raptor fighter jets have prompted fresh questions by two members of Congress looking for answers on the oxygen problems that have plagued the aircraft for years. F-22 pilots have reported dozens of incidents in which the jet's systems weren't feeding them a proper amount of oxygen in flight, causing hypoxia-like symptoms. Hypoxia is a condition that can cause nausea, headaches, fatigue or even blackouts. On Tuesday, Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.)
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NATIONAL
February 13, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
The Department of Defense inspector general has questioned an Air Force report of its investigation that blamed the pilot for the 2010 crash of an F-22 Raptor fighter jet. In its report released on Monday, the inspector general's office questioned the original findings of the Air Force's Accident Investigation Board (AIB) report on the F-22 crash. “The AIB Statement of Opinion regarding the cause of the mishap was not supported by the facts within the AIB report consistent with the clear and convincing standard of proof,” according to the inspector general's report.
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BUSINESS
July 24, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta has approved a plan to begin lifting flight restrictions that he placed on the Air Force's problem-plagued fleet of F-22 Raptor fighter jets. Since 2008, F-22 pilots have reported more than a dozen incidents in which they experienced hypoxia-like symptoms in the air. Hypoxia is a condition that can bring on nausea, headaches, fatigue or blackouts. In May, Panetta ordered that any flights in a F-22 “will remain within the proximity of potential landing locations to enable quick recovery and landing should the pilot encounter unanticipated physiological conditions during flight.
NATIONAL
November 16, 2012 | By Joseph Serna
An Air Force pilot who was hospitalized after his jet crashed at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida is in good condition and has been released, military officials said Friday. At about 3:30 p.m. Thursday the pilot was returning from a routine training mission in an F-22 Raptor -- considered the most advanced fighter jet in the world -- when he alerted people on the ground of an emergency and then ejected, base officials said. The $143-million jet, designed by Lockheed Martin Corp., slammed into a grassy field about a quarter-mile east of a drone runway.
NATIONAL
November 16, 2012 | By Joseph Serna
An Air Force pilot who was hospitalized after his jet crashed at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida is in good condition and has been released, military officials said Friday. At about 3:30 p.m. Thursday the pilot was returning from a routine training mission in an F-22 Raptor -- considered the most advanced fighter jet in the world -- when he alerted people on the ground of an emergency and then ejected, base officials said. The $143-million jet, designed by Lockheed Martin Corp., slammed into a grassy field about a quarter-mile east of a drone runway.
NATIONAL
February 13, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
The Department of Defense inspector general has questioned an Air Force report of its investigation that blamed the pilot for the 2010 crash of an F-22 Raptor fighter jet. In its report released on Monday, the inspector general's office questioned the original findings of the Air Force's Accident Investigation Board (AIB) report on the F-22 crash. “The AIB Statement of Opinion regarding the cause of the mishap was not supported by the facts within the AIB report consistent with the clear and convincing standard of proof,” according to the inspector general's report.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
The Air Force will modify the handle that engages the emergency oxygen system in its entire fleet of F-22 Raptor fighter jets after a report found that it played a role in a crash that killed one of its top aviators. The changes come as Anna Haney, the pilot's widow, filed a wrongful-death lawsuit againstLockheed Martin Corp.and subcontractors that designed and built the nation's most expensive fighter jet. Capt. Jeff Haney, 31, died when his F-22 crashed in the Alaskan wilderness in November 2010.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. Air Force's F-22 Raptor fighter jets have been cleared for takeoff after a government safety investigation grounded the entire fleet for more than four months. The Air Force said that all 170 F-22s will be inspected before flight operations resume. The fleet was put out of service May 3 after a dozen incidents since April 2008 in which pilots' oxygen was cut off. It is the latest issue for the F-22, which cost an estimated $412 million each, according to the U.S. Government Accountability Office's latest report, and have not been used in combat since entering service in 2005.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Concerns about the Air Force's problem-plagued fleet of F-22 Raptor fighter jets led Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta to restrict flights of the aircraft because of problems with its oxygen systems that can cause its pilots to become disoriented mid-flight. In addition, Panetta wants a monthly progress report on the investigation into the root cause of the F-22's oxygen problems and ordered the Air Force to speed up the installation of an automatic backup oxygen system. Panetta also called on Navy and NASA personnel to find a solution.
BUSINESS
June 14, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Oxygen problems that have plagued the Air Force's fleet of F-22 Raptor fighter jets may be worse than previously disclosed, according to new information released by two members of Congress. F-22 pilots have reported dozens of incidents in which the jet's systems weren't feeding them enough oxygen, causing hypoxia-like symptoms in the air. Hypoxia is a condition resulting from a deficiency of oxygen reaching tissues of the body that can cause nausea, headaches, fatigue or even blackouts.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta has approved a plan to begin lifting flight restrictions that he placed on the Air Force's problem-plagued fleet of F-22 Raptor fighter jets. Since 2008, F-22 pilots have reported more than a dozen incidents in which they experienced hypoxia-like symptoms in the air. Hypoxia is a condition that can bring on nausea, headaches, fatigue or blackouts. In May, Panetta ordered that any flights in a F-22 “will remain within the proximity of potential landing locations to enable quick recovery and landing should the pilot encounter unanticipated physiological conditions during flight.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Recent troubles with the Air Force's fleet of F-22 Raptor fighter jets have prompted fresh questions by two members of Congress looking for answers on the oxygen problems that have plagued the aircraft for years. F-22 pilots have reported dozens of incidents in which the jet's systems weren't feeding them a proper amount of oxygen in flight, causing hypoxia-like symptoms. Hypoxia is a condition that can cause nausea, headaches, fatigue or even blackouts. On Tuesday, Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.)
BUSINESS
June 14, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Oxygen problems that have plagued the Air Force's fleet of F-22 Raptor fighter jets may be worse than previously disclosed, according to new information released by two members of Congress. F-22 pilots have reported dozens of incidents in which the jet's systems weren't feeding them enough oxygen, causing hypoxia-like symptoms in the air. Hypoxia is a condition resulting from a deficiency of oxygen reaching tissues of the body that can cause nausea, headaches, fatigue or even blackouts.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Concerns about the Air Force's problem-plagued fleet of F-22 Raptor fighter jets led Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta to restrict flights of the aircraft because of problems with its oxygen systems that can cause its pilots to become disoriented mid-flight. In addition, Panetta wants a monthly progress report on the investigation into the root cause of the F-22's oxygen problems and ordered the Air Force to speed up the installation of an automatic backup oxygen system. Panetta also called on Navy and NASA personnel to find a solution.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
In response to growing concern about problems with its F-22 Raptor fighter jet, the Air Force revealed it has slapped on new safety restrictions to protect its pilots. The announcement came as Sen. Mark R. Warner (D-Va.) and Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.) Friday requested additional information from the secretary of the Air Force to further determine the scope of safety concerns raised by several pilots of the world's most expensive fighter jet, designed and built byLockheed Martin Corp.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Some of the nation's top aviators are refusing to fly the radar-evading F-22 Raptor, a fighter jet with ongoing problems with the oxygen systems that have plagued the fleet for four years. At the risk of significant reprimand - or even discharge from the Air Force - fighter pilots are turning down the opportunity to climb into the cockpit of the F-22, the world's most expensive fighter jet. The Air Force did not reveal how many of its 200 F-22 pilots, who are stationed at seven military bases across the country, declined their assignment orders.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
The Pentagon announced that it awarded a contract worth as much as $7.4 billion to aerospace giant Lockheed Martin Corp. to upgrade the Air Force's problem-plagued fleet of F-22 Raptor fighter jets. The announcement said that the Bethesda, Md., company would "add new capabilities and enhance the performance of the aircraft. " Lockheed referred all questions about the contract to the Air Force, which said it could not provide details about the upgrade announced Friday. The F-22, which costs an estimated $412 million each, is the military's most expensive fighter jet and known to be its most advanced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1999
"Will We Rule the Skies?" (Commentary, Oct. 1) by Gen. Michael Ryan, the chief of staff of the U.S. Air Force, left two little facts out: The number of F-22 Raptors to be built. (Some say 20, others say three times that number.) That each F-22 Raptor will cost the American taxpayer over $200 million. I'm sure this was just a little oversight. GENE POE Los Angeles
BUSINESS
March 20, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
The Air Force will modify the handle that engages the emergency oxygen system in its entire fleet of F-22 Raptor fighter jets after a report found that it played a role in a crash that killed one of its top aviators. The changes come as Anna Haney, the pilot's widow, filed a wrongful-death lawsuit againstLockheed Martin Corp.and subcontractors that designed and built the nation's most expensive fighter jet. Capt. Jeff Haney, 31, died when his F-22 crashed in the Alaskan wilderness in November 2010.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2011 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Capt. Jeff Haney was headed back to base in his F-22 Raptor fighter jet, ripping through the frigid Alaskan night beyond the speed of sound at more than 1,000 mph, when things started going terribly wrong. Packed tight in cold-weather gear to protect him from the bitter temperatures, the Air Force pilot pulled back on the control stick at about 38,400 feet to gain altitude. Then Haney saw his plane was beginning to fail him. A caution light glowed green through his night vision goggles, alerting him that a section of the aircraft was overheating.
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