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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1998
The Air Force's sleek new fighter plane, the F-22 Raptor, has broken the sound barrier for the first time, flying over Edwards AFB just four days before the 51st anniversary of the day the sound barrier was first conquered over the same base. "From all indications, the Raptor flew past the sound barrier with ease," said Lt. Col. C.D. Moore, commander of the F-22 Combined Test Force. "This is just one step of many for the program."
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NATIONAL
July 17, 2009 | Julian E. Barnes
Intensifying a fight over the fate of the military's F-22 stealth fighter jets, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said Thursday that the push by lawmakers for additional planes -- against the Pentagon's recommendation -- actually risks making America more vulnerable.
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BUSINESS
August 13, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under the blistering desert sun, in a hangar surrounded by barbed-wire-topped fences and electronic security gates, dozens of mechanics bustle around an F-22 Raptor, the most deadly fighter ever built. The Air Force says the F-22 can do things no fighter has ever done--flying faster and farther than any rival, and all with gymnastic maneuverability. But right now, the aircraft's fight isn't in the skies over Bosnia or in a dogfight with Iraqi MIGs--it is in the corridors of the Pentagon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2009 | Tony Perry
A veteran test pilot was killed Wednesday when an F-22 Raptor, an Air Force fighter plane designed to provide "air dominance" with its missiles and cannons, crashed in the high desert outside Edwards Air Force Base. The pilot was identified as David Cooley, 49, a 21-year Air Force veteran who joined Lockheed Martin Corp., the plane's principal contractor, in 2003. Cooley, of Palmdale, was pronounced dead at Victor Valley Community Hospital in Victorville.
NEWS
October 14, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Wednesday approved a $278-billion defense appropriations bill that will keep alive the imperiled F-22 fighter plane program and provide military personnel with their biggest pay raise in 18 years. By a 372-55 vote, the chamber passed a compromise measure that gives the military $4.5 billion more than President Clinton recommended and $17 billion more than was spent on defense in fiscal 1999. The bill is expected to win Senate approval.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Flight tests of Lockheed Martin Corp.'s F-22 stealth fighter are falling far enough behind schedule that Congress should examine whether to slow approval of production money for the most expensive U.S. weapons program, the General Accounting Office said Tuesday. Technical and manufacturing problems during development are reducing the number of flight test hours for what the Defense Department sees as its top radar-evading, 21st-century fighter.
BUSINESS
December 23, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Air Force Places Order for Lockheed F-22s: The Air Force formally proposed buying 442 of the advanced fighter jets, but the request still needs the approval of top Pentagon officials, said Air Force spokeswoman Marie Bradshaw. The plane is being developed by Calabasas-based Lockheed Corp. and Boeing Co. for the 21st Century. The Pentagon earlier said it might order 648 F-22s for about $60 billion but has scaled back those plans. The planes will be built at Lockheed plants in Marietta, Ga.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lockheed Wins Fighter Job: The Air Force awarded a team led by Lockheed a $9.55-billion contract to begin development of the F-22 jet fighter. Separately, Pratt & Whitney received a contract for $1.37 billion to develop 33 of the F-22 jet engines. The two awards, which will be cost-plus-type contracts, total $11 billion. The F-22 will be the Air Force's next generation fighter, replacing the F-15.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1992 | Dean Takahashi / Times staff writer
Software Contract: PDA Engineering, a maker of engineering software, said Monday that Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co. in Marietta, Ga., has selected PDA's software system to help it develop a new jet fighter. PDA said Lockheed selected its M/Vision software after an extensive review and will use the materials-analysis software to analyze data from thousands of tests on parts materials for the Air Force's planned F-22 fighter.
NEWS
September 30, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind closed doors at the U.S. Capitol, negotiators for the House and Senate neared a decision Wednesday night that may determine the fate of the Air Force's most coveted new weapons program, the profitability of the nation's biggest defense contractor and potential future jobs for tens of thousands of workers. As they attempt to resolve the impasse, key players in the negotiation also are pondering a puzzling question: Why has Rep. Jerry Lewis done this?
BUSINESS
March 10, 2009 | DAN NEIL
The F-22 Raptor is sex on carbon fiber wings. This is America's premier air superiority fighter, and it's a bad, bad monkey. At an F-22 demonstration at the Reno Air Show in September, I nearly passed out from testosterone poisoning. If you're at an advertising firm -- say, Keiler & Co. of Farmington, Conn., the agency of record for Lockheed Martin Corp. -- and the product you're promoting is this sky-shredding death kite, you might expect to knock off early.
NATIONAL
February 16, 2008 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
The top two officials of the Air Force on Friday disowned comments made earlier this week by a four-star general who implied the service was at odds with the Bush administration over purchases of sophisticated new F-22 fighters. Gen. T. Michael Moseley, the Air Force chief of staff, and Michael W. Wynne, the Air Force secretary and top civilian official, said the general's remarks "misrepresent the position of the U.S.
NATIONAL
February 15, 2008 | Peter Spiegel, Times Staff Writer
In an intensifying dispute over weapons priorities, Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates on Thursday privately rebuked a four-star general for suggesting the Air Force intended to buy twice as many sophisticated F-22 Raptor aircraft as the Bush administration had approved, according to Air Force officials. One senior defense official called the remarks by Gen.
NATIONAL
December 23, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
An Air Force general said he expected the F/A-22 Raptor to join combat operations by the end of next year, despite this week's crash of one of the next-generation stealth fighter jets. "We're going to keep right on going," said Maj. Gen. Stephen M. Goldfein, the Air Warfare Center commander at Nellis Air Force Base, where the approximately $133-million plane crashed and burned on a runway shortly after takeoff Monday.
NATIONAL
December 22, 2004 | From Times Wire Services
Flights of a next-generation stealth fighter jet were grounded nationwide Tuesday while investigators at Nellis Air Force Base combed the wreckage of one that crashed during testing, the Air Force said. The pilot of the F/A-22 Raptor ejected shortly before the crash Monday and was taken to a hospital. He was not seriously hurt, said Capt. Maureen Schumann, an Air Force spokeswoman.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2002 | John Hendren, Times Staff Writer
Faced with an unexpected $690-million cost overrun in its troubled F/A-22 fighter program, the Pentagon may slash the number of planes it purchases from Lockheed Martin Corp., a senior official said Wednesday. The development is an embarrassment for the Air Force and for Lockheed Martin, which designed the plane at its Skunk Works facility in Burbank. The program has seen rising costs and recent management shake-ups.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key Pentagon panel has approved starting limited production of the U.S. Air Force's controversial F-22 jet fighter despite acknowledging that costs were exceeding projections and that fewer jets could eventually be built. The Defense Department panel, in an eagerly awaited decision, told the Air Force that it could begin initial production of 10 F-22s for $2.1 billion, but that the planned number of planes would have to be reduced to 295 from 333.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under the blistering desert sun, in a hangar surrounded by barbed-wire-topped fences and electronic security gates, dozens of mechanics bustle around an F-22 Raptor, the most deadly fighter ever built. The Air Force says the F-22 can do things no fighter has ever done--flying faster and farther than any rival, and all with gymnastic maneuverability. But right now, the aircraft's fight isn't in the skies over Bosnia or in a dogfight with Iraqi MIGs--it is in the corridors of the Pentagon.
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