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F 22 Airplane

BUSINESS
December 29, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Lockheed Martin Corp. was awarded $502 million in contracts to build the first two F-22 fighter jets, the Pentagon said. The amount awarded excludes an estimated $191-million down payment on the next six aircraft, which may come as early as this week, officials said. The Air Force plans to purchase 339 of the planes and 777 engines during the next 16 years. At an estimated cost of $187 million each, the F-22 will be the world's most expensive fighter plane when it goes into service in 2004.
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BUSINESS
April 24, 1991 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The aerospace industry in Southern California lost big when the Air Force on Tuesday decided to give the $14-billion development contract for the advanced tactical fighter to a team led by Lockheed Corp. The initial impact will be in the hundreds of jobs that will be eliminated by Los Angeles-based Northrop Corp., the Lockheed team's vanquished competitor.
BUSINESS
April 28, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
A prototype Lockheed F-22 jet fighter caught fire and burned extensively on the main runway at Edwards Air Force Base on Saturday after experiencing problems during a test flight by a Lockheed company pilot, who escaped with minor injuries. The Air Force said the pilot decided to make an emergency landing after the aircraft experienced "uncommanded oscillations"--meaning, apparently, that it began to vibrate--during touch-and-go landing maneuvers.
BUSINESS
August 16, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key Pentagon panel has approved starting limited production of the U.S. Air Force's controversial F-22 jet fighter despite acknowledging that costs were exceeding projections and that fewer jets could eventually be built. The Defense Department panel, in an eagerly awaited decision, told the Air Force that it could begin initial production of 10 F-22s for $2.1 billion, but that the planned number of planes would have to be reduced to 295 from 333.
BUSINESS
April 24, 1991 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The good news for Southern California in Tuesday's announcement that a Lockheed-led team will build the nation's next fighter jet was spread rather thin. Lockheed estimates that the F-22 advanced tactical fighter project will generate 5,000 jobs for subcontractors in Southern California. But many subcontractors expect the new jobs simply to replace positions in expiring programs; the net employment gain will be far smaller, according to company spokesmen.
NEWS
September 8, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Lockheed Martin's F-22 Raptor stealth fighter was taken on its maiden test flight, spending an hour in the air at speeds up to 285 mph. "If you can fly a Cessna 150, you can fly this airplane," said test pilot Paul Metz, referring to the common civilian craft. The Air Force is scheduled to get 339 of the planes to replace the F-15C, currently its top fighter, at a cost of $43 billion.
NATIONAL
December 22, 2004 | From Times Wire Services
Flights of a next-generation stealth fighter jet were grounded nationwide Tuesday while investigators at Nellis Air Force Base combed the wreckage of one that crashed during testing, the Air Force said. The pilot of the F/A-22 Raptor ejected shortly before the crash Monday and was taken to a hospital. He was not seriously hurt, said Capt. Maureen Schumann, an Air Force spokeswoman.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1993 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Air Force is discussing scaling back purchases of Lockheed F-22 jet fighters to 442 aircraft from the planned 648, a Lockheed official said Monday. At about $95 billion, the F-22 procurement program is the Pentagon's biggest and Lockheed's most important project for the next 20 years. The Defense Department is conducting a comprehensive review of major weapons programs and considering a wide range of options, among them canceling one or more of the current aircraft programs.
BUSINESS
April 5, 1997 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Lockheed Martin Corp. prepares for next week's unveiling of the first F-22 jet fighter, an ugly new controversy has erupted over potential future cost overruns that could push up the weapon's price tag by 23%. A Pentagon study estimates the F-22 program will cost $80 billion, up from earlier forecasts of $65 billion for 438 of the supersonic stealth jets.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1997 | MARK GLASER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a move that brought relief to the computer gaming community, Lockheed Martin Corp. said it has reversed ground and will not pursue an exclusive contract with a flight-simulation game company for the F-22 Raptor's name and images. The action stems from a request last month by the Lockheed Skunkworks division for an unprecedented contract with Calabasas-based NovaLogic for the rights to the jet's name and images.
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