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F 22

OPINION
August 19, 2001
Everest Riccioni's representations of the F-22's capabilities are not based on current facts and do not accurately reflect its true state (Commentary, Aug. 14). In testing conducted to date, the F-22 is meeting or exceeds all stealth criteria (visual, radar, electromagnetic emissions, infrared and sound). It provides greatly reduced vulnerability against surface-to-air missile systems and air-to-air missiles by combining stealth and super-cruise, the ability to fly supersonically without afterburners.
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BUSINESS
August 16, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A key Pentagon panel has approved starting limited production of the U.S. Air Force's controversial F-22 jet fighter despite acknowledging that costs were exceeding projections and that fewer jets could eventually be built. The Defense Department panel, in an eagerly awaited decision, told the Air Force that it could begin initial production of 10 F-22s for $2.1 billion, but that the planned number of planes would have to be reduced to 295 from 333.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under the blistering desert sun, in a hangar surrounded by barbed-wire-topped fences and electronic security gates, dozens of mechanics bustle around an F-22 Raptor, the most deadly fighter ever built. The Air Force says the F-22 can do things no fighter has ever done--flying faster and farther than any rival, and all with gymnastic maneuverability. But right now, the aircraft's fight isn't in the skies over Bosnia or in a dogfight with Iraqi MIGs--it is in the corridors of the Pentagon.
NEWS
March 8, 2000 | MATTHEW EBNET, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A presidential campaign enlivened by hot-button local issues such as the proposed El Toro airport drove Orange County voters to the polls Tuesday, with turnout the best in years: 42.4% as of 7 p.m., the Registrar's office reported Tuesday. From the moment polling locations opened at 7 a.m., voters, with newspapers and election guides rolled in their hands, lined up throughout the county to cast ballots. At some stations, lines formed even during traditionally off-peak hours such as 10 and 11 a.
NEWS
October 14, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Wednesday approved a $278-billion defense appropriations bill that will keep alive the imperiled F-22 fighter plane program and provide military personnel with their biggest pay raise in 18 years. By a 372-55 vote, the chamber passed a compromise measure that gives the military $4.5 billion more than President Clinton recommended and $17 billion more than was spent on defense in fiscal 1999. The bill is expected to win Senate approval.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1999 | MICHAEL RYAN, Gen. Michael Ryan is chief of staff of the U.S. Air Force
NATO and the United States completed a victorious air campaign in Yugoslavia. As in Desert Storm, almost a decade earlier, the conditions for victory were set because we owned the sky: We had air superiority. Air superiority is not just control of an enemy's aircraft; it is domination of all an enemy's air capabilities--command and control, communications, radar, surface-to-air missiles, airfields, munitions and infrastructure.
NEWS
September 30, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind closed doors at the U.S. Capitol, negotiators for the House and Senate neared a decision Wednesday night that may determine the fate of the Air Force's most coveted new weapons program, the profitability of the nation's biggest defense contractor and potential future jobs for tens of thousands of workers. As they attempt to resolve the impasse, key players in the negotiation also are pondering a puzzling question: Why has Rep. Jerry Lewis done this?
NEWS
July 23, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House voted Thursday to deny production funding for the Air Force's F-22, the most expensive fighter ever sought by the armed services, in a move that raises broader questions about Congress' willingness to finance other high-priced weapons on the Pentagon drawing board. Despite pressure from the White House and the F-22's congressional advocates, the chamber voted, 379 to 45, for a $266-billion annual defense appropriation that would remove $1.
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