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F Grades

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OPINION
April 6, 1986
As a second grade teacher, I am appalled at the letters expressing opposition to the Board of Education's elimination of "F" grades for kindergarten through second grade students. One of the main purposes of primary education is to instill in children a feeling of confidence and self-worth. Some children have the disadvantages of poverty, illiterate parents, lack of enriching experiences, uprootedness, cultural alienation, or even hunger. Giving these children a grade of "F" on their report cards only insults them and gives them another hurdle to overcome.
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NEWS
May 31, 2012 | By Maeve Reston
It may be early in the general election contest for the White House, but Mitt Romney has not been pulling punches in his assessment of President Obama in recent weeks - and he was blunt when asked Thursday to grade Obama's first term. “Oh, an 'F,' no question about that,” Romney told CBS News political correspondent Jan Crawford. “Across the board.” Crawford pressed the former Massachusetts governor about whether he would hold to that rating of Obama even after the targeted killing of Osama bin Laden.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1991
On the nights when sleeping or partying or hanging out is more inviting to a teen-ager than studying, the threat of an F can be a powerful motivational tool--especially for students barely holding on to a low C or D grade in a course. It may not be as positive an incentive as a thirst for knowledge. But parental and peer pressure has kept many a young person at the books. San Diego city schools see it differently.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2010 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
Paradise Cove may finally be living up to its name, at least when it comes to the water. Over the years the Malibu beach had become known as much for its poor water quality as for being featured in the 1970s television series "The Rockford Files." This year, however, the gains made in the health of Paradise Cove mark one of the pieces of good news in the Beach Report Card released Wednesday by the Santa Monica nonprofit group Heal the Bay, which analyzes monitoring data at 326 beaches in California and assigns them A through F grades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2010 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
Paradise Cove may finally be living up to its name, at least when it comes to the water. Over the years the Malibu beach had become known as much for its poor water quality as for being featured in the 1970s television series "The Rockford Files." This year, however, the gains made in the health of Paradise Cove mark one of the pieces of good news in the Beach Report Card released Wednesday by the Santa Monica nonprofit group Heal the Bay, which analyzes monitoring data at 326 beaches in California and assigns them A through F grades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1991
The public furor aroused by the recent elimination of F grades by the San Diego city schools is further evidence of the need for two fundamental changes in education. These vital reforms are: (1) parental choice as to the schools children attend and (2) self-governing, autonomous schools, free of interference from educational bureaucrats. For years, professional educators have argued fervidly over the merits and disadvantages of eliminating failing grades. Parents cannot look to the experts for any consensus on this issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2005 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
Officials of Orange County's largest school district were dealing with the fallout Tuesday from a high school principal's memo that urged teachers to pass failing students so they could graduate and allow the school to meet federal graduation requirements. A June 9 memo from the principal of Santa Ana's Saddleback High School asked teachers to reconsider the failing grades of 98 students so that the school could meet the standards of the federal No Child Left Behind Act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2002 | MARIA-BELEN MORAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bertha Medina was determined to make her fan work. First she checked the motor. Then she spotted the problem. After a quick snip of a flower pasted too close to the blades, she smiled as fresh air blew on her face. Her science project was up and running. The 9-year-old is one of many students who gather after school in San Francisco's largely Latino Mission District to experiment with physics, chemistry, biology and engineering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1996
The critics' view of the charter school movement is interesting. It goes something like this: Take the most recent set of standardized test scores; point out the predictable fact that some students haven't improved, or have even declined, and suggest that the whole effort might be a waste of time. Of course, that is ridiculous. The approximately 100 schools around the state that have been freed from most state and local regulations have launched a variety of programs.
NEWS
January 30, 1995 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Worker A sells more car parts per month than Worker B, so Worker A gets a nice raise. Teacher A produces more students with high test scores than Teacher B, so Teacher A gets the bump in pay. Sounds reasonable, right? Wrong, educators say. For decades, public education has been wedded to a uniform pay scale that neither rewards superior teachers nor penalizes poor ones. Business leaders, parents and politicians--most recently Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1994 | SUSAN BYRNES
Four San Fernando Valley high schools may have found an antidote to the disease of truancy that has plagued schools since their existence: an F. According to preliminary figures, attendance rates have improved markedly at four schools where policies allowing teachers to fail students who miss a fixed number of days in class were implemented last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1991
On the nights when sleeping or partying or hanging out is more inviting to a teen-ager than studying, the threat of an F can be a powerful motivational tool--especially for students barely holding on to a low C or D grade in a course. It may not be as positive an incentive as a thirst for knowledge. But parental and peer pressure has kept many a young person at the books. San Diego city schools see it differently.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1991
The public furor aroused by the recent elimination of F grades by the San Diego city schools is further evidence of the need for two fundamental changes in education. These vital reforms are: (1) parental choice as to the schools children attend and (2) self-governing, autonomous schools, free of interference from educational bureaucrats. For years, professional educators have argued fervidly over the merits and disadvantages of eliminating failing grades. Parents cannot look to the experts for any consensus on this issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1991 | DAVID SMOLLAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A special community task force on dropout prevention held to its guns Tuesday and defended its recommendation to eliminate F grades in San Diego city secondary schools, despite a rising chorus of concern and opposition among teachers and principals.
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