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NEWS
September 13, 2011 | By Alexa Vaughn, Washington Bureau
The House of Representatives on Tuesday quickly and unanimously passed a bill temporarily extending funding for the Federal Aviation Administration and federal highway programs.   Funding for more than a million federal employees and construction jobs was set to expire by Oct. 1 if extensions were not passed, and though both parties had their misgivings about the bill, no House members wanted to be tied to such a job loss. The FAA's funding through Jan. 31 comes from the 22nd consecutive extension bill since the last long-term funding bill for it expired in 2007.
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BUSINESS
March 19, 2014 | By Dominic Gates
SEATTLE - A review of crucial systems on Boeing's 787 Dreamliner ordered immediately after two serious 787 battery failures in January 2013 has concluded that the jetliner is safe, meets design standards and is about as reliable as other Boeing aircraft were after being introduced, according to a final report published Wednesday. The review, conducted by Federal Aviation Administration and Boeing Co. technical experts, also validates the oversight role played by the regulatory agency, concluding that "the FAA had effective processes in place to identify and correct issues.
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NEWS
December 6, 2011 | By James Oliphant
The head of the Federal Aviation Administration, Randy Babbitt, has resigned after his arrest for allegedly driving while intoxicated in Virginia. Babbitt, 65, had been placed on administrative leave Monday. He offered his resignation Tuesday to Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, who accepted. “As FAA Administrator, Randy Babbitt has been a dedicated public servant and outstanding leader.  I'm proud to say that we have the safest aviation system in the world, and thanks to Randy's stewardship, it became safer and stronger," LaHood said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
A congressman who has called for government regulations to reduce helicopter noise in Los Angeles County criticized the Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday for its effort to develop voluntary guidelines for local chopper flights. Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Burbank) said he was concerned the FAA has not come up with a timeline for action as requested by lawmakers and has targeted only three areas of the county to study: Torrance, Hollywood and the Cahuenga Pass. Without a full evaluation of helicopter operations in the entire county, Schiff said the FAA will not understand the extent of the problems facing homeowners and businesses.
NEWS
August 3, 2011 | By Christine Mai-Duc
For the second straight day, President Obama pressured Congress to come back to Washington and resolve an ongoing stalemate that has put thousands of Federal Aviation Administration employees on an abrupt, unpaid leave and left the agency unable to collect ticket fees to the tune of $200 million a week. Congress adjourned this week after passage of the debt-ceiling bill, and is not expected to return until September. By that time, the loss of revenue from ticket fees could amount to $1 billion.
BUSINESS
February 28, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The sky might in fact be the limit for the Harlem Shake. The Federal Aviation Administration on Thursday said it is investigating a video, titled "Harlem Shake Frontier Flight 157," that shows Colorado College's ultimate Frisbee team doing the meme with their fellow passengers. The Harlem Shake is a viral video craze that has exploded in the last month. Most videos show one person dancing alone, with others suddenly joining about 15 seconds into the song. Most videos contain people in costumes and masks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
A congressman who has called for government regulations to reduce helicopter noise in Los Angeles County criticized the Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday for its effort to develop voluntary guidelines for local chopper flights. Rep. Adam B. Schiff (D-Burbank) said he was concerned the FAA has not come up with a timeline for action as requested by lawmakers and has targeted only three areas of the county to study: Torrance, Hollywood and the Cahuenga Pass. Without a full evaluation of helicopter operations in the entire county, Schiff said the FAA will not understand the extent of the problems facing homeowners and businesses.
NATIONAL
September 13, 2011 | By Alexa Vaughn, Washington Bureau
The House of Representatives on Tuesday quickly and unanimously passed a bill temporarily extending funding for the Federal Aviation Administration and federal highway programs. Funding for more than 1 million federal employees and construction jobs was set to expire by Oct. 1 if extensions were not passed. Though both parties had misgivings about the bill, no House members wanted to be tied to a big job loss. The FAA's funding through Jan. 31 comes from the 22nd consecutive extension bill since the last long-term funding bill expired in 2007.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
LAS VEGAS -- In a testament to the rise of the drone industry, the acting head of the Federal Aviation Administration addressed the nation's largest robotics conference to discuss the integration of unmanned aircraft in U.S. skies. Michael Huerta addressed an audience of hundreds in the vast ballroom of the Mandalay Bay hotel at the Assn. for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International trade show. It marked the first time an FAA administrator addressed the show in its 39-year history.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
The Federal Aviation Administration ordered inspections Monday of Boeing 767 jets to check for problems that could result in a "possible loss of control of the airplane," according to a notice published in the Federal Register.  Monday's order is the latest in a string of inspections dating back to 2000. The FAA is calling for inspections of the horizontal flight-control surfaces, called elevators, that help the jets climb and descend. The agency said faulty parts could result "in a significant pitch upset" and cause pilots to lose control of the aircraft.
BUSINESS
January 31, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
The Federal Aviation Administration has downgraded the safety rating of India's commercial airlines, saying the country's commercial carriers fell short of international standards. The FAA's announcement Friday means that India-based airlines can continue to operate in and out of the U.S. but cannot establish new service to this country. The downgrade signifies that India does not comply with the international safety standards set by the International Civil Aviation Organization, an agency of the United Nations.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
The Federal Aviation Administration ordered inspections Monday of Boeing 767 jets to check for problems that could result in a "possible loss of control of the airplane," according to a notice published in the Federal Register.  Monday's order is the latest in a string of inspections dating back to 2000. The FAA is calling for inspections of the horizontal flight-control surfaces, called elevators, that help the jets climb and descend. The agency said faulty parts could result "in a significant pitch upset" and cause pilots to lose control of the aircraft.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 2014 | By Dan Weikel and Richard Simon
For years, residents across Los Angeles County have complained about noise from low-flying helicopters, some of them carrying sightseers, paparazzi and even real estate agents. But new legislation, tucked into the massive federal spending bill approved by Congress last week, could offer relief. The legislation requires the Federal Aviation Administration, within a year, to begin writing flight regulations to reduce the noise unless it can show that voluntary efforts are working. The anti-noise measure, which applies only to the Los Angeles area, was included in a $1-trillion bill that funds federal agencies and programs through Sept.
NATIONAL
December 20, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- With the proposed Los Angeles Residential Helicopter Noise Relief Act unable to get off the ground in Congress, a group of lawmakers is turning to Plan B to try to nudge the Federal Aviation Administration to act more aggressively to reduce helicopter noise. Five Los Angeles-area lawmakers are seeking to attach language to a spending bill that would direct the FAA, within a year after the measure's passage, to begin writing rules to reduce helicopter noise unless it can show that voluntary noise-reduction efforts are working.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
The Federal Aviation Administration is proposing a $325,000 fine against Southwest Airlines, claiming it improperly modified equipment on a small jet that has since flown more than 1,000 flights. The fine involved an anti-icing warning system on the windshield of a AirTran Airways Boeing 717 that was allegedly modified incorrectly in August 2011, according to the FAA. Southwest Airlines purchased AirTran Airways in 2012 and is in the process of merging the two carriers. Since then, the 717 plane has flown 1,140 flights, according with the FAA. The Boeing 717 is a twin-engine, single-aisle jet airliner with up to 138 seats, depending on the configuration.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan
The Federal Aviation Administration plans to issue a warning to airlines flying certain Boeing Co. 787 Dreamliners and 747-8 jumbo jets, advising that they avoid high-altitude thunderstorms after instances of icing. The anticipated move comes after Boeing notified airlines last week that the planes, outfitted with the GEnx engine made by General Electric Co., could have icing problems if they flew close to the storms. The warning is an “interim action to make sure pilots avoid icing conditions that could affect engine power and possibly damage the engine,” the FAA said.
NEWS
March 8, 2012 | By Brian Bennett
The Federal Aviation Administration has taken the first concrete step toward allowing drones to fly alongside passenger airplanes in the United States. As required by a law signed by President Obama in February, the FAA is moving forward with a plan to integrate unmanned aircraft into the national airspace by 2015. In a notice to be published Friday, the FAA is seeking advice on how to select six places across the country that will be used for testing how to safely fly drones in the same area as traditional planes.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2012 | Bloomberg News
U.S. regulators warned manufacturers of so-called light-sport aircraft that many of them are violating safety standards and could be shut down. Most makers aren't following rules that were streamlined to help a struggling industry, the Federal Aviation Administration said in a Federal Register filing Thursday. Manufacturers audited by the agency couldn't prove that planes were properly built and inspected, and weren't able to notify plane owners of safety directives, the FAA said.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
The Federal Aviation Administration will investigate what passengers on a Southwest Airlines flight this week described as a scary dive before the flight leveled off and made a normal landing at Raleigh-Durham International Airport in North Carolina. Flight 3426 was coming from Tampa, Fla., late Tuesday when passenger Shelley Wills said the public address system came on and the pilot said, “'We're going down.' And everyone is looking around like, 'Is this a joke? Is he serious?' And then you felt the nosedive,” Wills told WTVD-TV in Raleigh.
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