Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFaa
IN THE NEWS

Faa

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2013 | By Dan Weikel
A new federal report recommends taking a voluntary approach rather than government regulation to reduce the noise and safety risks of low-flying helicopters over neighborhoods across the Los Angeles Basin. The study by the Federal Aviation Administration stems from requests by members of California's Congressional delegation to address concerns about chopper flights over homes, businesses and landmarks, such as the Hollywood Bowl during performances. The report immediately drew fire from Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank)
Advertisement
BUSINESS
May 11, 2013 | Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
The 149 air traffic control towers that were scheduled to close this summer because of federal sequestration will remain open until at least September, government officials said Friday. The Federal Aviation Administration said legislation approved by Congress last month allows the agency to transfer funds from other accounts to keep the towers open until the end of the fiscal year. The towers, run by contract workers, operate at small airports such as Brown Field Municipal Airport in San Diego, Riverside Municipal Airport, Whiteman Airport in Pacoima, Oxnard Airport, Southern California Logistics Airport in Victorville and Fullerton Municipal Airport.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
The 149 air traffic control towers that were slated to close this summer because of the federal sequestration will remain open until at least September, federal officials said Friday. The Federal Aviation Administration said legislation approved by Congress last month lets it transfer funds from other accounts to keep the towers open until the end of the fiscal year. The towers, run by contract workers, operate at small airports such as Oxnard Airport, Riverside Municipal Airport, Fullerton Municipal Airport, Whiteman Airport in Pacoima, Southern California Logistics Airport in Victorville and Brown Field Municipal Airport in San Diego.  Quiz: What can't you take onboard a jetliner?
BUSINESS
May 9, 2013 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Budget cuts won't force the closure of air traffic control towers during overnight shifts, the Federal Aviation Administration said Wednesday. But the federal agency said it is still uncertain whether it will be forced this summer to close towers operated by contractors at 149 small and medium-size airports, including several in Southern California. Budget cuts called for by the federal sequestration forced the FAA in April to furlough air traffic controllers for one day every two weeks.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Budget cuts won't force the closure of air traffic control towers during overnight shifts, the Federal Aviation Administration said Wednesday. But the federal agency said it is still uncertain whether it will be forced this summer to close towers operated by contractors at 149 small and medium-size airports, including several in Southern California. Budget cuts called for by the federal sequestration forced the FAA in April to furlough air traffic controllers for one day every two weeks.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
A week after federal officials launched job furloughs at air traffic control towers, the controllers are back on a regular work schedule -- and airline delays are now caused primarily by severe weather. The number of delays over the week averaged about 5,800 per day, according to a report from Flightstats.com, a website that monitors flight delays. The greatest number of delays came last Monday, April 22, when slightly more than 7,000 flights were delayed, according to Flightstats.
NEWS
April 26, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
So that's how you get this Congress to spend money: You cramp their vacation plans. The House on Friday passed legislation that will end the furloughing of air traffic controllers. And what got these famously contentious representatives off their duffs? Here's a hint from my colleague Lisa Mascaro's story : Final passage of the quickly arranged stopgap measure came as lawmakers were boarding their own flights out of Washington for a weeklong recess. Yes indeed: Step right this way to board, congressman, for another on-time flight to get you home.
NATIONAL
April 26, 2013 | By Lisa Mascaro and Kathleen Hennessey, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Congress approved a quick fix Friday to end the flight delays snarling the nation's airports, and President Obama will sign the bill when it reaches the White House, showing how swiftly compromise can be found when powerful interests demand it. The speedy resolution came after airlines and businesses warned of lost earnings, and travelers - including lawmakers leaving the capital for a weeklong recess - complained about the waits....
NEWS
April 25, 2013 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
Remember being stuck on the tarmac for eons before the Department of Transportation instituted a time limit? Those days may be back. Blame it on budget cuts. Airlines for America and the Regional Airline Assn. last week asked the Department of Transportation to set aside its tarmac delay rules for 90 days or until the Federal Aviation Administration furloughs mandated by federal budget cuts come to an end. “Granting this exemption serves the best interests of the flying public by providing airlines with the operating flexibility necessary to focus on responding to the FAA's projected delays in ways that minimize and avoid worsening the disruption and inconvenience to our passengers,” Katie Connell, a spokeswoman for Airlines for America, said in an email.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2013 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
On-time performance of airlines at the nation's biggest airports dropped 9 percentage points Monday after hundreds of air traffic controllers were furloughed by budget cuts. East Coast airports felt most of the pain, the Federal Aviation Administration said. Staff shortages at air traffic towers were expected to cause more delays Tuesday in Los Angeles, Dallas and Las Vegas. "Travelers can expect to see a wide range of delays that will change throughout the day depending on staffing and weather-related issues," the agency said in a statement.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|