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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
A jet taxiing on the runway at Chino Airport struck a hangar Thursday evening, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said. There were no immediate reports of  injuries after the Challenger jet struck the hangar, said Ian Gregor, an FAA spokesman in Los Angeles. The fixed-wing multi-engine aircraft is registered to Grady International Inc. in Irvine, according to online FAA records.  No other details were immediately available. ALSO: Ex-Simi Valley teacher denies sexual relationship with child Bryan Stow returns home two years after Dodger Stadium beating Rifle used in Santa Monica College shooting may have been altered   Twitter: @LAJourno robert.lopez@latimes.com
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
A jet smashed into a hanger at Chino Airport on Thursday evening while mechanics were conducting an engine run-up test, a Federal Aviation Administration spokesman said. There were no immediate reports of injuries. The Challenger aircraft was  chocked up on a ramp area and jumped the chocks, Ian Gregor, an FAA spokesman in Los Angeles told The Times. There were three mechanics on the plane, he said. The plane was not intended for flight, said Gregor, citing preliminary information gathered by the agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2013 | By Dan Weikel
Asserting that voluntary guidelines won't work, elected officials on Monday night urged the Federal Aviation Administration to adopt regulations to reduce the noise and safety risks of helicopter flights over neighborhoods across Los Angeles County. At a public hearing in Griffith Park, the officials targeted a recent FAA report, which concluded that controlling helicopter operations would be better with a voluntary approach instead of hard and fast rules that carry penalties. The report , released May 31, is part of an effort to deal with choppers that fly low over neighborhoods, celebrities' homes and famous landmarks, such as the Hollywood sign or the Queen Mary in Long Beach.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
When flight attendants order travelers to shut off their electronic devices during takeoffs and landings, they disrupt a lot of valuable technological activity. Well, maybe the activity is not so valuable but there is a lot of it. More than 105 million hours of activity on electronic devices are expected to be disrupted in 2013 by the Federal Aviation Administration's ban on using such devices during takeoffs and landings, according to a study by DePaul University's Chaddick Institute for Metropolitan Development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2013 | By Dan Weikel
A new federal report recommends taking a voluntary approach rather than government regulation to reduce the noise and safety risks of low-flying helicopters over neighborhoods across the Los Angeles Basin. The study by the Federal Aviation Administration stems from requests by members of California's Congressional delegation to address concerns about chopper flights over homes, businesses and landmarks, such as the Hollywood Bowl during performances. The report immediately drew fire from Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2013 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
A new federal report recommends taking a voluntary approach rather than government regulation to reduce the noise and safety risks of low-flying helicopters over neighborhoods across the Los Angeles Basin. The study by the Federal Aviation Administration stems from requests by members of California's congressional delegation to address concerns about chopper flights over homes, businesses and landmarks, such as the Hollywood Bowl during performances. The report immediately drew fire from Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Burbank)
BUSINESS
May 11, 2013 | Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
The 149 air traffic control towers that were scheduled to close this summer because of federal sequestration will remain open until at least September, government officials said Friday. The Federal Aviation Administration said legislation approved by Congress last month allows the agency to transfer funds from other accounts to keep the towers open until the end of the fiscal year. The towers, run by contract workers, operate at small airports such as Brown Field Municipal Airport in San Diego, Riverside Municipal Airport, Whiteman Airport in Pacoima, Oxnard Airport, Southern California Logistics Airport in Victorville and Fullerton Municipal Airport.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
The 149 air traffic control towers that were slated to close this summer because of the federal sequestration will remain open until at least September, federal officials said Friday. The Federal Aviation Administration said legislation approved by Congress last month lets it transfer funds from other accounts to keep the towers open until the end of the fiscal year. The towers, run by contract workers, operate at small airports such as Oxnard Airport, Riverside Municipal Airport, Fullerton Municipal Airport, Whiteman Airport in Pacoima, Southern California Logistics Airport in Victorville and Brown Field Municipal Airport in San Diego.  Quiz: What can't you take onboard a jetliner?
BUSINESS
May 9, 2013 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Budget cuts won't force the closure of air traffic control towers during overnight shifts, the Federal Aviation Administration said Wednesday. But the federal agency said it is still uncertain whether it will be forced this summer to close towers operated by contractors at 149 small and medium-size airports, including several in Southern California. Budget cuts called for by the federal sequestration forced the FAA in April to furlough air traffic controllers for one day every two weeks.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
Budget cuts won't force the closure of air traffic control towers during overnight shifts, the Federal Aviation Administration said Wednesday. But the federal agency said it is still uncertain whether it will be forced this summer to close towers operated by contractors at 149 small and medium-size airports, including several in Southern California. Budget cuts called for by the federal sequestration forced the FAA in April to furlough air traffic controllers for one day every two weeks.
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