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Fab Morvan

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1991
Voice theft. Song theft. Voice fraud. The cops should have had a voice squad instead of a vice squad in 1990. Silly Story Of The Year award goes to the pop group Milli Vanilli, focus of an international scandal after it was revealed that "singers" Rob Pilatus and Fab Morvan had not sung a note on their 7-million-selling debut album "Girl You Know It's True."
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NEWS
November 19, 1990 | From Associated Press
The music industry's Grammy Award for best new artist was stripped today from Milli Vanilli, the pop duo that admitted last week it did not sing a note on the "Girl You Know It's True" album. "This action comes as a result of admissions and revelations by Milli Vanilli's producer, record label and the two performers Rob Pilatus and Fab Morvan that the label credit on their album . . . was incorrect," the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1990 | STEVE HOCHMAN
There will be no 1989 Grammy for best new artist. The National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences' board of trustees has voted to leave the Grammy--which was stripped from Milli Vanilli frontmen Rob Pilatus and Fab Morvan--unawarded rather than give it to the act that received the second-highest vote total.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1990 | JOHN ANTCZAK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Milli Vanilli duo said today they made a "pact with the devil" when they pretended they sang on a hit album, and they contended it was all with the knowledge of their record company. "We were scared. People threatened us," said Milli Vanilli member Rob Pilatus at a Hollywood news conference today. "We're happy that it's over." Pilatus declined to say who threatened him and partner Fabrice Morvan.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1990 | LARRY McSHANE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The rumors are true: Milli Vanilli--those dreadlocked, hunky dudes Rob and Fab--never actually sang on their debut album that sold 7 million copies, the producer-arranger conceded. "The record company never knew that. I never told them anything," said Frank Farian, the German producer who turned a pair of anonymous pretty boys into an international phenomenon. "Later on, after the record was out, there were some people who raised some questions."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1990 | TONY PERRY
R. Peter Mitchell of La Jolla heard Tina Turner hawking Chryslers on television by saying something about "who said you don't get no respect?" He gave Chrysler Corp. a SLAP. He read about the Disney movie "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids." SLAP. He heard McDonald's doing a commercial tie-in with "Honey . . . " SLAP. (And one to San Diego's Joan Kroc, too). He heard a San Diego car dealer say "it don't make no difference."
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | MAUREEN SAJBEL, Sajbel, a free-lance writer, regularly contributes to The Times fashion pages
Do clothes make the band? In the case of Milli Vanilli, they certainly haven't hurt. The pop group, composed of German-born Rob Pilatus, 24, and French-born Fab Morvan, 23, is known for its highly danceable music (with four No. 1 hits in the last year, starting with "Girl You Know It's True") and their own nonstop aerobic workout on stage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1990 | LOIS TIMNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing insufficient evidence, prosecutors refused to file sexual battery charges Wednesday against Rob Pilatus of the lip-syncing, scandal-ridden pop duo Milli Vanilli. "It's not that I question her credibility," Deputy Dist. Atty. Lynn Reed said after interviewing the 25-year-old woman involved. "But the conduct described did not rise to the level of a sexual assault or battery that we could successfully prosecute."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1992 | CARLA RIVERA
First Milli Vanilli and now New Kids On the Block. The stunning lip-syncing revelations about Vanilli and accusations of same about the Kids bring to mind one of my first reporting assignments at another newspaper. I was assigned to cover a musical competition among the student body at a college. What my editors wanted was an irreverent story intended to provide our readers frothy entertainment over their Sunday morning mugs.
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