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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel
On a sunny September day, Christina Ayres lay on the sand near the Huntington Beach Pier, tanning in a pink bikini, and ticked off the things that identify a 909er. Bad clothing - " 'Jersey Shore' style," the 29-year-old explained. And meth addicts. "That's what you hear on the news. " Over on Main Street, Ryan Kaupang, 21, had a more specific description: "White kids that dress like bros," he said, "bros" meaning people who wear cut-off jerseys and motocross gear and "try to act like tough guys.
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NATIONAL
July 20, 2012 | By Robin Abcarian
The family of 23-year-old Micayla Medek went through an almost unimaginable emotional torture Friday. They knew she'd been wounded in the Aurora, Colo., movie theater shooting shortly after midnight Thursday; her friends who'd accompanied her to “The Dark Knight Rises” told them as much. But it took nearly 20 hours after the gunman killed 12 people and wounded 58 others to get the awful news. Late Friday, they learned that Cayla, as they called her, was one of 10 people who died in the movie theater.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
A start-up company said it's leaving Facebook because 80% of its ad clicks are coming from bots. Musician site Limited Run said Facebook also won't let it change its Pages name unless it commits to buy $2,000 in advertsing on the social network per month. Limited Run said it plans to delete its Facebook page because only 20% of the ad clicks it gets come from Facebook users. The rest come from bots, or web robots, which are software programs that run automated tasks quickly. The company, which goes by its Limited Pressing on Facebook, said it used six analytic services and its own analysis to find out discovered that bots make most of the ad clicks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2011 | By Richard Winton and Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
A music executive critically wounded by a gunman who opened fire Friday in Hollywood died Monday, Los Angeles police said. John C. Atterberry, 40, of Hollywood Hills was driving near the intersection of Sunset Boulevard and Vine Street when he was shot three times in the face and neck by the gunman, later identified by authorities as Tyler Brehm, 26, of Los Angeles. Brehm repeatedly fired a .40-caliber handgun at motorists, police said. Atterberry's silver Mercedes-Benz coupe was one of several cars Brehm shot at from close range.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Jeff Spurrier
Jamie Jamison remembers her early introduction to woad. She was on a road trip with her parents, stopping at a Stuckey's shop and seeing a tiny souvenir Navajo rug that illustrated where the natural dyes came from. She has her own now -- blues, greens and yellows, all grown from her yard. Yellow is easy. Even onion skins will make a usable yellow. Blue, however, is another story. For that she is growing woad, Isatis tinctoria , a member of the mustard family. Woad originated in southern Europe and western Asia.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Jeff Spurrier
Furniture maker Cliff Spencer's workshop in Marina del Rey is a long way from where Paul Vander Werf lives near Trona, northeast of Ridgecrest, Calif. In Trona, the area averages fewer than 4 inches of rain a year. The topsoil is high desert hard pan that bakes in summer and freezes in winter. When filmmakers want a location to convey a world without water, they go to Trona. Vander Werf moved to the high desert after 10 years in rainy Hawaii, so he wanted solutions to the difficult growing climate.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | By Paul Goff
We discovered the Ruin about 12 years ago when it was a small, abandoned stone house. We were hiking in Pioneertown's Pipes Canyon, and there it was, all by itself in a cove-like setting of boulders and desert plants and barely the remains of a road to get to it. We hiked back about a year after and the roof had been knocked in, or it had caved in after years of weather and neglect. A few months later, on another visit, we saw the western wall where the front door and window once stood were gone.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Can a person's Facebook profile reveal what kind of employee he or she might be? The answer is yes, and with unnerving accuracy, according to a new paper published in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology. And if you are smugly thinking to yourself, "I've carefully wiped my Facebook page of any incriminating photos, comments and wall posts," - well, it turns out you may still not have hidden your true nature from future employers: On a rating scale that examines key personality attributes that indicate future job success, you might get rated high in conscientiousness and possibly low on extroversion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2013 | By Kate Mather
Hannah Anderson, the 16-year-old San Diego County girl whose kidnapping sparked a six-day, multistate manhunt, has faced off with her critics on social media, telling them to "mind their own business" and "get a life. " In recent days, Hannah has posted messages on the "Prayers for Hannah Anderson" Facebook page, initially thanking supporters and saying the page "helped find me. " She has since turned her attention to those who have criticized her behavior, including her social media activity in the days after her rescue.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
In a court decision that could exist only in our modern age, a man in Ohio was given the choice of posting a court-approved apology to his estranged wife on his Facebook page every day for 30 days, or facing up to 60 days of jail time. Mark Byron, a photographer in Cincinnati, chose the forced Facebook apology, until suddenly he didn't. On day 26 he abruptly stopped posting the lengthy apology written by the court magistrate, saying it violated his right to free speech. Byron told the Associated Press he was willing to go to jail to protect his rights, but it turns out that it won't be necessary.  Judge Jon Seive of Hamilton County Domestic Court said Monday that the man had posted the Facebook apology long enough, the AP reported.
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