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September 21, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel
On a sunny September day, Christina Ayres lay on the sand near the Huntington Beach Pier, tanning in a pink bikini, and ticked off the things that identify a 909er. Bad clothing - " 'Jersey Shore' style," the 29-year-old explained. And meth addicts. "That's what you hear on the news. " Over on Main Street, Ryan Kaupang, 21, had a more specific description: "White kids that dress like bros," he said, "bros" meaning people who wear cut-off jerseys and motocross gear and "try to act like tough guys.
February 22, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Can a person's Facebook profile reveal what kind of employee he or she might be? The answer is yes, and with unnerving accuracy, according to a new paper published in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology. And if you are smugly thinking to yourself, "I've carefully wiped my Facebook page of any incriminating photos, comments and wall posts," - well, it turns out you may still not have hidden your true nature from future employers: On a rating scale that examines key personality attributes that indicate future job success, you might get rated high in conscientiousness and possibly low on extroversion.
July 12, 2013 | By Paul Goff
We discovered the Ruin about 12 years ago when it was a small, abandoned stone house. We were hiking in Pioneertown's Pipes Canyon, and there it was, all by itself in a cove-like setting of boulders and desert plants and barely the remains of a road to get to it. We hiked back about a year after and the roof had been knocked in, or it had caved in after years of weather and neglect. A few months later, on another visit, we saw the western wall where the front door and window once stood were gone.
April 11, 2013 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Joe Green, Mark Zuckerberg's Harvard roommate, is famous for having turned down an offer to move to Silicon Valley to join Facebook. Instead Green finished his college degree and worked for 2004 Democratic presidential nominee John Kerry, missing out on a once-in-a-lifetime payday. Now he's reuniting with his college pal on a project that straddles two worlds for which he has great affinity: technology and politics. Green, 29, is the founder and president of, a new political advocacy group funded by Zuckerberg and other prominent Silicon Valley executives to press for immigration reform and other technology industry causes.
July 9, 2013 | By Jeff Spurrier
Jamie Jamison remembers her early introduction to woad. She was on a road trip with her parents, stopping at a Stuckey's shop and seeing a tiny souvenir Navajo rug that illustrated where the natural dyes came from. She has her own now -- blues, greens and yellows, all grown from her yard. Yellow is easy. Even onion skins will make a usable yellow. Blue, however, is another story. For that she is growing woad, Isatis tinctoria , a member of the mustard family. Woad originated in southern Europe and western Asia.
July 8, 2013 | By Randall Roberts
This post has been updated. See below for details. A young Brazilian rapper who went by the name of MC Daleste was shot and killed while performing on Saturday night in the township of Campinas, outside of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The 20-year-old, whose birth name was Daniel Pellegrine,  was rapping to a crowd at a public housing complex when he was attacked, according to Billboard, which cited local news sources. After the incident, he was rushed to an area hospital, where he died, the publication said.
April 10, 2012 | By David Horsey
Facebook, the funky little social media operation that began as a way for horny Harvard guys to meet girls, has turned into an Internet juggernaut. On its way to an initial public stock offering that will probably bring in $100 billion, Facebook has decided to spend one of those millions on a tiny company with a staff of just 13 people. That tiny company is called Instagram, purveyor of a photo sharing and enhancement application for smartphones. Instagram's app has become so popular that it has morphed into an alternative avenue for communicating with family and friends.
March 20, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
In a court decision that could exist only in our modern age, a man in Ohio was given the choice of posting a court-approved apology to his estranged wife on his Facebook page every day for 30 days, or facing up to 60 days of jail time. Mark Byron, a photographer in Cincinnati, chose the forced Facebook apology, until suddenly he didn't. On day 26 he abruptly stopped posting the lengthy apology written by the court magistrate, saying it violated his right to free speech. Byron told the Associated Press he was willing to go to jail to protect his rights, but it turns out that it won't be necessary.  Judge Jon Seive of Hamilton County Domestic Court said Monday that the man had posted the Facebook apology long enough, the AP reported.
November 12, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
You've got questions? We've got answers! Well, to cooking questions anyway. LIVE VIDEO DISCUSSION: Join us Wednesday, Nov. 21, time TBD, as we share readers' most common Thanksgiving questions. Thanksgiving can be a high-stress time in the kitchen. If you find yourself stumped, drop us a line on our Facebook page . We'll check in throughout the coming days and try to help. Obviously we can't do specific recipe searches, but we'll try to answer as many of your general cooking questions as we can. ALSO: Apples 101 ... and 52 recipes Go behind the scenes at the Test Kitchen Browse hundreds of recipes from the L.A. Times Test Kitchen You can find Noelle Carter on Facebook , Google+ , Twitter and Pinterest . Email Noelle at
March 13, 2012 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Election day has arrived -- at Frontier Airlines . For the first time, the Denver-based airline on Monday asked fliers to vote for the next animal  that should grace the tail of one of its planes. And here's a game-changer in this election: Not all 18 contenders follow the cute-and-cuddly model. In fact, some are downright off-putting. Fans may cast their ballot for hopefuls such as Paula the Pig and Duke the Arctic Dog (high on the cute index) or Doug the Dung Beetle and Samson the Sloth (uh, freakish and strange)
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