Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFacebook Page
IN THE NEWS

Facebook Page

BUSINESS
April 6, 2012 | David Lazarus
Who owns your personal information - you or the business you share it with? It's a fundamental question that gets to the heart of whether existing privacy protections are too strict or not strict enough. It also addresses matters of accountability when data go astray, as was the case this week when a major credit card processing company said as many as 1.5 million card numbers may have been stolen by hackers. I wrote on Tuesday about the lack of adequate disclosure rules when people's privacy is violated.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
March 20, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
In a court decision that could exist only in our modern age, a man in Ohio was given the choice of posting a court-approved apology to his estranged wife on his Facebook page every day for 30 days, or facing up to 60 days of jail time. Mark Byron, a photographer in Cincinnati, chose the forced Facebook apology, until suddenly he didn't. On day 26 he abruptly stopped posting the lengthy apology written by the court magistrate, saying it violated his right to free speech. Byron told the Associated Press he was willing to go to jail to protect his rights, but it turns out that it won't be necessary.  Judge Jon Seive of Hamilton County Domestic Court said Monday that the man had posted the Facebook apology long enough, the AP reported.
NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Jeff Spurrier
Furniture maker Cliff Spencer's workshop in Marina del Rey is a long way from where Paul Vander Werf lives near Trona, northeast of Ridgecrest, Calif. In Trona, the area averages fewer than 4 inches of rain a year. The topsoil is high desert hard pan that bakes in summer and freezes in winter. When filmmakers want a location to convey a world without water, they go to Trona. Vander Werf moved to the high desert after 10 years in rainy Hawaii, so he wanted solutions to the difficult growing climate.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Can a person's Facebook profile reveal what kind of employee he or she might be? The answer is yes, and with unnerving accuracy, according to a new paper published in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology. And if you are smugly thinking to yourself, "I've carefully wiped my Facebook page of any incriminating photos, comments and wall posts," - well, it turns out you may still not have hidden your true nature from future employers: On a rating scale that examines key personality attributes that indicate future job success, you might get rated high in conscientiousness and possibly low on extroversion.
NATIONAL
August 14, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
Expect a kinder, gentler Missouri State Fair from here on out. This week, the Missouri State Fair Commission ordered that officials and contractors hired by the state's rodeo association -- which would include cowboys and clowns -- complete sensitivity training before they are allowed to perform at the state fair again. What could prompt such a thing? The jeers of a clown. In a provocative bit of satire that went viral, a rodeo clown in Sedalia put a broomstick up his pants, donned a Barack Obama mask and asked the crowd whether it wanted to see a bull run over the president.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2012 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Jason Aldean has apologized for inappropriate behavior with "American Idol" contestant Brittany Kerr - who's not his wife but is an NBA cheerleader - after photos of the country star smooching Kerr at a Sunset Strip bar earlier in the week went online Sunday. "The truth is that I screwed up," Aldean wrote on his Facebook page after the incriminating photos went live . "I had too much to drink, let the party get out of hand and acted inappropriately at a bar. I left alone, caught the bus to our next show and that's the end of the story.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Jeff Spurrier
Jamie Jamison remembers her early introduction to woad. She was on a road trip with her parents, stopping at a Stuckey's shop and seeing a tiny souvenir Navajo rug that illustrated where the natural dyes came from. She has her own now -- blues, greens and yellows, all grown from her yard. Yellow is easy. Even onion skins will make a usable yellow. Blue, however, is another story. For that she is growing woad, Isatis tinctoria , a member of the mustard family. Woad originated in southern Europe and western Asia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2013 | By Joel Rubin and Robert Faturechi
The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department apologized to anyone who might have been offended by a comedian's racist and off-color stand-up routine at a luncheon and said it will be "reviewed. " About 600 to 700 people, many in uniforms, attended the Sheriff's Day Luncheon, where comedian Edwin San Juan delivered a 30-minute performance that was filled with sexually explicit and racist humor, people in attendance said. "He managed to insult every ethnic group," said one attendee, who requested that his name not be used.
NEWS
June 18, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
"Tip the world on its side and everything loose will land in Los Angeles," Frank Lloyd Wright reportedly said. That looseness -- a spirit of experimentation, a refusal to be bound by convention -- will be on display June 23 when the MAK Center for Art and Achitecture hosts a tour of groundbreaking modern homes by Frank Gehry , Neil M. Denari Architects, Eric Owen Moss and artist Peter Alexander.  The tour was organized in...
NATIONAL
January 10, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
HOUSTON -- A Texas artist who fled to Mexico after he was caught on tape defacing a Picasso painting at a Houston museum is expected to appear before a judge after surrendering at the border this week. Uriel Landeros is expected to face two felony charges of criminal mischief and felony graffiti. If convicted, he faces up to 10 years in prison. Landeros, 22, a University of Houston student originally from South Texas, fled last summer after he was caught on a cellphone video by a fellow museum patron spray-painting a stencil of a bullfighter killing a bull and the word "conquista" -- Spanish for "conquered" -- on Picasso's "Woman in a Red Armchair" at Houston's Menil Collection on June 13. Landeros crossed back into the U.S. on Tuesday via a border bridge in the city of McAllen and surrendered to a U.S. marshal, according to Sara Marie Kinney, a spokeswoman for the Harris County district attorney's office.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|