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NEWS
June 28, 2013 | By Jeff Spurrier
Furniture maker Cliff Spencer's workshop in Marina del Rey is a long way from where Paul Vander Werf lives near Trona, northeast of Ridgecrest, Calif. In Trona, the area averages fewer than 4 inches of rain a year. The topsoil is high desert hard pan that bakes in summer and freezes in winter. When filmmakers want a location to convey a world without water, they go to Trona. Vander Werf moved to the high desert after 10 years in rainy Hawaii, so he wanted solutions to the difficult growing climate.
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TRAVEL
July 17, 2011 | By Carolyn Lyons, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Florence has changed," my friend Alessandra told me on the phone. "There's a new spirit here. " "I don't believe it," I said. "I know Florentines; they're conservative people who hate change. " "Come and see for yourself. I'm going on a trip. You can have my apartment," Alessandra said. It was an offer I couldn't refuse. Although Florence was the birthplace of the Renaissance, and its entire center has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site, both of us worried that it had become tourist hell.
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The California golden poppies aren't popping right now at the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve in Lancaster. Southern Californians wait each year to see whether the state flower will turn the reserve and surrounding areas into fields of blinding orange. "Debbie Downer warning ... we probably won't really have a peak at all this year. Many of the plants that have managed to squeeze out a small poppy have desiccated mid-bloom," says a post on the reserve's Facebook page.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | By Paul Goff
We discovered the Ruin about 12 years ago when it was a small, abandoned stone house. We were hiking in Pioneertown's Pipes Canyon, and there it was, all by itself in a cove-like setting of boulders and desert plants and barely the remains of a road to get to it. We hiked back about a year after and the roof had been knocked in, or it had caved in after years of weather and neglect. A few months later, on another visit, we saw the western wall where the front door and window once stood were gone.
NATIONAL
July 20, 2012 | By Robin Abcarian
The family of 23-year-old Micayla Medek went through an almost unimaginable emotional torture Friday. They knew she'd been wounded in the Aurora, Colo., movie theater shooting shortly after midnight Thursday; her friends who'd accompanied her to “The Dark Knight Rises” told them as much. But it took nearly 20 hours after the gunman killed 12 people and wounded 58 others to get the awful news. Late Friday, they learned that Cayla, as they called her, was one of 10 people who died in the movie theater.
NEWS
July 9, 2013 | By Jeff Spurrier
Jamie Jamison remembers her early introduction to woad. She was on a road trip with her parents, stopping at a Stuckey's shop and seeing a tiny souvenir Navajo rug that illustrated where the natural dyes came from. She has her own now -- blues, greens and yellows, all grown from her yard. Yellow is easy. Even onion skins will make a usable yellow. Blue, however, is another story. For that she is growing woad, Isatis tinctoria , a member of the mustard family. Woad originated in southern Europe and western Asia.
NATIONAL
April 10, 2012 | By David Horsey
Facebook, the funky little social media operation that began as a way for horny Harvard guys to meet girls, has turned into an Internet juggernaut. On its way to an initial public stock offering that will probably bring in $100 billion, Facebook has decided to spend one of those millions on a tiny company with a staff of just 13 people. That tiny company is called Instagram, purveyor of a photo sharing and enhancement application for smartphones. Instagram's app has become so popular that it has morphed into an alternative avenue for communicating with family and friends.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Can a person's Facebook profile reveal what kind of employee he or she might be? The answer is yes, and with unnerving accuracy, according to a new paper published in the Journal of Applied Social Psychology. And if you are smugly thinking to yourself, "I've carefully wiped my Facebook page of any incriminating photos, comments and wall posts," - well, it turns out you may still not have hidden your true nature from future employers: On a rating scale that examines key personality attributes that indicate future job success, you might get rated high in conscientiousness and possibly low on extroversion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2011 | By Richard Winton and Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
A music executive critically wounded by a gunman who opened fire Friday in Hollywood died Monday, Los Angeles police said. John C. Atterberry, 40, of Hollywood Hills was driving near the intersection of Sunset Boulevard and Vine Street when he was shot three times in the face and neck by the gunman, later identified by authorities as Tyler Brehm, 26, of Los Angeles. Brehm repeatedly fired a .40-caliber handgun at motorists, police said. Atterberry's silver Mercedes-Benz coupe was one of several cars Brehm shot at from close range.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Cheers to Florence Detlor, who at 101 was recently revealed as Facebook's oldest user. On Monday, Facebook's Chief Operating Officer, Sheryl Sandberg, posted a photo of herself, Mark Zuckerberg, and Detlor smiling cheerfully in the company's offices on her Facebook page. " Honored to meet Florence Detlor, who at 101 years old is the oldest registered Facebook user. Thank you for visiting us Florence!   - with Mark Zuckerberg. " Sandberg wrote in a note accompanying the photo.
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