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Facial Expressions

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SCIENCE
November 29, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
When it comes to judging a person's emotional state, we may not rely on facial expressions as much as we think. Instead, it's body language that tells the story. Of course, it's easy to tell the difference between a wide grin and a pouty frown. But according to a study published Thursday in the journal Science , the facial expressions that go along with moments of intense celebration or frustration, success or failure, may be harder to parse than the accompanying body language.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
"The Gospel According to the Other Mary" is now another "Other Mary," the "Mary" we have been waiting for. John Adams' Eastertide combination of Passion and oratorio was commissioned by the Los Angeles Philharmonic and given its premiere late last spring at Walt Disney Concert Hall. Impressive and stirring as it was, the work felt a masterpiece still in the making. It was long (135 minutes rather than the 90 minutes expected) and unwieldy. It was delivered late and required a draining last-minute preparation for Gustavo Dudamel and the orchestra at the same time they were already overextended by staging Mozart's "Don Giovanni.
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SPORTS
May 19, 2012 | By Mark Medina
There's many versions of the Kobe face. Bryant clenches his jaw after making a key basket. He profusively chews on his jersey during competitive moments. He glares both at opponents and officials after getting fouled, particularly if it's not called. And apparently, Bryant has looked at Lakers Coach Mike Brown increduously when he suggested switching offensive sets to free him up from harder defensive assignments. It seems that happens a lot because Brown nailed down Bryant's "child face" please expression in the video above.
SCIENCE
November 29, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
When it comes to judging a person's emotional state, we may not rely on facial expressions as much as we think. Instead, it's body language that tells the story. Of course, it's easy to tell the difference between a wide grin and a pouty frown. But according to a study published Thursday in the journal Science , the facial expressions that go along with moments of intense celebration or frustration, success or failure, may be harder to parse than the accompanying body language.
NEWS
April 17, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
If you were to travel anywhere in the globe -- even to visit remote tribes who have scant contact with the larger world -- would people be able to read your emotions from your facial expressions (happiness, sadness, disgust, etc.) and would you be able to read theirs? In other words, do people smile when they're happy, wrinkle their noses when disgusted, the world over? Scientists have long thought so, but authors of a new study challenge the idea. Charles Darwin argued in “The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals” that basic facial expressions are universal -- implying that are hard-wired within us, the product of natural selection.
SCIENCE
June 28, 2003 | Allison M. Heinrichs, Times Staff Writer
The human ability to look people in the eye and tell if they're lying may have evolved from our primate ancestors, suggests a study published in the current issue of the journal Nature. A threatening bark or a friendly coo is often enough to allow monkeys to determine the meaning of such calls but -- like humans -- sound alone doesn't seem to be the only clue monkeys use to discover the implications behind these auditory expressions.
NEWS
January 9, 1998 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What started Siu Wa Tang wondering was the incident in Changchun, China, more than two years ago. Tang, chairman of the UC Irvine department of psychiatry, was visiting pharmaceutical factories, and the Chinese plant managers greeted him with courtesy. But they took an instant dislike to his colleague, a young American academic who seemingly had done nothing to offend. What angered the Chinese? Tang thinks he knows now. It was probably just the look on his face.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2010 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
The box-office phenomenon "Avatar" has become well known for its technological advancements and visual triumphs -- it creates a photo-realistic universe where the alien creatures seem to live and breathe, its immersive 3-D somehow making viewers forget that they're watching images on a screen. So, how exactly did director James Cameron perform this feat and create a watershed moment in cinematic evolution? It took more than 3,000 people and 10,000 computers roughly 4 1/2 years to create Pandora, the verdant planet that is the setting for the science fiction-adventure film, and its 10-foot-tall blue-skinned inhabitants known as the Na'vi.
HEALTH
October 23, 2006 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
THAT signature family expression of joy or hangdog remorse may be more than a matter of monkey see, monkey do. It may be hard-wired into our brains. By comparing the videotaped facial responses of 21 people born blind with those of their family members, researchers at the University of Haifa in Israel found similarities in expressions of concentration, sadness, anger, disgust, joy and surprise.
NEWS
December 24, 1987 | Associated Press
Jokes are funnier if the audience already is smiling. This is another theory of 19th-Century naturalist Charles Darwin. It has been proven by a modern researcher. According to Discover magazine, West German social psychologist Fritz Strack recently proved that even a "smile" forced by holding a pen in the teeth with the lips pulled back significantly, increased the humor "smilers" saw in a series of cartoons.
NEWS
September 18, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times
You may want to think twice before sticking that pacifier back in your baby boy's mouth: Three new studies, published Tuesday as a single research report, find that heavy pacifier use leads to stunted emotional development among males. The researchers, led by scientists from the University of Wisconsin, did not spend the years it would take to track a single group of kids from infancy through adulthood. Instead, they conducted three separate experiments that attempted to get at the same developmental stages.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2012 | By Robert Abele
A low-budget, no-excitement thriller, "The Victim" was written and directed by Michael Biehn, who also stars as a loner whose chance encounter with a frantic stripper leads to all sorts of mayhem. Annie (Jennifer Blanc) turns up at the cabin where Biehn's Kyle lives with a tale of a woodsy tryst with dirty cops, a friend (Danielle Harris) murdered and herself the next target. He springs into action as a wild-eyed protector, leading to some premium-cable-ish sexy time with Annie. It seems she has the emotional fortitude to set aside her fear of death to purr seductively over her savior's well-preserved bod. (Blanc happens to be Biehn's wife.)
SPORTS
May 19, 2012 | By Mark Medina
There's many versions of the Kobe face. Bryant clenches his jaw after making a key basket. He profusively chews on his jersey during competitive moments. He glares both at opponents and officials after getting fouled, particularly if it's not called. And apparently, Bryant has looked at Lakers Coach Mike Brown increduously when he suggested switching offensive sets to free him up from harder defensive assignments. It seems that happens a lot because Brown nailed down Bryant's "child face" please expression in the video above.
NEWS
April 17, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
If you were to travel anywhere in the globe -- even to visit remote tribes who have scant contact with the larger world -- would people be able to read your emotions from your facial expressions (happiness, sadness, disgust, etc.) and would you be able to read theirs? In other words, do people smile when they're happy, wrinkle their noses when disgusted, the world over? Scientists have long thought so, but authors of a new study challenge the idea. Charles Darwin argued in “The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals” that basic facial expressions are universal -- implying that are hard-wired within us, the product of natural selection.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Charlie Callas, the veteran comedian who punctuated his zany, character-oriented comedy routines with a bizarre array of facial expressions and sound effects, has died. He was 83. Callas, a resident of Las Vegas, died Thursday evening of natural causes in a hospice, said his son Mark. A former drummer for the Tommy Dorsey Orchestra and other big bands who switched to comedy in the mid-1960s, Callas once described himself as being "like a little kid running loose in the living room.
HEALTH
March 15, 2010 | By Judy Foreman, Special to The Times
I cry. At mushy Hallmark commercials in which the son finally gets home on Christmas Eve. At weddings because everybody's so happy. At funerals because everybody's so sad. Even watching the Olympics, when I bond with the skaters who get teary because they've finally won. But why, really, do I — do any of us — cry? The main reason, say evolutionary biologists and neuroscientists, is because we're human. As far as scientists can tell, no other creature cries emotional tears the way we humans do, despite scattered reports of an elephant or gorilla not just vocalizing in distress but actually shedding tears.
NEWS
October 13, 1999
Re "Top Designers Reveal Some Ideas to See Us Through Spring" (Oct. 11). Sex appeal? Try sick appeal! The pathetic, skeletal bodies, sunken eyes and haunted facial expressions of the models accompanying the article are far more riveting than the outfits they are wearing. Does the fashion industry still get a pass on idealized anorexia and bulimia? The article reports that the clothing was so transparent, the fashion press worried about their photos making it into family newspapers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2010 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
The box-office phenomenon "Avatar" has become well known for its technological advancements and visual triumphs -- it creates a photo-realistic universe where the alien creatures seem to live and breathe, its immersive 3-D somehow making viewers forget that they're watching images on a screen. So, how exactly did director James Cameron perform this feat and create a watershed moment in cinematic evolution? It took more than 3,000 people and 10,000 computers roughly 4 1/2 years to create Pandora, the verdant planet that is the setting for the science fiction-adventure film, and its 10-foot-tall blue-skinned inhabitants known as the Na'vi.
SCIENCE
August 17, 2009 | Melissa Healy
Of the many things that long-term alcohol addiction can steal -- careers, lives, health, memory -- one of its most heartbreaking tolls is on relationships. Alcoholics, researchers have long known, have a tendency to misread emotional cues, sometimes taking offense when none was intended or failing to pick up on a loved one's sadness, joy, anger or disappointment. The misunderstandings can result in more drinking, and more deterioration of relationships and lives. How does alcohol do all that?
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