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Factitious Disorder

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NEWS
May 12, 1991
Please pass on a hearty "well done" to Shari Roan for her revealing articles on factitious disorders, ("Playing for Sympathy" and "The Factitious Career: Faking the Faces of Illness," April 21). Her accuracy and research do her credit. These cases test the acumen and patience of any physician and will even set physicians at odds with each other over diagnosis and treatment. The cases we have discovered in our hospital are known to all floors and are well known to the emergency room, where they often come at night to test the discernment of almost every new physicians on call.
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HEALTH
August 7, 2006 | Elena Conis
Patients with dramatic tales of maladies that turned out to be made-up occasionally came to the Central Middlesex Hospital in England, where Richard Asher was a senior physician in the late 1940s. Asher wasn't the first to notice such patients -- but he was the first to bring them to the medical community's attention and give their common condition a name: Munchausen's syndrome.
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NEWS
April 21, 1991 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Faking illness isn't uncommon. Children do it all the time. Even adults find plenty of reasons to become ill. Malingerers, for example, are people who fabricate illness or injury because of an obvious incentive: to avoid work or military duty or to obtain financial compensation, says psychologist Paul Lees-Haley. Lees-Haley, a well-known researcher on malingering, tells of one young man committed to a mental institution for schizophrenia who refused to cooperate in his treatment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
San Bernardino County juvenile authorities have taken two young girls away from their mother, alleging that the woman was exhibiting signs of Munchausen syndrome by proxy, a condition in which a parent says a child is ill to gain sympathetic attention. The girls were seized Tuesday by the San Bernardino County district attorney on behalf of the juvenile court. The alleged victimized child was a 2-year-old who had visited emergency rooms and doctors' offices 58 times, Deputy Dist. Atty.
HEALTH
August 7, 2006 | Elena Conis
Patients with dramatic tales of maladies that turned out to be made-up occasionally came to the Central Middlesex Hospital in England, where Richard Asher was a senior physician in the late 1940s. Asher wasn't the first to notice such patients -- but he was the first to bring them to the medical community's attention and give their common condition a name: Munchausen's syndrome.
NEWS
May 10, 1996 | From Associated Press
A woman once named "mother of the year" by Nancy Reagan was in court for allegedly abusing two foster children in her care in a case that prosecutors attributed to a rare psychological disorder. Prosecutors allege that Yvonne Eldridge starved the two girls and told doctors they suffered from a long list of problems that included vomiting, constipation, seizures, lack of appetite, dehydration, migraine headaches and acute diarrhea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
San Bernardino County juvenile authorities have taken two young girls away from their mother, alleging that the woman was exhibiting signs of Munchausen syndrome by proxy, a condition in which a parent says a child is ill to gain sympathetic attention. The girls were seized Tuesday by the San Bernardino County district attorney on behalf of the juvenile court. The alleged victimized child was a 2-year-old who had visited emergency rooms and doctors' offices 58 times, Deputy Dist. Atty.
NEWS
June 5, 1996 | Associated Press
Eight years ago, foster mother Yvonne Eldridge was honored at the White House for her dedication to her children. On Tuesday she faced up to seven years in prison for abusing them. Eldridge, 44, cried when a Contra Costa County Superior Court jury delivered the verdict Monday after two days of deliberations.
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | BETTIJANE LEVINE and SHARI ROAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Michele and Bill Beideman desperately want their baby back. The question is: Should they get him? It has been an agonizing seven months since the Las Vegas mother took her son, Corbin, 2 1/2, to UCLA Medical Center to find out why he was underweight and sickly--and seven months since doctors refused to return him. A UCLA medical team says the baby is healthy, that it's Michele, 29, who is sick.
NEWS
June 5, 1996 | Associated Press
Eight years ago, foster mother Yvonne Eldridge was honored at the White House for her dedication to her children. On Tuesday she faced up to seven years in prison for abusing them. Eldridge, 44, cried when a Contra Costa County Superior Court jury delivered the verdict Monday after two days of deliberations.
NEWS
May 10, 1996 | From Associated Press
A woman once named "mother of the year" by Nancy Reagan was in court for allegedly abusing two foster children in her care in a case that prosecutors attributed to a rare psychological disorder. Prosecutors allege that Yvonne Eldridge starved the two girls and told doctors they suffered from a long list of problems that included vomiting, constipation, seizures, lack of appetite, dehydration, migraine headaches and acute diarrhea.
NEWS
May 24, 1992 | BETTIJANE LEVINE and SHARI ROAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Michele and Bill Beideman desperately want their baby back. The question is: Should they get him? It has been an agonizing seven months since the Las Vegas mother took her son, Corbin, 2 1/2, to UCLA Medical Center to find out why he was underweight and sickly--and seven months since doctors refused to return him. A UCLA medical team says the baby is healthy, that it's Michele, 29, who is sick.
NEWS
May 12, 1991
Please pass on a hearty "well done" to Shari Roan for her revealing articles on factitious disorders, ("Playing for Sympathy" and "The Factitious Career: Faking the Faces of Illness," April 21). Her accuracy and research do her credit. These cases test the acumen and patience of any physician and will even set physicians at odds with each other over diagnosis and treatment. The cases we have discovered in our hospital are known to all floors and are well known to the emergency room, where they often come at night to test the discernment of almost every new physicians on call.
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Faking illness isn't uncommon. Children do it all the time. Even adults find plenty of reasons to become ill. Malingerers, for example, are people who fabricate illness or injury because of an obvious incentive: to avoid work or military duty or to obtain financial compensation, says psychologist Paul Lees-Haley. Lees-Haley, a well-known researcher on malingering, tells of one young man committed to a mental institution for schizophrenia who refused to cooperate in his treatment.
OPINION
November 5, 2013 | By Theodore Dalrymple
When the 1980 edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (commonly known as the DSM-3) was being prepared, psychiatrist Allen Frances lobbied for the inclusion of a new diagnosis: masochistic personality disorder. His push failed, and by the time the fourth edition came out in 1994 (edited by Frances), he was glad it had. He no longer believed such a condition existed. Masochistic personality disorder, as Frances had conceived it, "diagnosed" those whose typical behavior brought them unhappiness by "self-sacrifice in the service of maintaining relationships or self-esteem.
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | SHARI ROAN, Times Health Writer
When Anna's fiance broke off their engagement, it was too much for her to bear. Devastated and feeling abandoned, the 35-year-old corporate secretary went to work one day shortly after the breakup and did something inexplicable. She told everyone she had terminal breast cancer. But she didn't just stop at that. Soon, Anna began to imitate the look of someone very ill.
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