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BUSINESS
October 15, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL
Manufacturing output at Mexico's maquiladoras, the border plants that use low-cost labor to assemble products destined mainly for the U.S. market, fell 18% in August. Manufacturing overall in Mexico declined 6.3% compared with a year earlier. Mexico's manufacturers have been hard hit by the U.S. economic slowdown and the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, which have caused demand to soften. Makers of autos and automotive parts, consumer electronics and equipment are especially affected.
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BUSINESS
November 29, 2013 | By Shan Li
TIJUANA - In an industrial park five miles east of downtown Tijuana, Ariel Ceja toils in a white room bustling with assembly workers hunched over blue tables. A master scheduler, Ceja is in charge of all steps of production at this factory nestled inside a cavernous warehouse. A cluster of anonymous buildings surround the facility. Nearby are pitted roads, and just a few minutes away by car is the Tijuana airport and a university. San Diego-based 3D Robotics moved into this once-vacant spot in June, producing affordable drones and electronic parts destined for customers in the U.S. and around the world.
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BUSINESS
August 25, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rockwell to Build Auto Parts Plant in Mexico: The Seal Beach-based company said it will build a 63,000-square-foot manufacturing plant in Queretaro to supply door and roof components to Mexico's booming automotive industry. Rockwell currently exports the parts from North America to Chrysler and Volkswagen assembly plants in Mexico. The new plant will employ about 150 people.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
Nissan Motor Co. said it will spend about $2 billion to build an automobile factory in Aguascalientes, Mexico, as part of the company's North American growth strategy. The plant is scheduled to open late next year with the capacity to build about 175,000 compact vehicles per year, the company said, complementing Nissan's two existing Mexican factories. Nissan wants to build vehicles outside Japan and closer to the markets in which they will be sold to dampen the profit-killing effect of the strong yen and to save money on transportation.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1999 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tustin-based PairGain Technologies Inc., which has seen its profit margins squeezed this year by competitors, said Friday that it is moving most of its manufacturing operations to Mexico. Company officials said that fewer than 100 of its 600 employees in Orange County would lose their jobs. PairGain has more than 800 employees worldwide. The company said the transition, which began last month, would be completed by the middle of next year.
NEWS
August 12, 1998 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Labor Secretary Alexis M. Herman should meet with her Mexican counterpart to determine why unsafe working conditions persist at a closely watched Tijuana factory despite repeated inspections and fines, a federal agency recommended Tuesday. So-called ministerial consultations were urged by the National Administrative Office, an arm of the Labor Department that monitors complaints about working conditions in Mexico and Canada under the North American Free Trade Agreement.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mexico's Maquiladora Industry Grows: The industry, which is situated mostly on the U.S.-Mexico border and imports parts and components duty-free for export production, posted a value-added growth rate of 5.6% in the first four months of 1994, said the state-owned Instituto Nacional de Estadistica Geografia e Informatica. Inegi said Mexico had 2,059 maquiladora plants in April, up 0.8% from the same period a year ago.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an apparent attempt to show they are serious about enforcing environmental regulations, Mexican authorities have halted some construction at the site of Chrysler's Ram pickup truck plant, scheduled to open south of Saltillo early next year. Officials in charge of environmental protection said Wednesday that the government took the action because the company failed to conduct environmental impact studies or obtain building permits.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rockwell International on Tuesday said it will build an automotive parts manufacturing plant in Mexico that will employ 150 people. The plant will be located in Queretaro, about 120 miles northwest of Mexico City, and will make window regulators, or controls, sunroofs, and door latches for Chrysler and Volkswagen vehicles to be sold in Mexico, according to Rockwell, which has its headquarters in Seal Beach. The 63,000-square-foot plant will be built on a 6.
BUSINESS
May 28, 1995 | EVELYN IRITANI and CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
While most of Mexico suffers the ill effects of last winter's peso crash, a far different story is unfolding along the northern border of Mexico's Baja Peninsula. Asian investors are fueling an industrial explosion that has transformed this border city into the world's biggest center of television production.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2007 | Steve Chawkins, Times Staff Writer
On a warm May weekend in this Central Valley town, the irony was as thick as melting fudge. As usual, the annual Chocolate Festival was drawing hordes of fun-seekers. However, they were streaming in by the thousands just two weeks after Hershey Co. -- Oakdale's biggest employer and the nation's biggest candy company -- announced its plan to close its sprawling plant, eliminate all 575 jobs and open a new factory in Monterrey, Mexico.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Honda Motor Co. will spend at least $8 million to boost capacity by two-thirds at a Mexican assembly plant and switch all of its production to CR-V sport utility vehicles to meet rising North American sales. Honda will build 50,000 CR-Vs a year at El Salto, near Guadalajara, where it now makes Accord sedans at a rate of 30,000 a year. About half the CR-Vs built at El Salto will be sold in Mexico, and the rest will be shipped to the U.S. and a variety of Latin American markets.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL
Manufacturing output at Mexico's maquiladoras, the border plants that use low-cost labor to assemble products destined mainly for the U.S. market, fell 18% in August. Manufacturing overall in Mexico declined 6.3% compared with a year earlier. Mexico's manufacturers have been hard hit by the U.S. economic slowdown and the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, which have caused demand to soften. Makers of autos and automotive parts, consumer electronics and equipment are especially affected.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time in more than a decade, employment and output at the foreign-owned factories along the U.S.-Mexico border are in decline. This has prompted concerns that investment in Mexico's manufacturing sector could slow, rippling across the broader economy. After 12 years of steady growth, the output at these factories, known as maquiladoras, could slide by 3% for all of 2001, said Rolando Gonzalez Barron, president of Mexico's maquiladora trade association.
NEWS
July 26, 2000 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. authorities said Tuesday they have fined a Mexican factory for improperly disposing of its hazardous wastes north of the border--the first time a Mexican business has been sanctioned for violating U.S. environmental law. Maquiladora Chambers de Mexico, a leather belt manufacturer in Pitiquito, 75 miles south of the Arizona border in the Mexican state of Sonora, agreed to pay a $3,164 fine and train personnel in neighboring factories on waste disposal laws in the United States and Mexico.
BUSINESS
December 4, 1999 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tustin-based PairGain Technologies Inc., which has seen its profit margins squeezed this year by competitors, said Friday that it is moving most of its manufacturing operations to Mexico. Company officials said that fewer than 100 of its 600 employees in Orange County would lose their jobs. PairGain has more than 800 employees worldwide. The company said the transition, which began last month, would be completed by the middle of next year.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time in more than a decade, employment and output at the foreign-owned factories along the U.S.-Mexico border are in decline. This has prompted concerns that investment in Mexico's manufacturing sector could slow, rippling across the broader economy. After 12 years of steady growth, the output at these factories, known as maquiladoras, could slide by 3% for all of 2001, said Rolando Gonzalez Barron, president of Mexico's maquiladora trade association.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Honda Motor Co. will spend at least $8 million to boost capacity by two-thirds at a Mexican assembly plant and switch all of its production to CR-V sport utility vehicles to meet rising North American sales. Honda will build 50,000 CR-Vs a year at El Salto, near Guadalajara, where it now makes Accord sedans at a rate of 30,000 a year. About half the CR-Vs built at El Salto will be sold in Mexico, and the rest will be shipped to the U.S. and a variety of Latin American markets.
NEWS
August 12, 1998 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Labor Secretary Alexis M. Herman should meet with her Mexican counterpart to determine why unsafe working conditions persist at a closely watched Tijuana factory despite repeated inspections and fines, a federal agency recommended Tuesday. So-called ministerial consultations were urged by the National Administrative Office, an arm of the Labor Department that monitors complaints about working conditions in Mexico and Canada under the North American Free Trade Agreement.
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