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BUSINESS
October 25, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Intel Corp. said it is postponing the opening of a $1.3-billion Texas semiconductor plant by a year because of lagging demand for memory chips, forcing it to shift to other chips more in demand. Intel now plans to open the plant in 2000, not 1999, spokesman Howard High said. High said the delay is because of slack demand for flash memory chips, which Intel disclosed in its third-quarter earnings announcement earlier this week.
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BUSINESS
July 27, 2010 | By Terry Box
ARLINGTON, Texas — Every day at the General Motors Co. assembly plant, harried workers pull 15 of their freshly built sport utility vehicles off the line and climb all over them. It's not meant to be fun. They check the big vehicles high and low for fit and finish, squeaks and rattles, air and water leaks, and other problems — and typically find few flaws, despite the plant's frantic pace since January. But as surviving domestic auto plants here and elsewhere continue to stretch their production capacities with month after month of 50-hour weeks, they may test the limits of their quality-control systems.
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BUSINESS
July 27, 2010 | By Terry Box
ARLINGTON, Texas — Every day at the General Motors Co. assembly plant, harried workers pull 15 of their freshly built sport utility vehicles off the line and climb all over them. It's not meant to be fun. They check the big vehicles high and low for fit and finish, squeaks and rattles, air and water leaks, and other problems — and typically find few flaws, despite the plant's frantic pace since January. But as surviving domestic auto plants here and elsewhere continue to stretch their production capacities with month after month of 50-hour weeks, they may test the limits of their quality-control systems.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Intel Corp. said it is postponing the opening of a $1.3-billion Texas semiconductor plant by a year because of lagging demand for memory chips, forcing it to shift to other chips more in demand. Intel now plans to open the plant in 2000, not 1999, spokesman Howard High said. High said the delay is because of slack demand for flash memory chips, which Intel disclosed in its third-quarter earnings announcement earlier this week.
BUSINESS
April 12, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an innovative effort to defray the enormous cost of modern computer chip factories, Texas Instruments announced Thursday that it had enlisted the government of Singapore, Hewlett-Packard and Japan's Canon Inc. as partners in a $330-million chip-making joint venture. The venture is one of the few American high-technology efforts in which a government entity is participating as an equity partner, and it is also one of the first to link a major chip vendor with major computer systems suppliers.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1987 | MARY ANN GALANTE, Times Staff Writer
Ironclad won't be tossing out its Tustin headquarters when it opens a 60,000-square-foot factory and distribution plant in Shreveport, La., early next year. Instead, the privately owned manufacturer of plastic trash bags plans "dramatic growth" over the next year at its Tustin facility, where almost 200 people are employed, company President John Marrelli said.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1986 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
A Houston-based oil company said Monday that it will close its second and last Southern California manufacturing plant because plummeting oil prices have prompted the oil industry to quit ordering new equipment. About 150 employees at the Los Nietos factory of National Supply Co. will be gradually laid off between now and the closing in early 1987, the company said. The plant, which opened in the 1930s, makes pumps used to remove fluids from oil wells. David A.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2005 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
Toyota Motor Corp. said Friday that rising global sales helped push up its profit by 2.1% for its fiscal second quarter, putting the world's second-largest automaker on track for its fourth straight year of record earnings. The gain comes as its American rivals General Motors Corp. and Ford Motor Co. are losing money and market share in the U.S. and are scrambling to cut production and employment. Tokyo-based Toyota said its profit rose to 303.7 billion yen ($2.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1985 | NANCY RIVERA, Times Staff Writer
The hard-hit semiconductor and computer industries continued to take their toll on Texas Instruments, which reported its second consecutive quarterly loss and announced a major retrenchment Friday. The Dallas-based company, whose losses in the third quarter climbed to $82.8 million, said it will reduce its manufacturing capacity, close two factories, eliminate 2,200 jobs worldwide and freeze wages for its remaining employees.
BUSINESS
February 8, 2006 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
The yawning gap between the world's two biggest automakers widened Tuesday as Toyota Motor Corp. posted record fiscal third-quarter profit while General Motors Corp. introduced a new round of cost-cutting to help halt its mounting losses. "It's a case of the rich getting richer and the poor getting poorer," said analyst Shelly Lombard at GimmeCredit, a New York corporate bond research firm.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1990 | GREGORY CROUCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allergan reported a $10.2-million loss for the fourth quarter Wednesday and said it would shut down a manufacturing plant here, eliminating 210 positions over the next year. The company, which makes eye-care and skin-care products, also said that it would cut 300 additional jobs worldwide as part of an effort to reduce expenses. To cover the costs of layoffs and the discontinuation of several products, Allergan took a one-time charge of $22.8 million in the quarter ended Dec. 31.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1993 | ROBERT BARKER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fifty years ago, Violet (Vi) Cowden served in the Women Air Force Service Pilots program, flying P-51 Mustangs and other fighter planes of World War II. Cowden and other women pilots flew planes fresh off factory assembly lines to embarkation points in California and New Jersey, freeing their male counterparts to fly combat missions. The 1,074 women who won their flight wings flew 60 million miles in service to their country.
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