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Factory Closings Orange County

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BUSINESS
March 10, 1999 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Medtronic Inc. said Tuesday it plans to close its Anaheim plant within two years, eliminating most of the 560 jobs to avoid duplicating work at another site that the company has acquired. Employees learned of the closure on Monday, the same day Medtronic completed its acquisition of the Minnesota-based Avecor Cardiovascular Inc. The Anaheim and Avecor facilities make devices that supply oxygen to blood that is rerouted outside of the body during heart surgery.
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BUSINESS
March 10, 1999 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Medtronic Inc. said Tuesday it plans to close its Anaheim plant within two years, eliminating most of the 560 jobs to avoid duplicating work at another site that the company has acquired. Employees learned of the closure on Monday, the same day Medtronic completed its acquisition of the Minnesota-based Avecor Cardiovascular Inc. The Anaheim and Avecor facilities make devices that supply oxygen to blood that is rerouted outside of the body during heart surgery.
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BUSINESS
May 21, 1998 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bringing an end to its manufacturing history in California, Vans Inc. said Wednesday it will close its shoe factory in Vista and fire 300 workers. The closure is the latest step in a three-year restructuring in which the maker of trendy footwear has emphasized marketing over manufacturing. Founded in Orange in 1966, Vans closed its manufacturing plant in the city in 1995, and laid off about 1,000 workers. The following year it moved its headquarters to Santa Fe Springs.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1995 | LESLEY WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Few if any of the 200 workers who turned out for a union rally in front of Vans Inc. shoe company believed they could stop the closing of their plant Monday, but Teamsters officials were not about to let it happen quietly. "It's a long shot," said Teamsters official Raul Lopez of a letter presented to the company Wednesday appealing for a last meeting. "But being the Teamsters, we're going to go down swinging."
NEWS
October 15, 1994 | JOHN O'DELL and HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
AST Research Inc.'s decision to lay off 10% of its workers and close its Fountain Valley manufacturing plant caught technology industry observers by surprise, but it shouldn't have--the computer company's top executive dropped the first hints last spring. At a conference in March, when other executives were complaining about corporate changes, the bearded, soft-spoken Pakistani who co-founded AST took the floor to present a different view. "If I do not change," AST Chairman Safi I.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1998 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bringing an end to its manufacturing history in California, Vans Inc. said Wednesday it will close its shoe factory in Vista and fire 300 workers. The closure is the latest step in a three-year restructuring in which the maker of trendy footwear has emphasized marketing over manufacturing. Founded in Orange in 1966, Vans closed its manufacturing plant in the city in 1995, and laid off about 1,000 workers. The following year it moved its headquarters to Santa Fe Springs.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1994 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
AST Research Inc., struggling to keep pace in the cutthroat personal computer business, said Friday that it will close its Fountain Valley manufacturing plant and lay off all 440 employees there as part of a major restructuring that will reduce its work force by 10% worldwide. The nation's sixth-largest computer maker, which employs 6,900, also said it expects to post a quarterly loss of up to $40 million--far worse than analysts had expected. AST stock dropped $1.
NEWS
October 15, 1994 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
AST Research Inc., struggling to keep pace in the cutthroat personal computer business, said Friday that it will close its Fountain Valley manufacturing plant, lay off its 440 employees and move operations there to an AST plant in Taiwan. The nation's sixth-largest computer maker, which employs 6,900, said it is moving to reduce its work force by 10% worldwide. It also reported that it expects a quarterly loss of up to $40 million--far worse than industry analysts had expected.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1995 | LESLEY WRIGHT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Few if any of the 200 workers who turned out for a union rally in front of Vans Inc. shoe company believed they could stop the closing of their plant Monday, but Teamsters officials were not about to let it happen quietly. "It's a long shot," said Teamsters official Raul Lopez of a letter presented to the company Wednesday appealing for a last meeting. "But being the Teamsters, we're going to go down swinging."
NEWS
October 15, 1994 | JOHN O'DELL and HOPE HAMASHIGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
AST Research Inc.'s decision to lay off 10% of its workers and close its Fountain Valley manufacturing plant caught technology industry observers by surprise, but it shouldn't have--the computer company's top executive dropped the first hints last spring. At a conference in March, when other executives were complaining about corporate changes, the bearded, soft-spoken Pakistani who co-founded AST took the floor to present a different view. "If I do not change," AST Chairman Safi I.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1994 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
AST Research Inc., struggling to keep pace in the cutthroat personal computer business, said Friday that it will close its Fountain Valley manufacturing plant and lay off all 440 employees there as part of a major restructuring that will reduce its work force by 10% worldwide. The nation's sixth-largest computer maker, which employs 6,900, also said it expects to post a quarterly loss of up to $40 million--far worse than analysts had expected. AST stock dropped $1.
NEWS
October 15, 1994 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
AST Research Inc., struggling to keep pace in the cutthroat personal computer business, said Friday that it will close its Fountain Valley manufacturing plant, lay off its 440 employees and move operations there to an AST plant in Taiwan. The nation's sixth-largest computer maker, which employs 6,900, said it is moving to reduce its work force by 10% worldwide. It also reported that it expects a quarterly loss of up to $40 million--far worse than industry analysts had expected.
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