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BUSINESS
July 5, 1994 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the picket line outside Caterpillar's sprawling tractor plant, John McCoy uses his head to display his disdain for his employer of 29 years: He wears a John Deere cap. Just up the street, a union billboard painted in Caterpillar's bold yellow colors announces: "You are entering a war zone. Caterpillar vs. its UAW employees." Such are the symbols of the nation's longest ongoing labor confrontation.
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BUSINESS
December 3, 2001 | Associated Press
Thousands of machinists at jet engine maker Pratt & Whitney on Sunday rejected a contract offer of a 10% pay raise over three years and voted to go on strike. The walkout, set to begin early this morning, would be the first at Pratt since 1985. "We're prepared to continue this process, whatever it takes to come up with a satisfactory contract," said James M. Parent, a spokesman for the International Assn. of Machinists and Aerospace Workers District 91, which represents 5,100 employees.
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NEWS
February 2, 1998 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With his jovial manner and many contributions to life in this village of 5,000, Martin Viessmann just doesn't seem to cut it as Class Enemy No. 1. His industrialist father and grandfather built and developed the furnace factory that employs about 3,500 people here and provided the heaters that warm most of their homes.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 19 days on strike against Volkswagen, unionized workers have won a victory that goes beyond the paycheck. The Volkswagen workers--the largest automotive union in Mexico--got a 14.7% increase in wages and benefits, more than double the rate of inflation. The settlement reflected labor's increasing muscle, which could grow with reforms that President Vicente Fox hopes to present to Congress in the next several months.
NEWS
March 7, 1998 | JEFF LEEDS
Unionized Anheuser-Busch workers in contract talks with their employer say they are prepared to strike as early as next week if the negotiations collapse. Eyeing a Sunday evening deadline for the talks, scores of employees at the brewer's sprawling Van Nuys plant walked a makeshift picket line Thursday, with many carrying signs saying they were "just practicing." But a spokesman for the International Brotherhood of Teamsters Local 896 said the workers were ready for a real work stoppage.
NEWS
September 5, 1994 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On this city's northeast side, where strip shopping centers give way to smokestacks and cornfields, 22nd Street is the demarcation line for a global battle on three fronts. It's where 4,000 workers--7% of the local work force--have set up picket lines to protest their treatment by three multinational employers: one Japanese, one British and one American.
NEWS
September 23, 1999 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 64 years old and close to retirement, Socorro Venegas has no trouble imagining who will succeed her at the onion factory in tiny King City--where good jobs are kept in the family. Venegas followed her husband to this Salinas Valley town from Mexico City 13 years ago. Three sons in turn followed them to the assembly line at the factory, Basic Vegetable Products.
NEWS
March 25, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joyce Howard, 25, is angry and hurting. Shooting pains run through her wrists, her arm muscles ache, and she's out of work. Her pain, she says, came from fileting 75 to 100 pounds of catfish an hour for four years at a processing plant here. It is fast, repetitive work--rippers, for example, are required to gut 32 fish a minute, and headsaw operators must behead one a second--all for $4.30 an hour. Her ailment continues despite surgery and therapy.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1998 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Caterpillar Inc. and the United Auto Workers union reached a tentative contract agreement Friday that, if ratified, will end one of the nation's longest, most contentious labor disputes of the 1990s. The company and its 13,000 UAW workers have been at odds since 1991, when the previous contract expired. The dispute prompted two lengthy strikes, the hiring of temporary replacements and the filing of more than 440 unfair labor practice complaints with the federal government.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 19 days on strike against Volkswagen, unionized workers have won a victory that goes beyond the paycheck. The Volkswagen workers--the largest automotive union in Mexico--got a 14.7% increase in wages and benefits, more than double the rate of inflation. The settlement reflected labor's increasing muscle, which could grow with reforms that President Vicente Fox hopes to present to Congress in the next several months.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2001 | BURT HERMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Deals to hire employees without all the treasured perks given German workers normally would cause an outcry from unions, but a plan by Volkswagen to do just that is getting uniform support--as a means to encourage flexibility and fight unemployment. VW, Europe's largest auto maker, agreed Tuesday to hire 3,500 workers to produce a new minivan in its home base of Wolfsburg.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2001 | From Reuters
Union leaders at the Mexican unit of Volkswagen said Tuesday that the German auto maker improved its pay offer in a bid to end a 10-day-old strike, but many workers reacted negatively as they began voting on the package. Union leaders presented VW's new offer of an 8.5% salary increase plus improved benefits worth an additional 1.7% of their wages to an assembly of workers at the VW plant in Puebla, about 60 miles east of Mexico City.
BUSINESS
August 20, 2001 | A Times Staff Writer
Teamster members working at a ConAgra vegetable dehydration plant in King City, Calif., are expected to approve a contract Thursday, officially ending a two-year strike that divided the Central California town. The first group of returning strikers is set to march back to the plant on Labor Day, Sept. 3. The strike was noteworthy for the determination of the employees. About 750 held the strike, out of a work force of 800.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2001 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Mexico's President Vicente Fox met recently in Detroit with United Auto Workers President Stephen P. Yokich and International Brotherhood of Teamsters President James P. Hoffa to discuss how to raise wage levels for Mexican workers. The talks were serious, not a mere public relations gesture. Fox and the U.S. unions share a common need to see Mexican wages and living standards rise. Mexico can't afford to rely on low-cost labor as a competitive advantage, and the U.S. unions, as well as the U.S.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
Boeing Co. and a union representing 3,200 machinists at its military aircraft division in St. Louis reached a tentative three-year agreement Thursday on wages and benefits. Union members will vote Sunday on the contract, which includes a $1,200 signing bonus and a wage increase of 3% in the first year and 4% in the final two years, said Bruce Darrough, a spokesman for District 837 of the International Assn. of Machinists.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A union campaign for recognition at a factory in northern Mexico was overwhelmingly defeated Friday after the government allowed the vote to be conducted through an open shop-floor count, despite a pledge to the United States last year to promote the use of secret ballots in labor disputes. Just four out of 501 workers voting at Duro de Rio Bravo, a subsidiary of Kentucky-based Duro Bag Manufacturing Corp.
NEWS
April 25, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what many view as a watershed development in Europe's largest economy, Germany on Friday appeared on the verge of its most serious bout of labor unrest in decades. Strikes by postal workers in Hamburg and autobahn maintenance employees in Cologne began Friday within hours of the announcement of overwhelming votes for industrial action. They seemed to be only the first shots in a major battle for higher wages.
NEWS
November 10, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the most closely watched labor actions against repetitive work, a bitter strike against the nation's largest catfish processor escalated Friday when workers began a boycott drive against a huge grocery chain that is selling the fish. About a dozen of the 900 workers who in September went on strike against Delta Pride Catfish of Indianola, Miss., held a rally here at a Winn-Dixie store to demand that the chain stop selling Delta Pride's products.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2001 | Reuters
Boeing Co.'s biggest union vowed Thursday to stop the aerospace giant from shifting the production of wings for its proposed 747X superjumbo jet to Japan, saying contract provisions forbid such a move. The International Assn. of Machinists and Aerospace Workers local said Boeing's plans to have Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. build 747X wings would cost thousands of union jobs.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2000 | Associated Press
Bridgestone Corp. workers stayed on the job during the weekend past a strike deadline and continued talks with the company, in a show for support for the tire maker, already plagued by questions about the safety of its products. Around-the-clock talks are expected to continue today. The United Steelworkers of America union, which represents 8,000 Bridgestone workers at nine U.S. plants, warned it was prepared to go on strike at a moment's notice if progress stalled.
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