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Factory Workers Labor Relations

BUSINESS
May 15, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Daimler-Benz's German union is considering an alliance with the United Auto Workers at Chrysler Corp. that would negotiate benefits for the 410,000 workers who would work for DaimlerChrysler, a Daimler board member said Thursday. The new "global labor council" being considered by the two unions would collectively bargain for benefits for DaimlerChrysler workers on both continents.
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NEWS
March 23, 1998 | From Associated Press
The United Auto Workers union approved a six-year contract with Caterpillar Inc. on Sunday, their first deal with the heavy equipment maker since 1991. The contract covers roughly 13,000 Caterpillar workers, most at plants in Aurora, Decatur and East Peoria in Illinois and at the company's Pontiac, Mich., plant. It also covers smaller numbers in Pennsylvania, Colorado and Tennessee. The vote at Local 974, the largest local covered by the contract, was 55% to 45% for the deal, UAW officials said.
NEWS
March 7, 1998 | JEFF LEEDS
Unionized Anheuser-Busch workers in contract talks with their employer say they are prepared to strike as early as next week if the negotiations collapse. Eyeing a Sunday evening deadline for the talks, scores of employees at the brewer's sprawling Van Nuys plant walked a makeshift picket line Thursday, with many carrying signs saying they were "just practicing." But a spokesman for the International Brotherhood of Teamsters Local 896 said the workers were ready for a real work stoppage.
NEWS
March 2, 1998 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has come down to 50 nameless workers, 50 union members still locked out of their assembly line jobs after six years of strikes and employment without a contract. The fate of the anonymous 50 is the bargaining chip that could either end the long-running war between the United Auto Workers and Caterpillar Inc.--the most costly American labor dispute of the last decade--or drive its combatants farther apart.
NEWS
February 23, 1998 | From Associated Press
The United Auto Workers voted Sunday to reject a new contract with Caterpillar Inc., continuing its six-year dispute with the nation's largest maker of earth-moving equipment. Jim Clingan, president of Local 974, the union's largest Caterpillar local, said members nationwide voted 58% to 42% against the contract. The union hall here erupted in applause when the contract, which was supported by the union leadership, was rejected.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
United Auto Workers members at General Motors Corp.'s Saturn plant in Tennessee, where pay is falling because of slow sales, could soon scrap the innovative labor teams that are part of the unit's folksy advertising image. Saturn is unique within GM because of its extensive use of team-based labor groups, which give workers expanded responsibilities for monitoring quality and costs. Workers in Spring Hill, Tenn.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1998 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Caterpillar Inc. and the United Auto Workers union reached a tentative contract agreement Friday that, if ratified, will end one of the nation's longest, most contentious labor disputes of the 1990s. The company and its 13,000 UAW workers have been at odds since 1991, when the previous contract expired. The dispute prompted two lengthy strikes, the hiring of temporary replacements and the filing of more than 440 unfair labor practice complaints with the federal government.
BUSINESS
February 2, 1998 | Associated Press
Caterpillar Inc. and the United Auto Workers are to resume full-scale negotiations today, more than six years since the last time the construction equipment maker and the union had a contract. Last year, officials from both sides held six meetings with a federal mediator to figure out where they stood. Those meetings led the officials to order talks between each UAW local and factory-level executives to settle individual concerns.
NEWS
February 2, 1998 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With his jovial manner and many contributions to life in this village of 5,000, Martin Viessmann just doesn't seem to cut it as Class Enemy No. 1. His industrialist father and grandfather built and developed the furnace factory that employs about 3,500 people here and provided the heaters that warm most of their homes.
NEWS
December 17, 1997 | From Associated Press
Workers at a small, Korean-owned factory made history Tuesday when their long-sought request to install an independent union was approved by Baja California officials who had tried to stop them. Along the U.S.-Mexico border, an industrial frontier of 2,700 factories, the only worker "advocates" have been government-backed union representatives who are absent or disengaged.
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