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Factory Workers Layoffs

BUSINESS
February 15, 1999 | Times Wire Services
German car maker BMW's cost-cutting drive at its loss-making Rover subsidiary will result in the loss of at least 5,000 jobs in the British automotive parts industry, the Independent newspaper in London reported. The newspaper said the figure was based on an estimate by a leading supplier. A spokesman for Rover said: "We have announced no [new] job cuts." An existing program of 2,500 voluntary cuts is close to being completed.
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BUSINESS
April 18, 1996 | JULIE PITTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As new Chairman and Chief Executive Gilbert Amelio insisted that the worst is over, troubled Apple Computer Inc. on Tuesday posted a worse-than-expected loss of $740 million for its second quarter and announced 2,800 layoffs, 1,500 more than projected. The double dose of bad news, announced after the stock market closed, marked the biggest shortfall in the Cupertino, Calif., computer maker's 20-year history.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1996 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that will cost about 550 workers their jobs, Nestle USA Inc. has announced it will shut down and sell its Oxnard plant, ending a decades-old operation that has been a steady source of employment for generations of residents. Nestle bought the plant in September amid a dispute between workers and the former owner, Nabisco Foods Group. Under Nabisco, the factory produced Ortega Mexican foods, A-1 Steak Sauce, Regina Vinegar and the world's supply of Grey Poupon mustard.
NEWS
April 3, 1994 | JENNIFER OLDHAM
After 28 years as a parts inspector at the city's Alcoa plant, Charles Adams may retire years earlier than he had planned. Adams, 50, said that last month's surprise announcement by the Aluminum Corp. of America that it will close the 56-year-old facility has left him with few options. Because of his long tenure, Adams is eligible through his union membership for retirement benefits. "I may try to get some training or some kind of schooling," Adams said. "It's hard. I just don't know."
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