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Factory Workers

WORLD
October 29, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A court in southern China has sentenced five shoe factory workers to as many as 3 1/2 years in prison after a strike in April, a court official and labor rights group said. The five were among 40 arrested after thousands went on strike in Dongguan -- an export manufacturing zone near Hong Kong -- to protest wages and working conditions, the New York-based China Labor Watch group reported.
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OPINION
March 3, 2013 | By Nikil Saval
When the first modern office buildings sprung up in America at the end of the 19th century, it was an unquestioned expectation that employees would show up for work there every day. Like the factory workers who came before them, office workers usually clocked in and out, and they sat at their desks - most arranged in highly regimented rows - from morning until early evening, under constant supervision. Even trips to the water cooler were often monitored. With the development of computers and more advanced telecommunications in the 1970s, some employees began to imagine a day when it might be possible to work from home, free from oversight and more in control of their work day. Today, working from home is becoming so common that the idea of making every employee come into the office five days a week seems almost tyrannical.
NEWS
January 29, 1985 | United Press International
Pope John Paul II, celebrating an outdoor Mass in a Venezuelan boom town, delivered an outspoken defense of Third World workers' rights today and warned of a "frightening imbalance" between rich and poor. The pontiff told factory workers and their families in Venezuela's iron and steel capital that society's idea of economic progress must be changed to ensure human dignity. Authorities had expected a crowd of about 500,000 people at the Mass but the turnout was considerably smaller.
NEWS
September 13, 1985 | Associated Press
Five factory workers died after being exposed to the hot vapors of burning waste at a chemical plant in Slovakia, the Slovak Communist Party daily Pravda reported. A sixth worker was reported in critical condition in a hospital at Kosice. Pravda said the accident was caused by the malfunctioning pressure valve of a boiler. The men were burning used overalls of fellow workers at the Chemko Stazske factory when they were hit by an outburst of vapor and waste products. They suffered serious burns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1985 | Associated Press
Five factory workers died after being exposed to the hot vapors of burning waste at a chemical plant in Slovakia, the Slovak Communist Party daily Pravda reported. A sixth worker was reported in critical condition in a hospital at Kosice. Pravda said the accident was caused by the malfunctioning pressure valve of a boiler. The men were burning used overalls of fellow workers at the Chemko Stazske factory when they were hit by an outburst of vapor and waste products. They suffered serious burns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1992
The NAFTA is just another example of Uncle knows best and the Them vs. Us mentality of our government. The horse has long ago left the barn. The export of American jobs has been going on for years. All the NAFTA proposes is to help Canada and Mexico better compete with the Far East and to carve that help in stone. If we added to the balance of trade the value of the jobs already exported to the rest of the world, we would have an incredible trade surplus. For our government to assist in the further theft, pillage and rape of the American worker is treachery.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1986 | KRISTINE McKENNA
"ALBUM." Public Image Ltd. Elektra. On the evidence of this album, John Lydon has resigned himself to the fact that there's no getting around the traditional musical vocabulary; much as he professed to despise it, he was simply incapable of inventing a new one. Featuring a cast of slick hired guns, this is Lydon's most musical album to date.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Meow! "Saturday Night Live" has taken on the tech bloggers who complained about the iPhone 5, and it isn't pretty. If you've ever complained publicly about Apple's latest smartphone, you may wish you hadn't. The skit offers some perspective on opinionated tech bloggers by introducing them to the people who actually made the phones they are complaining about: Peasant laborers in a Chinese factory. It begins with host Christina Applegate in a blue suit and brown wig hosting a show called "Tech Talk.
BUSINESS
January 19, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The banners were hung throughout Nissan's sprawling assembly plant here, urging workers to attain a goal that many did not even understand at first: "First in Rogers!" the banners said in Japanese. The hidden meaning behind that slogan: All Nissan workers must join as a team to build the best cars in the world.
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