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BUSINESS
October 15, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
Meow! "Saturday Night Live" has taken on the tech bloggers who complained about the iPhone 5, and it isn't pretty. If you've ever complained publicly about Apple's latest smartphone, you may wish you hadn't. The skit offers some perspective on opinionated tech bloggers by introducing them to the people who actually made the phones they are complaining about: Peasant laborers in a Chinese factory. It begins with host Christina Applegate in a blue suit and brown wig hosting a show called "Tech Talk.
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BUSINESS
January 19, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The banners were hung throughout Nissan's sprawling assembly plant here, urging workers to attain a goal that many did not even understand at first: "First in Rogers!" the banners said in Japanese. The hidden meaning behind that slogan: All Nissan workers must join as a team to build the best cars in the world.
NEWS
September 30, 1986 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
A new wage system to give factory workers greater incentives to produce more goods has been adopted and will take effect Jan. 1, a Soviet official has announced. If it works as outlined in the government newspaper Izvestia, there will be no ceiling on the pay of industrial workers who turn in the best performances on the job. Under the plan, if a worker produces twice as much, he would receive double his usual salary. There is an important condition, however.
NEWS
March 8, 1985 | United Press International
The nation's unemployment rate dropped a notch to 7.3% in February from 7.4% in January as women and teen-agers found more jobs in the service industries, the government said today. But factory workers--particularly those in auto plants--suffered major setbacks, as did black workers. (Unemployment in the Los Angeles-Orange County area fell sharply, to 6.7% from January's 8%, for the lowest rate since August, 1981. In California, the rate also fell to 6.7% from 7.3% the month before.) Of the 115.
BUSINESS
May 7, 2008 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
U.S. manufacturers who provide health insurance spend an average of $2.38 per worker per hour on healthcare -- more than twice as much as their foreign competitors, an analysis released Tuesday found. The study provides support for the now-familiar lament of employers -- that rising healthcare costs are eating into the corporate bottom line. American automakers say employee health coverage adds $1,500 to the price of each car, and many U.S.
NEWS
February 20, 2000 | STANLEY HOLMES and JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The McDonnell Douglas aircraft factory in Long Beach was being assailed for lax quality control and inferior workmanship when it built the Alaska Airlines MD-83 jetliner that recently crashed in the Pacific Ocean, according to documents and interviews.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1998 | BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allergan Inc. said Tuesday that it will cut 550 jobs, or 8.9% of its work force, and shut five of its 12 factories in an effort to slash costs and boost profit. The Irvine-based manufacturer of eye-care and skin-care products and drugs said it will lay off 110 employees at its corporate headquarters and close a factory on the 28-acre site near the John Wayne Airport. About 75 local corporate employees and 35 factory workers will lose their jobs over the next three years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1997 | MEDEA BENJAMIN, Medea Benjamin is director of Global Exchange, a San Francisco-based human rights group that has been investigating sweatshops at home and abroad
With much fanfare at a Rose Garden ceremony, President Clinton announced that a coalition of industry, human rights and labor groups had reached a breakthrough agreement to end sweatshops. Saying that the lives of factory workers are as important as the fabric they make, President Clinton called the agreement a historic step that will "give American consumers greater confidence in the products they buy."
WORLD
July 9, 2006 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
In his classic 1936 film, "Modern Times," Charlie Chaplin has to work so fast tightening bolts in a steel factory that he finally goes crazy. In a memorable scene that has become a metaphor for labor exploitation, the Little Tramp is run through the factory's enormous gears. For President Hugo Chavez's socialist government, the film is more than just entertainment: It's become a teaching tool.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
The Immigration and Naturalization Service cannot enter workplaces to look for illegal aliens without a search warrant or the employer's permission, a U.S. district judge in San Jose has ruled. Judge Robert Aguilar's decision Friday came in response to a class-action suit filed in August, 1982, against the immigration service after California factories were raided as part of a nationwide operation called "Project Jobs."
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