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Factory Workers

NEWS
January 30, 1985 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Pope John Paul II on Tuesday challenged what he called the disproportionate rewards going to capitalist managers, as opposed to those going to workers. The Pope issued the challenge during a Mass in Venezuela's most progressive industrial town before he crossed the South American continent from the Atlantic to the Pacific to begin the second leg of his current pilgrimage in Ecuador.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1995
I read, with great interest, Jeremy Rifkin's article, "What's a Worker Worth in a Workless World?" (Commentary, Oct. 11). As a business strategy consultant who has spent the last 15 years advising corporate clients on adaptations to technology, I very much agree with Rifkin. Largely because of technology, we are quickly becoming a nation of haves and have-nots. The haves possess the information, knowledge and education to deal with technology. They're advancing. The have-nots lack the information, knowledge and education to deal with technology.
NEWS
July 12, 2000
Regarding "Cruise, They Said," by Lynn O'Dell (June 21): I read the article about cruising and car clubs with great interest, and when finished, I was left with a nagging question: I wondered how you had managed to talk about street rods, Miatas and other neat vehicles and the clubs associated with them, and neglected to even mention the car that started the whole thing. In 1953 a phenomenon began that today includes hundreds of clubs and thousands of members with national and international affiliations.
WORLD
May 1, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Reeling from the deadly collapse of a building packed with thousands of factory workers, Bangladeshi laborers rallied Wednesday, marking May Day with renewed calls for workplace safety. The death toll steadily swelled in the aftermath of the disaster last week and continued to grow Wednesday as more bodies were pulled from the rubble, reaching 412 people killed in the collapse, according to theĀ  Bangladesh Sangbad Sangstha national news agency. Outrage over the disaster spilled into May Day, an annual holiday meant to champion the rights of workers worldwide.
OPINION
March 3, 2013 | By Nikil Saval
When the first modern office buildings sprung up in America at the end of the 19th century, it was an unquestioned expectation that employees would show up for work there every day. Like the factory workers who came before them, office workers usually clocked in and out, and they sat at their desks - most arranged in highly regimented rows - from morning until early evening, under constant supervision. Even trips to the water cooler were often monitored. With the development of computers and more advanced telecommunications in the 1970s, some employees began to imagine a day when it might be possible to work from home, free from oversight and more in control of their work day. Today, working from home is becoming so common that the idea of making every employee come into the office five days a week seems almost tyrannical.
NEWS
August 21, 1986 | DEBORAH CHRISTENSEN
They may have bigger cars, larger apartments or new VCRs but, a year after winning a share of a $41-million jackpot, 19 of 21 factory workers are still working on an assembly line. "We're not poor, but we're not millionaires," said Kevin Fleming. The men, from 14 countries, had pooled their money and wound up with one of three winning tickets in the Aug. 21, 1985, New York state lottery drawing, which had a jackpot of $41 million to be paid out over 20 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1993 | DAVID FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County Supervisor Gloria Molina plans to introduce a resolution next week asking that officials consider restoring an industrial health program that critics say would benefit Latinos and others who toil in factories countywide, Molina's spokesman said Friday. Responding to a Times report on Latino factory workers, Molina "found it deplorable that government has turned its back on workers under the guise of budgetary constraints," spokesman Robert Alaniz said. Los Angeles County had an industrial health unit but dismantled it amid budget concerns more than 10 years ago--in apparent violation of state law, The Times found.
BUSINESS
June 23, 1997 | JAY HANCOCK, BALTIMORE SUN
FMC Corp.'s farm-chemical business is humming. The result is that Allen Bailey worked all but four days between November and June--including weekends, including Christmas, including the first anniversary of his wedding to Sharon Bailey. Sixty-hour, seven-day workweeks are standard for the chemical technician. At least twice a month he works 16 hours straight.
NEWS
September 5, 1993 | DAVID FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While work-related fatalities throughout California and the United States have declined dramatically over the last century, death on the job has remained a fact of life. Nearly 10,000 workers were killed in 1991, according to the most recent figures available from the National Safety Council. Factory workers accounted for an estimated 800 of those deaths. In Los Angeles County in 1992, at least 10 people died in manufacturing-related accidents, including eight Latinos, coroner's records show.
WORLD
July 9, 2006 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
In his classic 1936 film, "Modern Times," Charlie Chaplin has to work so fast tightening bolts in a steel factory that he finally goes crazy. In a memorable scene that has become a metaphor for labor exploitation, the Little Tramp is run through the factory's enormous gears. For President Hugo Chavez's socialist government, the film is more than just entertainment: It's become a teaching tool.
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