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Fair Housing

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NEWS
August 14, 1986
The City Council Monday night approved the allocation of $10,000 in federal Community Development Block Grant funds for a program to inform residents about housing discrimination. The program, which may be printed or turned into a video for the city's public cable television station, will also include information on home, apartment and commercial rehabilitation loans, said Robert Berry, housing coordinator. The city also set aside $15,000 for a city-operated fair housing service.
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BUSINESS
November 28, 2013 | By Martin Eichner
Question: I own a second house where my son lives while he attends college during the school year. During summer breaks, he usually goes to live someplace else for an internship or he travels, so I like to rent out rooms in the house to teachers who are in town for continuing education classes. Generally the teachers stay anywhere from a week to the whole summer. I don't know much about being a landlord. Would any fair housing laws apply to these summer rental arrangements? Answer: Fair housing protections exist under both federal and state law. The scope of protection differs between the two. Both statutes cover "dwellings," but under the federal statute, a dwelling is exempted from the fair housing laws if a homeowner-landlord is renting a single-family house and owns three or fewer single-family houses, or if a homeowner is renting out a dwelling room or unit that contains living quarters, and he/she lives at the site and shares these living quarters with the tenant.
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REAL ESTATE
November 10, 2002
The Los Angeles County Community Development Commission will conduct five community meetings to receive comments from the public on fair housing issues. The meetings will be Thursday, 5:30-7:30 p.m., A.C. Bilbrew Library Meeting Room, 150 E. El Segundo Blvd., L.A.; Nov. 18, 6-8 p.m., South Whittier Resource Center Community Hall, 10750 Laurel Ave., Whittier; Nov. 20, 6-8 p.m., East Los Angeles Services Center, Room 109, 133 N. Sunol Drive, L.A.; Nov. 21, 6-8 p.m.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2013 | By Martin Eichner
Question: I am the manager of an apartment community. The community's owner is planning to construct a playground in the central courtyard next month. I am concerned about preventing the children from being hurt when they use this new facility. I would like to put up safety signs preventing very young children from using the playground and requiring that older children be supervised when playing there. I know there are fair housing laws preventing discrimination against families with children, so I want to be sure the signs don't violate those laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1988
In 1968, after much debate and a six-week filibuster, Congress passed the Fair Housing Act to prohibit discrimination in the sale or rental of housing based on race, color, religion, national origin or sex. Twenty years later the Senate has overwhelmingly passed a bill to broaden the protections and toughen the enforcement provisions. Both provisions are welcome and necessary.
REAL ESTATE
May 5, 1996
An Inland Empire home builder, JM Development, has received the third annual Los Angeles Times Fair Housing Award in recognition of the inclusiveness of its advertising campaign for several of its new-home communities. The ad, created by Light & Associates, featured four children of different racial backgrounds against the backdrop of an American flag.
REAL ESTATE
April 22, 2001 | Inman News Features
April is Fair Housing Month, and real estate salespeople across the country are working in their communities to help increase awareness about the importance of ensuring fair housing opportunities for everyone, according to the National Assn. of Realtors. This year marks the 33rd anniversary of the enactment of the Fair Housing Law, Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, aimed at eliminating housing discrimination.
REAL ESTATE
March 4, 2001
The Fair Housing Council of Orange County and the Apartment Assn. of Orange County will present "Successful Fair Housing and Management Tools," a one-day seminar for property owners, managers, leasing agents and marketing managers. Location: The Robert Mondavi Wine & Food Center, 1570 Scenic Ave., Costa Mesa. Time: 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cost: $75, including lunch, for members; $90 for nonmembers. Information: The Fair Housing Council of Orange County, (714) 569-0825; the Apartment Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1992 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN
Fair housing issues, including discrimination in real estate sales and landlord-tenant disputes, will be discussed Thursday during a free forum in the Simi Valley City Council Chambers, 2929 Tapo Canyon Road. The event, from 7 to 9 p.m., was arranged by the city and the Simi Valley-Moorpark Assn. of Realtors. Organizers said the program is aimed at real estate professionals, apartment owners and managers, and the general public.
REAL ESTATE
April 4, 1999 | From PROJECT SENTINEL
Question: Since I moved into my apartment, the manager of the complex has approached me on several occasions and made comments of a sexual nature, insinuating that my rent could be reduced if I went along with his advances. I really like this apartment and want to keep it. What can I do? Answer: Contact the owner of the property and notify him or her that the manager may be committing an act of discrimination under fair housing laws.
OPINION
July 18, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The federal Fair Housing Act was passed 45 years ago, just one week after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. Initially the law prohibited discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin or religion. Over the decades, it has been amended to include protection from discrimination on the basis of gender or disability or whether there are children in the household. Now it's time to amend the law again to prohibit bias based on sexual orientation and gender identity. Currently, the law does not set aside as a protected class people who are gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgendered.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2013 | By Martin Eichner
Question: I have lived in my current apartment building for three years with no problems, but recently a new manager took over. I originally came to the U.S. on a work visa; I was born and raised in China and speak Cantonese as my first language. As a result, I speak with a heavy accent. I am also much more comfortable with written English than with speaking English. About a month ago, I got a notice of a rent increase from the new manager, which surprised me because I had just gotten a rent increase a few months earlier.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2013 | By Martin Eichner
Question: I am a first-time landlord who just bought a six-unit apartment building as a personal investment. My Christian faith is extremely important to me and affects every aspect of my life. I would prefer to rent out the apartments in my building to other Christians, not because I am prejudiced against non-Christians but because I like the idea of creating a community of believers living together in fellowship. I have been told that the fair housing laws do not allow me to specify in my advertising that I will accept only Christian tenants.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2012 | By Martin Eichner
Question: Last month, a young couple moved into the apartment next to mine. When I met them, I learned they had recently moved here from another country for a job opportunity. I thought I would be neighborly and invited them over for a home-cooked meal while they were in the process of getting settled in. A week or so later, they invited me to dinner at their apartment. I had never eaten their culture's food before, and although I enjoyed some of the dishes, I couldn't help but notice the very pungent smell that came from their cooking.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2012 | By Martin Eichner
Question: I started drinking alcohol and using drugs when I was in high school, and I kept it up until recently. I didn't think I had a problem because I have maintained good grades in school and held a steady job. Last year, I was stopped by the police for driving under the influence. When the police searched my car, they found a pipe and a backpack with crack cocaine. I pleaded guilty to felony drug possession. As part of my sentence, I completed a government-mandated drug rehabilitation program, and I have been clean since then.
OPINION
May 24, 2012 | By Jonathan Hunter and Autumn M. Elliott
Los Angeles has made slow but significant progress toward ending homelessness, but the City Council is about to vote on a proposed law that could stop that momentum in its tracks. The Community Care Facilities Ordinance would threaten the well-being of thousands of people with disabilities, create a nightmare for property owners, cost taxpayers more, violate principles of fair housing and jeopardize access to federal funds. The proposed ordinance grew out of an effort to eliminate sober-living homes in residential neighborhoods.
REAL ESTATE
December 8, 1996 | KENNETH R. HARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Clinton administration is wrestling with an explosive issue that threatens to redefine what real estate agents can--and cannot--tell prospective home buyers about the racial and ethnic characteristics of neighborhoods. Since the passage of the Fair Housing Act in 1968, realty agents nationwide have been trained to avoid discussions of racial or other features of neighborhoods that may be covered by the law's anti-bias protections.
NEWS
August 2, 1988 | United Press International
The Senate approved a landmark housing bill today putting teeth in federal housing laws and giving families and the handicapped protections for the first time in a move to end a pervasive form of discrimination. Approved on a 94-3 vote, the measure is similar to one adopted 376 to 23 by the House in late June. A conference committee must resolve minor differences before the measure goes to President Reagan, who has said he is eager to sign it. Sens. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) Gordon J. Humphrey (R-N.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2012 | By Martin Eichner
Question: I am a manager for a company that provides property management for several rental communities. We have a limited pet policy in all our properties. Residents can have pets only if we approve the specific animal. We have this policy so that animals unsuited for an apartment community, because they are too large or too noisy, can be excluded. A resident in one of our properties gave us a note from his doctor stating that he needed a service animal to help with his disability.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2011 | By Martin Eichner
Question: I live alone in an upper-level apartment. I was recently diagnosed with cancer and began chemotherapy treatments. The side effects of the treatment include dizziness and exhaustion. My physician has suggested that I try to minimize my exposure to situations that may result in injury from the side effects. He also suggested that I move to a ground-floor unit to make things easier. One the same size as mine is available, so I asked my manager if I could transfer. The manager told me she would not allow me to transfer since my lease has three more months to go. I thought because of my disability status and condition, I could request this type of transfer.
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