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OPINION
June 24, 2011 | By Harold Meyerson
Nearly every day for three years, Josue Melquisedec Diaz reported to work by going to a New Orleans street corner where contractors, subcontractors and people fixing up their places went to hire day laborers. It was there, one day in 2008, that a contractor picked him up and took him to Beaumont, Texas, just across the Louisiana line, to work on the cleanup, demolition and reconstruction projects that Beaumont was undertaking in the wake of Hurricane Gustav. Diaz was put to work in a residential neighborhood that had been flooded.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 16, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Last week President Obama ordered the Department of Labor to revise regulations determining which workers qualify for federal overtime protections, a move that was presented as a way to increase income for some lower-wage workers. It's not. In reality, it's a matter of basic fairness. The issue begins with the federal Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, which established the national minimum wage for most workers and guaranteed overtime pay for more than 40 hours of work a week. But the law also allowed overtime exemptions to be set by the Labor Department.
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NEWS
October 24, 1985
The House Education and Labor Committee approved a bill to nullify a Supreme Court decision requiring state and local governments to pay overtime to employees working more than 40 hours a week. By unanimous vote, the panel approved the measure to amend the federal Fair Labor Standards Act and sent it to the full House. A nearly identical bill is awaiting action in the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee, where quick passage is expected. The Supreme Court ruled last Feb.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
The Labor Department on Tuesday announced a new rule that would extend minimum wage and overtime protections to nearly 2 million direct care workers. The new rule would apply to workers such as home health aides, personal care aides and certified nursing assistants, and will take effect Jan. 1, 2015.  These workers would now be covered under the Fair Labor Standards Act. Previously, these positions were exempt because they fell under the "companionship services" category, which includes baby-sitters.  Most dangerous jobs: 10 professions with the highest fatalities in America But labor officials and the Obama administration said these types of jobs have become increasingly professionalized.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2002
The City Council agreed to pay $6.7 million Wednesday to settle a lawsuit that accused the Los Angeles Police Department of failing to pay overtime. The settlement, approved on a 9-1 vote in closed session, will go to more than 500 officers who claimed the LAPD violated the federal Fair Labor Standards Act by not paying overtime. Payments for some officers may reach six digits, depending upon how much overtime they worked, plaintiffs attorney Gregory Petersen said.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
The Labor Department on Tuesday announced a new rule that would extend minimum wage and overtime protections to nearly 2 million direct care workers. The new rule would apply to workers such as home health aides, personal care aides and certified nursing assistants, and will take effect Jan. 1, 2015.  These workers would now be covered under the Fair Labor Standards Act. Previously, these positions were exempt because they fell under the "companionship services" category, which includes baby-sitters.  Most dangerous jobs: 10 professions with the highest fatalities in America But labor officials and the Obama administration said these types of jobs have become increasingly professionalized.
OPINION
March 16, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Last week President Obama ordered the Department of Labor to revise regulations determining which workers qualify for federal overtime protections, a move that was presented as a way to increase income for some lower-wage workers. It's not. In reality, it's a matter of basic fairness. The issue begins with the federal Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, which established the national minimum wage for most workers and guaranteed overtime pay for more than 40 hours of work a week. But the law also allowed overtime exemptions to be set by the Labor Department.
OPINION
August 2, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
In the next two decades about 78 million baby boomers in the U.S. will turn 65. As they age, a portion of them will be cared for by their families, and others will no doubt enter facilities for the elderly. But many will rely on a growing cadre of domestic in-home workers. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the demand for the kind of personal-care aides who can help cook, clean and bathe the elderly and disabled is expected to grow by 70% from 2010 to 2020. Today, these caregivers often labor in conditions that would not be tolerated in any other industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Fox Searchlight Pictures has lost a key ruling in its long-running legal fight with former interns who worked on 2010's "Black Swan" and other movie productions. U.S. District Judge William Pauley issued a summary judgment on Tuesday in New York, saying Fox Searchlight violated minimum wage laws by not paying interns. The judge also certified a class action for interns who worked for Fox Entertainment Group, the parent of Fox Searchlight. The matter stems from a September 2011 lawsuit filed by former interns Eric Glatt and Andrew Footman, who alleged they performed menial tasks -- such as retrieving lunch for other workers -- that should have been assigned to paid employees of Fox Searchlight.
NEWS
March 27, 1997 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Putting the White House in a difficult political bind, a coalition of state and local human services agencies on Wednesday urged the Clinton administration to waive provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act--including the minimum wage--for welfare recipients placed in community service jobs. A resolution passed Wednesday by the American Public Welfare Assn. marks a significant escalation of pressure on the administration to rule on a central question of welfare reform.
OPINION
August 2, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
In the next two decades about 78 million baby boomers in the U.S. will turn 65. As they age, a portion of them will be cared for by their families, and others will no doubt enter facilities for the elderly. But many will rely on a growing cadre of domestic in-home workers. According to the U.S. Department of Labor, the demand for the kind of personal-care aides who can help cook, clean and bathe the elderly and disabled is expected to grow by 70% from 2010 to 2020. Today, these caregivers often labor in conditions that would not be tolerated in any other industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2013 | By Daniel Miller
Fox Searchlight Pictures has lost a key ruling in its long-running legal fight with former interns who worked on 2010's "Black Swan" and other movie productions. U.S. District Judge William Pauley issued a summary judgment on Tuesday in New York, saying Fox Searchlight violated minimum wage laws by not paying interns. The judge also certified a class action for interns who worked for Fox Entertainment Group, the parent of Fox Searchlight. The matter stems from a September 2011 lawsuit filed by former interns Eric Glatt and Andrew Footman, who alleged they performed menial tasks -- such as retrieving lunch for other workers -- that should have been assigned to paid employees of Fox Searchlight.
OPINION
November 1, 2012 | By Donald Cohen
The U.S. economy has turned a corner. The national unemployment rate hit a post-recession low of 7.8% in September. Rising consumer confidence, increasing home prices and other leading economic indicators confirm the trend. Unemployment is still too high, but a focus on the number of jobs obscures a serious long-term crisis of declining wages and a shrinking middle class that is having a harder and harder time making ends meet. New jobs pay less, raises are rare and benefits even rarer.
OPINION
June 24, 2011 | By Harold Meyerson
Nearly every day for three years, Josue Melquisedec Diaz reported to work by going to a New Orleans street corner where contractors, subcontractors and people fixing up their places went to hire day laborers. It was there, one day in 2008, that a contractor picked him up and took him to Beaumont, Texas, just across the Louisiana line, to work on the cleanup, demolition and reconstruction projects that Beaumont was undertaking in the wake of Hurricane Gustav. Diaz was put to work in a residential neighborhood that had been flooded.
OPINION
August 3, 2010 | By Harold Meyerson
It's not really news when a bill fails to become a law in Sacramento. In this age of partisan gridlock, plenty of good ideas are never enacted. Still, one bill that made it to Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's desk last week, only to be killed by his veto, is worth looking at for what it tells us about how hard it is to clean out even antiquated moral rot, so long as powerful interests profit from it. The bill, written by San Joaquin Valley Democratic...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2002
The City Council agreed to pay $6.7 million Wednesday to settle a lawsuit that accused the Los Angeles Police Department of failing to pay overtime. The settlement, approved on a 9-1 vote in closed session, will go to more than 500 officers who claimed the LAPD violated the federal Fair Labor Standards Act by not paying overtime. Payments for some officers may reach six digits, depending upon how much overtime they worked, plaintiffs attorney Gregory Petersen said.
OPINION
November 1, 2012 | By Donald Cohen
The U.S. economy has turned a corner. The national unemployment rate hit a post-recession low of 7.8% in September. Rising consumer confidence, increasing home prices and other leading economic indicators confirm the trend. Unemployment is still too high, but a focus on the number of jobs obscures a serious long-term crisis of declining wages and a shrinking middle class that is having a harder and harder time making ends meet. New jobs pay less, raises are rare and benefits even rarer.
OPINION
August 3, 2010 | By Harold Meyerson
It's not really news when a bill fails to become a law in Sacramento. In this age of partisan gridlock, plenty of good ideas are never enacted. Still, one bill that made it to Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's desk last week, only to be killed by his veto, is worth looking at for what it tells us about how hard it is to clean out even antiquated moral rot, so long as powerful interests profit from it. The bill, written by San Joaquin Valley Democratic...
NEWS
March 27, 1997 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Putting the White House in a difficult political bind, a coalition of state and local human services agencies on Wednesday urged the Clinton administration to waive provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act--including the minimum wage--for welfare recipients placed in community service jobs. A resolution passed Wednesday by the American Public Welfare Assn. marks a significant escalation of pressure on the administration to rule on a central question of welfare reform.
NEWS
October 24, 1985
The House Education and Labor Committee approved a bill to nullify a Supreme Court decision requiring state and local governments to pay overtime to employees working more than 40 hours a week. By unanimous vote, the panel approved the measure to amend the federal Fair Labor Standards Act and sent it to the full House. A nearly identical bill is awaiting action in the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee, where quick passage is expected. The Supreme Court ruled last Feb.
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