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BUSINESS
April 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
Trade practices in Japan, the European Union, South Korea and China harm U.S. companies, the Clinton administration said Tuesday in its annual report on foreign trade barriers. These four led 49 countries and three trading groups put on notice that they had erected unfair trade barriers, were failing to adequately protect U.S. copyrights and patents or were otherwise engaging in trade practices that the administration considers unfair.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1996
What another glorious party it was when the United Nations celebrated its 50th birthday last October, this from an organization that whatever its shortcomings knows how to lay out an elegant spread. The New York bash was sufficient to resurrect, if but for a few days, that shining aura that once curled round the world body much as the olive branches embrace the world on the U.N. flag. Turning 50, you need a boost like that. Six months later, the U.N.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1995
It seems odd to me, somehow, that KLSX is giving up the ghost and turning itself over to the very thing that killed it as a music station ("KLSX [With Kato] Joins Talk Radio Wars Today," Calendar, Aug. 1). 97.1's decline can be traced back to the moment it surrendered its morning drive time to New York City's No. 1 form of air pollution: Howard Stern. I don't doubt that this ultimately chased away KLSX's core audience, and only attracted the kind of people who actually find Stern funny, which isn't a demographic that I would particularly covet.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reflecting an increasingly hardball approach by U.S. firms in Japan, financial information company Bloomberg filed an unfair-trade complaint Wednesday against telecommunications giant Nippon Telegraph & Telephone Corp. In documents filed with Japan's Fair Trade Commission, Bloomberg charged that a proposed 83% price hike for local digital telephone service "constitutes an unfair competitive practice" that will hurt its business--which has been rapidly expanding--and help an NTT subsidiary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1995
Once again, the United States and China find themselves on the brink of a trade war. Because Beijing failed to make the U.S. deadline to crack down on rampant counterfeiting of a wide range of American products, Washington, rightly, is imposing punitive tariffs on a broad range of Chinese exports adding up to $1 billion. And Beijing is threatening to retaliate. Caught in the cross fire is the very future of the U.S.-Chinese relationship. There is plenty of time to avoid a calamity.
OPINION
November 27, 1994
Re "Trade Deficit Grows, Dealing Setback to GATT," Nov. 19: The opponents of GATT would have us believe that the solution to our large trade deficit and the loss of manufacturing jobs to other countries is to block changes in existing world trade policy. The only logical interpretation of their arguments is that they really want jobs to move overseas and really want the United States to maintain a large trade deficit. While GATT does have problems, it will have a much smaller impact on U.S. imports than on U.S. exports, since most U.S. tariffs are already low. KEITH PRICE Los Angeles Last month's $10 billion trade deficit brings to our attention once again the disastrous course being followed by the U.S. in allowing this condition to continue year after year.
BUSINESS
October 21, 1994 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One day in late June, options trader Steven I. Malitz was poised to buy 1,200 shares of American Colloid stock at $13 a share--a quarter of a point more than any of the Nasdaq-listed stock's market makers were offering to pay. Small investors certainly would have done better to sell to Malitz at his price. But they never got the chance. Instead, market makers ignored Malitz's order--"traded through" it, in market parlance--and continued to sell at $12.
NEWS
October 20, 1994 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the morning sun lifts above the hills east of this town near the Hudson River, Harvey Houtkin, principal and chief executive officer of tiny Domestic Securities Inc., sits before a Nasdaq trading terminal, steeling himself to do the unthinkable. Houtkin taps a few buttons on a keyboard linked to the central computer for over-the-counter stock trading. "What I'm doing now is the most unacceptable thing you can do in the market," he says.
NEWS
February 17, 1994 | CHRIS WOODYARD and DEAN TAKAHASHI and JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When trade relations between Japan and the United States get chilly, an icy breeze blows through Orange County. Japan is Orange County's largest export destination, taking about $1 billion in computers, medicines and other goods produced locally every year. And Orange County is the home of U.S. headquarters for Japanese companies like Mazda, Mitsubishi, Kawasaki and Ricoh, which provide thousands of jobs locally. So it hit home Wednesday after U.S.
NEWS
February 17, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY and PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Hiroshi Soma, a professional jewelry appraiser with an avid interest in cars, had never remotely considered buying an automobile made in America. "It's legendary that they break down very easily," Soma said, ticking off a list of other common fears: low resale value, inability to get good service, lack of available dealerships. Lately, though he has yet to buy an American car, Soma has started to change his mind. "They are getting better every year," he said.
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