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Fairchild Semiconductor

BUSINESS
October 1, 1987 | DONNA K.H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
The federal government on Wednesday gave the go-ahead for National Semiconductor's purchase of Fairchild Semiconductor, paving the way for the creation of the world's sixth-largest computer chip company. The Justice Department and Federal Trade Commission notified Santa Clara-based National that they had completed their inquiries into antitrust issues and were taking no action to block the transaction.
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BUSINESS
April 22, 1987 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
Two of Fairchild Semiconductor's overseas manufacturing plants are up for sale, amid efforts by Fairchild's parent, Schlumberger Ltd., to get out from under the heavy burden of the semiconductor business. Fairchild itself is up for sale. Since a plan for Japanese chip maker Fujitsu to buy Cupertino, Calif.-based Fairchild collapsed last month, Schlumberger has considered options including a management-backed buyout for the subsidiary.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1987 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
National Semiconductor, whose outspoken president left Fairchild Semiconductor two decades ago, agreed on Monday to buy the struggling Silicon Valley pioneer for $122 million. The price, described by several analysts and competitors as "a steal," is about half of what Japan's Fujitsu Ltd. was prepared to pay Schlumberger Ltd. for its Fairchild unit earlier this year. Fujitsu's deal to acquire an 80% stake in Fairchild collapsed amid opposition from the U.S.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1987 | BILL RITTER, San Diego County Business Editor
A San Diego high-tech firm said Sunday it is willing to buy the defense-related operations of Fairchild Semiconductor if the federal government decides the pending sale of those businesses to a Japanese firm endangers national security. Applied Micro Circuits would be an "alternative" buyer of the Fairchild units now proposed to be sold to the microelectronics subsidiary of Japan-based Fujitsu Ltd., according to Roger Smullen, Applied Micro Circuits chairman and chief executive.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1990
The article, "Loral to Sell 49% Stake in Ford Division" (Oct. 23), described plans by Loral to sell the satellite division of Ford Aerospace to three European firms to create one of the world's largest commercial satellite businesses. I consider a satellite company a strategic industry that is important to the national security of the United States. As such, I waited for expressions of opposition from members of Congress and media columnists. I have waited for a week and haven't heard any opposition whatsoever from any source.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1985 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
Schlumberger, the oil-field services giant that bought Fairchild Semiconductor in 1979, announced Thursday a $485-million write-down for the current quarter stemming from its unprofitable Fairchild unit. The charge against earnings probably will give Schlumberger a net loss of about $270 million in its fourth quarter, analysts said. But most of the write-down reflects plant closings already made and accounting adjustments resulting from Fairchild's financial problems.
BUSINESS
October 24, 1986 | From Reuters
The Schlumberger oil services company said Thursday that it would spin off its money-losing Fairchild Semiconductor subsidiary into a new joint venture with Fujitsu of Japan. Under the agreement, Fujitsu will take 80% of the new company, with Schlumberger retaining 20%. No cash will change hands because of the new venture, although Schlumberger said it would result in a $200-million charge against fourth-quarter earnings.
BUSINESS
August 14, 1987 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
Fujitsu Ltd. has withdrawn its financial support for a management-led buyout of Fairchild Semiconductor, sources said Thursday, increasing the likelihood that Fairchild will be sold to another buyer. Analysts said companies interested in buying all or part of Fairchild, a unit of Schlumberger Ltd., include Intergraph, a Huntsville, Ala., maker of computer workstations, and rival chip makers Motorola of Schaumberg, Ill., and Santa Clara-based National Semiconductor.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1986 | From Reuters
Schlumberger Ltd., a leading oil services firm that last week ousted its chairman, is likely to sell off its Fairchild Semiconductor division, industry analysts said today. Schlumberger bought Fairchild in 1978 for $425 million, and the manufacturer of microchips has lost money almost every year since. Fairchild, based in Mountain View, Calif., is the nation's second-oldest semiconductor manufacturer behind Texas Instruments. Schlumberger is now run by D.
BUSINESS
March 19, 1987 | DONNA K.H. WALTERS, Times Staff Writer
The chief executive of Fairchild Semiconductor lashed out at his competitors Wednesday, accusing them of kindling "the fires of opposition" that led to the collapse of Fujitsu Ltd.'s plan to buy control of his company. Fairchild's Donald W. Brooks also said he expects industry leaders to oppose a new plan for the Japanese electronics giant and the Cupertino, Calif.-based chip maker to share technology and manufacturing instead of merging.
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