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Faith Popcorn

NEWS
May 4, 2000 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At Environmental Graphics in Hopkins, Minn., they take the notion of "cocooning" seriously. "It's more important all the time," says Todd Imholte, vice president of sales. "[Futurist] Faith Popcorn said cocooning would be the trend of the millennium, as people sought refuge in their homes from the stresses of the outside world." Environmental Graphics, a small firm that has been producing unusual wall murals for almost 30 years, has jumped on the bandwagon by creating designs intended to soothe.
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FOOD
January 25, 1996 | BEV BENNETT
Call it backlash, a craving for flavor or laziness; whatever the excuse, people are lusting after fat again. New York-based Faith Popcorn calls this phenomenon "pleasure revenge." Popcorn, who heads BrainReserve Inc., helps major companies market their products based on consumer trends. Popcorn noted that people are tired of being scolded for their fat intake and "want to cut loose again." What that means is it isn't necessary to justify a recipe for chicken livers in cream sauce. It is rich.
FOOD
January 26, 1995 | CHARLES PERRY
Food and Wines From France offers a free 32-page guide to French, well, foods (cheeses and hams) and wines. The wine section of "It's a Great Time to Be French" emphasizes finding the right French wine to serve with non-French cuisines such as Chinese, Italian and Cajun. (One reason must be the figures showing that nearly 80% of consumers think the French wines taste good but only just over half as many consider them easy to select.) For a guide, call (800) 522-WINE.
MAGAZINE
July 17, 1994 | CLAUDIO DECHIARA
Everyone has their moment in the sun. So now that the World Cup has arrived, maybe my time has come. At last. You see, I have a hobby. Some call it an obsession. Wherever I am, wherever I travel, I go off in search of soccer goals. I look for two poles, a crossbar, a net, a line traversing the goal mouth. Invariably I find them, for I have an instinctive sense for where in town they are hidden. Then I take out my camera, focus and shoot. I have soccer goals set in the pastoral Tuscan hills.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1986 | Associated Press
Betty Crocker, the first lady of the kitchen, has let down her hair and dropped a few years in a makeover that turns the homespun housewife into a dressed-for-success yuppie. She looks less likely to spend the day over a stove than to whip up something with a food processor and microwave after returning home from the office.
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | FRANCES HALPERN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The image of the former president of the United States in his various roles as a yeoman actor during Hollywood's golden years makes for fascinating viewing. Three films will be shown at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library this month, beginning with the 1951 "Bedtime for Bonzo," which screens at 7 p.m. Wednesday and repeats at 2 p.m. Aug. 15. Ted Berkman of Santa Barbara, who co-wrote the "Bonzo" screenplay, is still kidded about that writing assignment.
MAGAZINE
August 21, 1988 | ROBERT LAWRENCE BALZER
THE RETURN of the martini is more than a myth, more than the wishful thinking of professional barkeepers. Wherever I've inquired, I've been told that there has been as much as a 25% increase in calls for the once ubiquitous cocktail that fell from grace several years ago.
NEWS
November 18, 2001 | CHELSEA J. CARTER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Robert Zumberge can't seem to get enough cowboy coffee--a steaming concoction of hot java and dark chocolate miniatures. For Kim Almquist, it's candy. There's something comforting about certain foods, something that feels good after so much bad news that started with the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. "What's one more chocolate?" asked Almquist, 24. "It seems a little strange to be obsessing about something like that when there's so much more going on."
NEWS
June 16, 1987 | Jack Smith
I have been looking about for some way of supporting myself after retirement, and I think I will become a prognosticator of trends. There is plenty of money in it, according to a story in Newsweek about Faith Popcorn, a cheeky young New Yorker who charges corporations up to $1 million for her "packaged" predictions of consumer trends. Let's say the men's clothing industry wants to know whether men will be buying wool plaids, gabardine or silk, so they'll know which way to go.
FOOD
February 8, 1990 | PETER EDIDIN, PSYCHOLOGY TODAY
"The yuppie is dead," declares trend-spotter Faith Popcorn, chairman of BrainReserve. As we kindly and gently tiptoe into the '90s, the semi-recumbent Couch Potatoes, with their comfortable homes and stable relationships, are already replacing the young financial wizards, with their expense-account lives, as symbols of the "good life." What, we asked the professional prognosticators, does this portend for the way we will be eating and entertaining in the years ahead?
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