Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsFake Pot
IN THE NEWS

Fake Pot

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 1, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Sales and possession of Spice, Blaze and other "fake" marijuana products were outlawed for at least a year Tuesday by a federal agency that expressed concern about teens being harmed by smoking such products, according to an announcement. The Drug Enforcement Administration took aim at the products said to create a marijuana-like high. It used its emergency authority to ban five chemicals in such products: JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-200, CP-47,497 and cannabicyclohexano. "These products consist of plant material that has been coated with research chemicals that claim to mimic THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, and are sold at a variety of retail outlets, in head shops, and over the Internet," the DEA announcement says.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 3, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Spice. K2. Blaze. Red X Dawn. The names for fake pot sound less alarming than the chemicals inside such products: JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-200, CP-47,497 and cannabicyclohexanol. Those are the five chemicals on which the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration has focused its attention this week, announcing a temporary ban on ingredients used to make synthetic marijuana. Or, rather, "herbal incense," as such products are usually called. (Parents, please. Don’t fall for that.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 3, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Spice. K2. Blaze. Red X Dawn. The names for fake pot sound less alarming than the chemicals inside such products: JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-200, CP-47,497 and cannabicyclohexanol. Those are the five chemicals on which the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration has focused its attention this week, announcing a temporary ban on ingredients used to make synthetic marijuana. Or, rather, "herbal incense," as such products are usually called. (Parents, please. Don’t fall for that.
NEWS
March 1, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Sales and possession of Spice, Blaze and other "fake" marijuana products were outlawed for at least a year Tuesday by a federal agency that expressed concern about teens being harmed by smoking such products, according to an announcement. The Drug Enforcement Administration took aim at the products said to create a marijuana-like high. It used its emergency authority to ban five chemicals in such products: JWH-018, JWH-073, JWH-200, CP-47,497 and cannabicyclohexano. "These products consist of plant material that has been coated with research chemicals that claim to mimic THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, and are sold at a variety of retail outlets, in head shops, and over the Internet," the DEA announcement says.
NATIONAL
September 28, 2011 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
John W. Huffman is a bearded, elfin man, a professor of organic chemistry who runs model trains in his basement and tinkers with antique cars. At 79, he walks a bit unsteadily after a couple of nasty falls. Relaxing on his back porch in the Nantahala National Forest, watching hummingbirds flit across his rose beds, Huffman looks every bit the wise, venerable academic in repose. But this courtly scientist unwittingly contributed to the spread of "designer marijuana" so potent that the Drug Enforcement Administration has declared some of what he created illegal.
NEWS
May 17, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots Blog
HONOLULU — Synthetic marijuana, known on the street as Spice, can cause a lengthy bout of psychosis in some users, according to research presented at the American Psychiatric Assn. annual meeting. Doctors at the Naval Medical Center in San Diego reported on 10 patients who were hospitalized for psychosis after using Spice. The synthetic cannabis is also known as K2, Blaze or Red X Dawn. The drug consists of plant material coated with synthetic chemicals meant to produce a high similar to marijuana.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2006 | Adam Gorlick, The Associated Press
Joseph White's home office is like a modern-day hippie hangout. Books on Buddhism and yoga mingle with business planners and a laptop computer. An acoustic guitar rests next to a shuffle of sheet music for "Mr. Tambourine Man," just across the room from a fax machine. And then there are the marijuana stalks. Towering six-footers. Pint-size plants. He even has a few ripe buds kicking around on a desk, not far from his cellphone. His stash is for sale, but it won't get you stoned.
NATIONAL
January 28, 2012 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
When Jeffery H. Moran goes to work each day, he swipes his security badge, passes into an airtight chamber, opens a bombproof door and enters a lab full of deadly toxins. As chief of the counter-terrorism laboratory at the Arkansas Department of Health — one of 62 such federally funded labs in the country — he heads two dozen chemists who are on constant alert for the release of pestilence or poisons in the United States. Armed with $2 million worth of new equipment, Moran concocts gruesome tests to keep his team sharp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1999 | ANN W. O'NEILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't the fake pot plant in her courtroom. Or the cigarette-smoking in her chambers. Or even the aborted courtroom wedding for infamous parent killer Lyle Menendez. What really got Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Nancy Brown in trouble was kicking the bureaucrat out of her courtroom. For four years.
NEWS
April 29, 1993 | BOB SIPCHEN
No doubt what happened in Waco last week will be one of the year's Top 10 stories. Still, how many people are already bored by the whole wild, weird, sick event? Problem is, David Koresh was a wacko. Psychopaths of his ilk, with their misfiring synapses, their stupid grins and behavior that defies plot analysis, eventually just aren't interesting to people whose minds can still get a logical grip.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|