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Falcon Theatre

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2002 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Falcon Theatre in Burbank will produce its first subscription season, which will include the Los Angeles premiere of Lee Blessing's "Cobb," which played off-Broadway last year, and "Gretty Goodtime" by John Belluso, whose "Body of Bourne" was seen at the Mark Taper Forum last year. In addition, the theater has moved up the Actors' Equity scale to a regular contract with the union, producer Garry Marshall announced Friday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
April 20, 2013 | Chris Erskine
So many of life's soupy uncertainties can be settled in or near tiny Toluca Lake, a neighborhood named for a body of water we never see. Ever water-skied on Toluca Lake? Ever caught a bass there, or lay idle on the toasty summer sand? Toluca Lake. An illusion wrapped in an enigma wrapped in a giant fence. People are always asking, "Why do you go out so often now?" and I immediately describe for them the baritone bark of our 300-pound beagle, his atrocious table manners, his inability to hold down a job. Of our five kids, he is the least motivated.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2000 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With JoAnne Worley heading the cast, you may expect a good deal morethan you get in the Falcon Theatre's disappointing "updating" of "Hansel and Gretel." You do get Worley, however, and that's the show's saving grace. With comic chops as robust as ever, this "Laugh-In" luminary and consummate stage pro could make reading the phone book funny, and she manages to provide a sense of fun to Lori Marshall's lackluster, expository script and director Kevin Larkin's uninspired staging.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2012 | By F. Kathleen Foley
There's no disputing the fact that the Troubadour Theater Company, under the direction of the group's longtime artistic director, Matt Walker, is one hot ticket -- that is, if you can manage to finagle a seat to one of its sold-out performances.  Even when a show is not quite up to the mark of previous productions, as is the case with “Rudolph the Red-Nosed ReinDOORS,” at the Falcon, the Troubies are still the tree-topping stars of local holiday...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, Don Shirley is The Times' theater writer
After two years at the Falcon Theatre in Burbank, the Mark Taper Forum's annual New Work Festival is again on the move, to the Actors' Gang in Hollywood. The Falcon, busy with its first full season, was unavailable this year, said Taper producing director Robert Egan. Part of the Taper festival was at the Actors' Gang in 1994, and "the ambience of that space is conducive to a new work festival. The audience that comes to that space is interested in this kind of work," Egan said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2012 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Melanie Griffith returns to the spotlight as a young man's dysfunctional mother in "No Way Around but Through," a new play written by and starring Scott Caan, which runs through July 8 at the Falcon Theatre in Burbank. You play a very different kind of role from the sweet, girlish characters you're famous for. Your character is jaded, steely, a bit of a monster. I don't know if she's really that much of a monster. I think she's a monster in his [her son's ] mind. You know, kids that don't want to be doing what they're supposed to do, like grow up. But yeah, I guess she's a monster in a way, but I've been through stuff like that with my kids.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1999
The critically acclaimed "Anastasia Krupnik," starring Brenda Grate in the title role, concludes its run this weekend at the Falcon Theatre in Burbank. This adaptation of Lois Lowry's book, written and directed by Meryl Friedman, is the first offering of the Falcon's Children's Theater series. * "Anastasia Krupnik," Saturday at noon, Sunday at noon and 2 p.m., Falcon Theatre, 4252 Riverside Drive, Burbank. Ends Sunday. (818) 955-8101. $8.50.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2001 | ROSEMARY CLANDOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
How can a young pig find beauty inside its pen? Through opera, according to "Figaro . . . Pigaro! A Barnyard Musical," which premieres Saturday at the Falcon Theatre in Burbank. In the family comedy, writer Meryl Friedman spotlights a piglet who wants to escape from her dull, dirty pen and find a pretty place for herself in the world. She does it to the tune of opera, which annoys the heck out of the other farm animals.
NEWS
January 22, 2004 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
Hans Christian Andersen's rather haunting fairy tale classic "Thumbelina" is given a sunny island makeover at the Falcon Theatre, where the thumb-sized girl has grown up to be normal-sized -- if petite -- with a penchant for gardening. A misunderstanding sets the diminutive heroine (played by perky Natalie Lander) on a hurried search for a husband because she thinks a potential employer prefers married employees.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2012 | By Philip Brandes
For a floundering screenwriter and deadbeat dad, the unexpected appearance of the daughter he abandoned 16 years earlier spells screwball trouble - albeit fewer surprises than one might hope for - in Neil Simon's “I Ought to Be in Pictures” at the Falcon Theatre. This revival of Simon's 1980 comedy-drama features Robert Wuhl as Herb Tucker, one of the playwright's prototypical protagonists: an acerbic, narcissistic man-child and transplanted New Yorker who waxes poetic about the scarcity of good deli food in L.A. Having successfully evaded commitment to his undemanding and level-headed girlfriend (Kelly Hare)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2012 | By Philip Brandes
For a floundering screenwriter and deadbeat dad, the unexpected appearance of the daughter he abandoned 16 years earlier spells screwball trouble - albeit fewer surprises than one might hope for - in Neil Simon's “I Ought to Be in Pictures” at the Falcon Theatre. This revival of Simon's 1980 comedy-drama features Robert Wuhl as Herb Tucker, one of the playwright's prototypical protagonists: an acerbic, narcissistic man-child and transplanted New Yorker who waxes poetic about the scarcity of good deli food in L.A. Having successfully evaded commitment to his undemanding and level-headed girlfriend (Kelly Hare)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2012 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Melanie Griffith returns to the spotlight as a young man's dysfunctional mother in "No Way Around but Through," a new play written by and starring Scott Caan, which runs through July 8 at the Falcon Theatre in Burbank. You play a very different kind of role from the sweet, girlish characters you're famous for. Your character is jaded, steely, a bit of a monster. I don't know if she's really that much of a monster. I think she's a monster in his [her son's ] mind. You know, kids that don't want to be doing what they're supposed to do, like grow up. But yeah, I guess she's a monster in a way, but I've been through stuff like that with my kids.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2008 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
With equal parts iambic pentameter and impish pandemonium, "As U2 Like It" hits the Falcon Theatre. But as brazen and Bono-driven as it gets, this entrancing Troubadour Theater Company riff on Shakespeare's gender-bent trek through the Forest of Arden honors its source more enjoyably than many a legit reading. The time-honored Troubie tactics -- Brechtian comment, commedia abandon, topical groaners -- are in place. Charles the wrestler (Dan Waskom) is a stilt-walking behemoth. Musical director Eric Heinly's rocking band wears Robin Hood hats.
NEWS
October 11, 2007 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
There's no reason a theater company can't take liberties with a classic fairy tale, add some laughs and zingers. It happens all the time. But at the Falcon Theatre in Burbank, a lamentably shallow script sinks the message of redemption in "The Enchanted Nightingale," based on Hans Christian Andersen's bittersweet tale about a greedy emperor humbled by a little songbird.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2007 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
A star vehicle as engaging as it is thematically pointed, Jeffrey Sweet's "The Value of Names" has the kind of dream roles that have attracted name performers ever since it was first mounted in 1983. The current incarnation at the Falcon Theatre stars Jack Klugman, who has performed in several previous productions of the play with his costars, Dan Lauria and Liz Larsen. Lauria also directs the Falcon staging, with original direction credited to James Glossman.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2006 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
AN empress with a yen for fashion design travels incognito to Paris as a finalist in a "Passion for Fashion" contest. Will she trump the competition with her MGM musical-inspired designs, or will she fall for the old "invisible" fabric trick? With echoes of Bravo's "Project Runway" reality show, the Falcon Theatre's latest musical offering for children, "The Empress and Her New Clothes," spins a familiar fairy tale into an uneven romp needing ample restitching but lands laughs nonetheless.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1999 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Outre in its day, Joseph Kesselring's 1940 comedy "Arsenic and Old Lace" maintains a degree of charm, though its gothic quirkiness seems mild today. All the same, William Bickley's solid staging at the Falcon Theatre shores up the creaky plot. Cary Grant's screwball portrayal of Mortimer Brewster in Frank Capra's 1944 film looms ineradicably in the memory. Lacking Grant's suavity, Shaun O'Hagan brings a raw-boned physicality to the role that gibes well with its slapstick requirements.
NEWS
April 10, 2003
The Falcon Theatre reaps the fruits of seeds planted more than five years ago with the Los Angeles premiere Saturday of John Belluso's "Gretty Good Time," a play workshopped at the Falcon in 1997 through the Mark Taper Forum's Writer's Lab program. "Gretty" centers on a paralyzed and suicidal woman, played at the Falcon by Pamela Gordon, who escapes her frustration in a world of fantasy. Belluso has a rare bone disorder that limits muscle strength but is not paralyzing or life-threatening.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2004 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
Salty mixed with sweet can be a savory combination, as long as you go easy on the sugar. "Wrong Turn at Lungfish" at the Falcon Theatre has plenty of tasteful bite but occasionally lapses into syrupy sentimentality. Fortunately, a crack cast, led by Garry Marshall, who co-wrote the play with veteran screenwriter Lowell Ganz ("Splash," "Parenthood"), manipulates what could have been a gelatinous confection to a pleasingly brittle consistency. The play, which starred George C.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 2004 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
Four elderly golfers meet for a Sunday round of golf and a metaphysical exploration of life's big questions -- including the fate of a famous lunar golf shot -- in "Golf With Alan Shepard," Carter W. Lewis' comedy at the Falcon Theatre. As they insult and chaff each other from hole to hole, death and loss are on the minds of these old-timers, played by some terrific veterans: octogenarians Jack Klugman and Charles Durning, septuagenarian Paul Dooley and junior member Granville Van Dusen, age 60.
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