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ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2009 | Betsy Sharkey, FILM CRITIC
Just when we've been lulled into thinking a car is just a car and a plane is just a plane, the metal monstrosities of Cybertron are back in "Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen." Where once only 14 robots bone-crushed our world and each other, now there are 46 of them on the prowl, morphing out of microwaves, motorcycles, fighter jets and more as they ready for a screeching showdown of titanic proportions in director Michael Bay's latest extravaganza of alloyed excess.
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NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
The Los Angeles Police Department unveiled a memorial star Friday to honor fallen LAPD Officer Nicholas Lee. Lee's family, including his mother and brother, attended the service unveiling the star at the entrance to the LAPD Hollywood Division at 1358 North Wilcox Ave. LAPD officers from around the city came for the memorial. Lee was killed on March 7 when his patrol car was hit by a dump truck. Lee's is the eighth star at the Hollywood Division memorializing Hollywood LAPD officers killed in the line of duty.
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NATIONAL
April 13, 2009
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Hailey Branson-Potts, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Hundreds of uniformed police officers gathered in downtown Los Angeles early Tuesday to pay their final respects to a veteran LAPD motorcycle officer who died earlier this month after being struck by a driver suspected of being under the influence of cocaine. A 26-year veteran of the LAPD, Christopher Cortijo, 51, had been assigned to the Valley Traffic Division when he was struck from behind on April 5 by an SUV. At a funeral Mass at the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, colleagues remembered him as a man who so cherished his role as a motorcycle cop that he wore a leather motorcycle jacket even in the soaring San Fernando Valley heat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 2009
OPINION
May 31, 2010
Verses for the fallen On Memorial Day, we honor those who have died in defense of the nation. To express our gratitude, we offer these words from poets Siegfried Sassoon, who wrote from the trenches in World War I, and Ralph Waldo Emerson, whose famous ode to patriots of the American Revolution has become a staple of this holiday. I stood with the Dead, so forsaken and still: When dawn was grey I stood with the dead. And my slow heart said, 'You must kill, you must kill: 'Soldier, soldier, morning is red.' On the shapes of the slain in their crumpled disgrace I stared for a while in the thin cold rain… 'O lad that I loved, there is rain on your face, 'And your eyes are blurred and sick like the plain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2009
NATIONAL
August 2, 2009
OPINION
September 7, 2003
Re "Medical Schools Losing Allure," Sept. 5: Your article gives lots of reasons [why applications to medical schools have fallen] but misses the big one. Why would anyone want all those lawyers hounding them? Waugh Smith Los Angeles
SPORTS
August 18, 2002
"We may be on the dance floor, but we can't hear the music right now." Frank Robinson, manager of the Montreal Expos, who have fallen off the pace in the NL wild-card race.
SPORTS
April 2, 2014 | By Broderick Turner
PHOENIX - Jared Dudley had started the first 29 regular-season games for the Clippers, struggling to find his way before eventually losing his small forward position to Matt Barnes on Jan. 20 at Detroit. Now Dudley is in the midst of just trying to get some playing time, but even with limited minutes, he hasn't complained. "You just got to stay ready," Dudley said. "I just think my game is suited for the playoffs. When you have two or three days to prepare for a guy, you know what you're going to get from me. " Things got worse for Dudley when the Clippers signed free-agent Danny Granger, who just happened to play the same small forward position as Dudley.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Matt Taibbi begins his sixth book, "The Divide: American Injustice in the Age of the Wealth Gap," with a simple formulation: "Poverty goes up; Crime goes down; Prison population doubles. " It's a snapshot, a way to represent what Taibbi sees as the through-the-looking-glass reality of contemporary America, where rule of law has been subverted by, on the one hand, corporate greed and, on the other, a kind of institutionalized abuse of the poor. Such a landscape, he suggests, brings to mind the last days of the Soviet Union, which operated out of a similar sort of mass hypocrisy until, in 1990 and '91, "people were permitted to think about all this and question the unwritten rules out loud, [and]
NATIONAL
March 7, 2014 | By Mark Z. Barabak
DES MOINES - For more than 40 years, Iowa voters have played a vital role in picking the nation's president, culling the field of hopefuls and helping launch a fortunate handful all the way to the White House. For about 35 of those years, Iowa has been the target of jealousy and scorn, mainly from outsiders who say the state, the first to vote in the presidential contest, is too white and too rural; that its caucuses, precinct-level meetings of party faithful, are too quirky and too exclusionary to play such a key role in the nominating process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 2014 | Sandy Banks
Jill Ellman was only 8, but she remembers military officials heading up the driveway and knocking on her family's door with the news that her father's Air Force bomber had crashed off the coast of Newfoundland. The news had barely sunk in when the telephone rang with an update: Her father was safe. Her mother broke out a bottle of champagne. "Everyone was celebrating," Ellman recalled. But a few hours later the phone rang again, and the celebrating stopped. Only one crew member had been pulled from the ocean, and it wasn't her dad. Searchers discovered an empty life raft, but never found her father.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2014 | By Laura J. Nelson
Fare evasion along the Metro Orange Line has fallen significantly since law enforcement began a more aggressive campaign to check passengers' fares and issue citations and warnings, authorities said Tuesday.  The ratio of passengers riding the San Fernando Valley busway for free fell to 7% and ticket misuse fell to 5% after more Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department deputies began checking fares and doing it more frequently, officials said at...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2014 | Steve Lopez
Anthony Navarro worked with solemn purpose and a box of tools, stripping the old discarded bicycle of its gear shifts, brakes and chain. He cut his finger, wiped a drop of blood on his pants and kept going. "It helps me with my anger when I'm doing it," said Navarro. "It brings me some kind of inner peace. " On Thanksgiving Day 2011, Navarro's 6-year-old son, Anthony, was riding his bicycle in front of the family's Oxnard home when he was struck by a pickup truck. "The moment I saw him, I knew he was gone," said Navarro, who reeled under the weight of sudden, unbearable loss.
IMAGE
February 17, 2008
Gap stock price: A Feb. 10 article on the Gap's new head of design, Patrick Robinson, said that the price of the retailer's stock had fallen more than 50%, to $18.17, the week the story was written. In fact, the stock price had fallen more than 50% from early 2000 to Feb. 5, 2008, when the price was $18.17.
SPORTS
February 5, 2014 | By Philip Hersh
There was an evening at the recent U.S. Figure Skating Championships in Boston when it felt like a time warp. The crowd for the Saturday night women's final, the marquee event at the nationals, made the big arena feel full. Even though the 13,980 in attendance fell about 3,000 short of the TD Garden capacity, it was the largest single-session crowd at the nationals since the 18,035 in Los Angeles for the women's final in 2002. TV ratings were up more than 20% over last year. "I feel skating is poised to make a huge comeback," 1992 Olympic silver medalist Paul Wylie said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2013 | Richard Winton and Joseph Serna
Los Angeles recorded another large drop in homicides in 2013, and nowhere has the trend been more pronounced than in the San Fernando Valley. The Valley had 40 homicides this year, dropping 35% from 2012 -- the biggest decline of any region in the city. As recently as 2006, the region recorded 87 homicides. When it comes to falling crime, much of the focus has been on traditionally high-crime areas like South L.A. and the Eastside. But police officials and community leaders say the decline in violence in tough parts of the Valley, notably Pacoima, Lakeview Terrace, Sun Valley and Sylmar, has also been striking.
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