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False Advertising Suits

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BUSINESS
July 16, 1994 | JOHN O'DELL and CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Weight-loss center operator Jenny Craig Inc. has agreed to pay $10 million in cash and give away merchandise worth $36 million at retail prices to settle a 4-year-old lawsuit alleging misleading advertising and improper business practices. Though Jenny Craig is based in Del Mar, the class action suit on behalf of 360,000 of its clients was filed in Orange County Superior Court in 1990. It alleged that the company's diets could cause gallbladder disease.
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BUSINESS
November 30, 2007 | Alana Semuels, Times Staff Writer
The next battle in the Splenda wars is about to begin. A hearing in a false-advertising lawsuit against the company that makes the sweetener is scheduled for Monday in federal court in Los Angeles. Filed by five U.S. sugar companies, the suit claims McNeil Nutritionals has deliberately misled consumers with its "made from sugar, tastes like sugar" advertising campaign. "We believe it is manipulation on an important subject," said Dan Callister, a lawyer for the Sugar Assn. Inc.
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BUSINESS
July 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Terms of Jenny Craig Settlement Signed: Weight-loss center operator Jenny Craig Inc. has agreed to pay $10 million in cash and give away merchandise worth $36 million at retail to settle a 4-year-old lawsuit alleging misleading advertising and improper business practices. Although Jenny Craig is headquartered in Del Mar, Calif., the class-action suit, filed on behalf of 360,000 of its weight-loss clients, was filed in Orange County Superior Court in Santa Ana in 1990.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2004 | Julie Tamaki, Times Staff Writer
A federal jury teed off on Dunlop Slazenger on Thursday, awarding $2.2 million to rival Callaway Golf Co. in a dispute over whose golf ball goes farthest. Dunlop Slazenger Group Americas Inc. began using the slogan "The Longest Ball on Tour" for its Maxfli A-10 in 2001. Callaway sued, arguing that the claim was demonstrably false based on Dunlop's own internal testing of the A-10 versus Callaway's CTU 30 and HX golf balls. Callaway sought $1.
BUSINESS
September 6, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Federal Trade Commission is suing former baseball player Steve Garvey for acting as host of a diet-drug advertisement that federal regulators contend was deceptive. The suit, filed last month, builds on an April suit that alleged Enforma Natural Products Inc. and two of its principals, Andrew Grey and Fred Zinos, made "false and unsubstantiated" claims about "The Enforma System."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1986 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
The owners of two car dealerships agreed Tuesday to pay $32,000 to settle a state attorney general's lawsuit alleging that they misled customers in Van Nuys and Orange County through false advertising. Jim Smathers and Marvin Smith, who own Performance Lincoln-Mercury in Van Nuys and Cypress Nissan/Datsun in Cypress, agreed to pay the state $25,000 in civil penalties and $7,000 in attorneys' fees and costs to settle the suit, which accused them of violations at both dealerships.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1985
A U.S. District Court judge ruled that Hertz Corp., a unit of RCA, violated federal laws against false advertising with a claim in an ad that "Hertz has more new cars than Avis has cars." The court found that Avis, a unit of Beatrice Cos., in fact had 13,000 more cars in its fleet than Hertz had "new" cars. The court scheduled a hearing to assess damages. Hertz said it would appeal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1986 | MAYERENE BARKER and DOROTHY TOWNSEND, Times Staff Writers
A group of Canoga Park mail-order companies marketing a Japanese "super pill," billed as being able to flush calories from the body without dieting, agreed Thursday to pay $500,000 as part of an out-of-court settlement in a civil lawsuit that accused the firm of false and misleading advertising. The settlement stemmed from a complaint filed in Los Angeles Superior Court in November by the district attorney's consumer protection division.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2004 | Julie Tamaki, Times Staff Writer
A federal jury teed off on Dunlop Slazenger on Thursday, awarding $2.2 million to rival Callaway Golf Co. in a dispute over whose golf ball goes farthest. Dunlop Slazenger Group Americas Inc. began using the slogan "The Longest Ball on Tour" for its Maxfli A-10 in 2001. Callaway sued, arguing that the claim was demonstrably false based on Dunlop's own internal testing of the A-10 versus Callaway's CTU 30 and HX golf balls. Callaway sought $1.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2007 | Alana Semuels, Times Staff Writer
The next battle in the Splenda wars is about to begin. A hearing in a false-advertising lawsuit against the company that makes the sweetener is scheduled for Monday in federal court in Los Angeles. Filed by five U.S. sugar companies, the suit claims McNeil Nutritionals has deliberately misled consumers with its "made from sugar, tastes like sugar" advertising campaign. "We believe it is manipulation on an important subject," said Dan Callister, a lawyer for the Sugar Assn. Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2002 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Former baseball star Steve Garvey did not engage in false advertising when he claimed a weight-loss product would work even if consumers ate "forbidden foods" such as buttered biscuits and ribs, a federal judge ruled. U.S. District Judge Gary A. Feess ruled in Garvey's favor in a $1.1-million lawsuit brought by the Federal Trade Commission.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1994 | JOHN O'DELL and CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Weight-loss center operator Jenny Craig Inc. has agreed to pay $10 million in cash and give away merchandise worth $36 million at retail prices to settle a 4-year-old lawsuit alleging misleading advertising and improper business practices. Though Jenny Craig is based in Del Mar, the class action suit on behalf of 360,000 of its clients was filed in Orange County Superior Court in 1990. It alleged that the company's diets could cause gallbladder disease.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Terms of Jenny Craig Settlement Signed: Weight-loss center operator Jenny Craig Inc. has agreed to pay $10 million in cash and give away merchandise worth $36 million at retail to settle a 4-year-old lawsuit alleging misleading advertising and improper business practices. Although Jenny Craig is headquartered in Del Mar, Calif., the class-action suit, filed on behalf of 360,000 of its weight-loss clients, was filed in Orange County Superior Court in Santa Ana in 1990.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1986 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
The owners of two car dealerships agreed Tuesday to pay $32,000 to settle a state attorney general's lawsuit alleging that they misled customers in Van Nuys and Orange County through false advertising. Jim Smathers and Marvin Smith, who own Performance Lincoln-Mercury in Van Nuys and Cypress Nissan/Datsun in Cypress, agreed to pay the state $25,000 in civil penalties and $7,000 in attorneys' fees and costs to settle the suit, which accused them of violations at both dealerships.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1986 | MAYERENE BARKER and DOROTHY TOWNSEND, Times Staff Writers
A group of Canoga Park mail-order companies marketing a Japanese "super pill," billed as being able to flush calories from the body without dieting, agreed Thursday to pay $500,000 as part of an out-of-court settlement in a civil lawsuit that accused the firm of false and misleading advertising. The settlement stemmed from a complaint filed in Los Angeles Superior Court in November by the district attorney's consumer protection division.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1985
A U.S. District Court judge ruled that Hertz Corp., a unit of RCA, violated federal laws against false advertising with a claim in an ad that "Hertz has more new cars than Avis has cars." The court found that Avis, a unit of Beatrice Cos., in fact had 13,000 more cars in its fleet than Hertz had "new" cars. The court scheduled a hearing to assess damages. Hertz said it would appeal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1993 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pop star Paula Abdul is the only person singing lead vocals on her 10-million-selling debut album "Forever Your Girl," a Los Angeles jury concluded Thursday. The ruling closes the book on a two-year music industry spectacle that erupted after background singer Yvette Marine filed a multimillion-dollar "false and deceptive packaging" lawsuit against Virgin Records, Abdul's record company, claiming she was an uncredited co-lead vocalist on at least two songs of the smash 1988 album.
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