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False Claims

NEWS
September 17, 1986 | JOHN DREYFUSS, Times Staff Writer
Sen. Jacob Howard (R-Mich.), his florid complexion set off by a thick thatch of black hair, rose in Senate chambers and spoke in his typically precise though ponderous manner. The senator was indignant. "Persons have been employed to furnish shells for the use of the Army; and in several cases, it has turned out that these shells have been filled not with the proper explosive materials for use, but with sawdust!" Howard also complained that "frauds of a very gross character have . . .
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2006 | Greg Krikorian, Times Staff Writer
A federal grand jury in Los Angeles has indicted two men in separate cases on charges that they falsely accused associates of planning terrorist acts in the United States. Juan Peter Delgado, 33, of Los Angeles was arrested Thursday morning by FBI agents for allegedly making a false threat two years ago that methamphetamine had been placed in Arrowhead bottled water by an employee of the company. The hoax, according to the U.S.
NEWS
May 26, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg
Kevin Costner, James Garner, Johnny Depp, James Earl Jones, Chuck Norris, Cameron Diaz. You guessed it (no, you probably did not). This is a partial roster of the people included in Wikipedia's “List of People of Self-Identified Cherokee Ancestry,” which, inexplicably, does not include Elizabeth Warren. Yet. Warren's candidacy for Senate in Massachusetts took a bizarre (left? right?) turn in the past week when it was revealed that she had claimed, without apparent proof, to have Cherokee ancestry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1999 | From a Times Staff Writer
A woman who claimed that Assistant Sheriff George Jaramillo insinuated she could pay off a legal bill by granting him sexual favors has withdrawn her allegations. Deborah J. Hegel of San Clemente apologized in court documents for filing false claims, which she said she made in response to vigorous attempts by Jaramillo's law firm to recover $4,764.69 in unpaid legal bills. "Mr.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Computer Sciences Corp., the manager of networks for NASA and the Navy, agreed to pay $1.4 million to settle U.S. allegations that it solicited improper payments in connection with government contracts. The El Segundo-based company received the kickbacks from other companies with which it had business relationships, the Justice Department alleged. The civil case was first brought by whistle-blowers who will receive a share of the settlement, the government said. Computer Sciences spokesman Mike Dickerson said, "We can confirm that we have settled this matter, but we emphatically deny that CSC engaged in any false claims or other wrongdoing in association with this case."
BUSINESS
February 2, 2000 | VIVIEN LOU CHEN, BLOOMBERG NEWS
The state attorney general's office is investigating a whistle-blower's claim that IBM Corp., Toshiba Corp. and other computer makers hid a defect in personal computers sold to local governments, people familiar with the case said. The probe was prompted by a whistle-blower lawsuit by former IBM engineer Phillip Adams. The companies are accused of concealing a problem in floppy disk controllers that can corrupt data, the people said. Toshiba on Monday won a federal judge's approval of a $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1991 | JOHN RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four employees of a Valencia firm were charged Thursday with perpetrating a $7.2-million Medi-Cal scam that involved using the names of thousands of aid recipients, the state attorney general's office said. Eliseo Sur of Granada Hills, Macario Tiu Sr. of Valencia, Carol Dunbar of Newhall and Lisa Cabuntala of Los Angeles were arraigned in Los Angeles Municipal Court on charges of taking part in the alleged fraud while they worked at Bruce Pharmacal Inc.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1997 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Laguna Niguel man, convicted nearly three years ago of defrauding investors of $1.8 million, has admitted in an unrelated case that he collected nearly $300,000 from the government by filing false claims for tax refunds. Randall Craig Hutchens, 43, used the names and Social Security numbers of nine adults to fabricate W-2 forms and file fraudulent refund claims for the 1995 tax year, according to Assistant U.S. Atty. Gregory Weingart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2014 | Steve Lopez
In Los Angeles, patrol officers are caught disabling recording equipment that was in place to keep them honest. In Santa Monica, a high school student demonstrates why the wrestling coach is the last faculty member to mess with. And in Glendale, a young woman challenges the definition of "hands-free" driving after getting a ticket for talking on a phone tucked into her head scarf. These three police blotter tales have little in common, except that I've assembled them in a nice spring bouquet, along with a prickly observation or two. First the LAPD.
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