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False Teeth

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NEWS
September 1, 1987 | From Reuters
The two children of John D. Rockefeller's most favored granddaughter went to court today to overturn a will in which she left millions to a husband almost half her age. The children of Margaret de Cuevas, who died in 1985 at the age of 88 in Madrid, say she was not of sound mind when she left her fortune estimated at between $16 million and $60 million to her second husband, Raymundo de Larrain, now 52.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
November 22, 2012 | By Michelle Huneven
On Thanksgiving Day, nine years ago, I stole my father's car. He was 88 years old and living in a retirement community in Ojai. The previous July, he'd failed his driver's test, but he'd kept driving without a license - and therefore, without insurance. Perhaps he had forgotten that he didn't have a license, or perhaps he didn't care, but something had to be done. On Thanksgiving morning, I drove up to fetch him for a turkey dinner in Pasadena, and while he finished getting ready, I appropriated his spare car keys.
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BUSINESS
January 6, 1999 | Bloomberg News
The Justice Department accused the nation's leading maker of false teeth of illegally maintaining a monopoly by coercing distributors to not sell products of its competitors. The antitrust suit filed in federal court in Wilmington, Del., said Dentsply International Inc. enforced restrictive arrangements affecting more than 80% of U.S. distributors. York, Pa.-based Dentsply sells about 70% of the artificial teeth used in the U.S.
NEWS
July 29, 2010 | Reuters
LONDON -- A partial set of British wartime Prime Minister Winston Churchill's gold-mounted dentures has fetched 15,200 pounds ($23,770) at auction, over three times the estimate. The false teeth, specially designed to disguise Churchill's lisp, were sold by the son of the technician who was commissioned to make them. They had been expected to make a maximum of 5,000 pounds at Thursday's sale by Keys auctioneer. "The atmosphere was electric," said a Keys' spokesman.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | ROY RIVENBURG
Cheerful Giving Bureau: Some theologians believe that God repays acts of charity tenfold. Others say a hundredfold. Either way, we're curious to see the return on investment for several English churchgoers. In a survey published by Ship-of-Fools.com, British clergy were asked to name the weirdest object they'd ever found in a church collection plate. Their answers: a pair of false teeth, a woman's shoe, a cigarette lighter, a condom, a hearing aid . . . and money.
OPINION
November 22, 2012 | By Michelle Huneven
On Thanksgiving Day, nine years ago, I stole my father's car. He was 88 years old and living in a retirement community in Ojai. The previous July, he'd failed his driver's test, but he'd kept driving without a license - and therefore, without insurance. Perhaps he had forgotten that he didn't have a license, or perhaps he didn't care, but something had to be done. On Thanksgiving morning, I drove up to fetch him for a turkey dinner in Pasadena, and while he finished getting ready, I appropriated his spare car keys.
HEALTH
August 20, 2007 | Elena Conis, Special to The Times
Despite daily brushing, George Washington lost all but one of his teeth by the time he became president. He went through at least six sets of dentures over his lifetime, although they weren't, as legend has it, made of wood. Until the 20th century, false teeth were often made from gold, pearl or agate; hippo, walrus or elephant tusks; ox or cattle bones; or teeth pulled from cows, horses, donkeys -- or human corpses.
BOOKS
March 26, 1995 | Joanna Scott, (Joanna Scott's most recent book is a collection of stories, "Various Antidotes." Henry Holt will publish her new novel, "The Manikin," in 1996.)
As a young child, I had an interest in false teeth, and my immodest Granny obliged me whenever she came to visit, calling me to her side before a meal so I could watch her put in her dentures and summoning me later for the ritual of removal. Sometimes I would sneak into her room when she was out and take a long, quiet look at the set of teeth submerged in a jelly glass full of mouthwash. Of course, I had no desire to touch the teeth.
HEALTH
March 22, 1999 | KORKY VANN, HARTFORD COURANT
Dr. Robert Zeoli looks the subject of dentures square in the mouth on a daily basis. As director of the geriatric-dental clinic at McSweeny Senior Center in Willimantic, Conn., he finds that almost half of his patients have or need dentures, bridges or other tooth replacements. His patients range in age from 60 to over 100. For many in that age group, he says, dentures and bridgework were as inevitable as gray hairs and wrinkles.
NEWS
May 17, 1994 | KATHLEEN O. RYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After a year of wearing braces, Bill Bates was ready to get those puppies off. He had spent all of 1991 sporting the latest hip-colored elastic ligatures on his braces--red, white and blue in support of U.S. troops in Operation Desert Storm. Now it was time to take off the tinsel--braces that had taken him five years to get after finally convincing Scott Bates that he was dead serious about having his teeth straightened. Why the tough sell? Bill, at the time, was a 75-year-old retiree.
SPORTS
September 20, 2007 | Chris Foster, Times Staff Writer
Brandon Breazell was the one player putting some bite into the UCLA offense last week. Sinking his teeth into a hamburger, well, that can be biting off more than he can chew. That Breazell, a senior, continues to play, and produce, for the Bruins is more than just the marvels of modern dentistry. It also involves some intestinal fortitude that the Bruins can only hope is contagious.
HEALTH
August 20, 2007 | Elena Conis, Special to The Times
Despite daily brushing, George Washington lost all but one of his teeth by the time he became president. He went through at least six sets of dentures over his lifetime, although they weren't, as legend has it, made of wood. Until the 20th century, false teeth were often made from gold, pearl or agate; hippo, walrus or elephant tusks; ox or cattle bones; or teeth pulled from cows, horses, donkeys -- or human corpses.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2005 | From Associated Press
The leading U.S. denture maker must end a practice that has prevented other companies from boosting their market shares, a court ruled. A three-judge panel of the U.S. 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals in Philadelphia said that Dentsply International Inc. of York, Pa., had improperly stifled competition for more than a decade by requiring its dealers to sign exclusive sales agreements.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2002 | Steve Harvey
Under the heading "Only in Hollywood," the LAPD's Blue Line publication relates that a suspected burglar bit his victim, then fled in a stolen car. But he left one piece of evidence behind: his false teeth. Officers noticed a name and serial number inscribed on the dentures. "An inquiry in the computer system revealed the number was, in fact, a California Department of Corrections ID number," Blue Line said. The suspect was an ex-con. The defanged suspect topped off his day by crashing into a signpost while being chased by other officers, who captured him. Moral of the story: If you're going to bite a victim's arm, use a pair of unmarked false teeth.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | ROY RIVENBURG
Cheerful Giving Bureau: Some theologians believe that God repays acts of charity tenfold. Others say a hundredfold. Either way, we're curious to see the return on investment for several English churchgoers. In a survey published by Ship-of-Fools.com, British clergy were asked to name the weirdest object they'd ever found in a church collection plate. Their answers: a pair of false teeth, a woman's shoe, a cigarette lighter, a condom, a hearing aid . . . and money.
HEALTH
March 22, 1999 | KORKY VANN, HARTFORD COURANT
Dr. Robert Zeoli looks the subject of dentures square in the mouth on a daily basis. As director of the geriatric-dental clinic at McSweeny Senior Center in Willimantic, Conn., he finds that almost half of his patients have or need dentures, bridges or other tooth replacements. His patients range in age from 60 to over 100. For many in that age group, he says, dentures and bridgework were as inevitable as gray hairs and wrinkles.
NEWS
March 14, 1987 | From Reuters
Bruce Taylor opened a new tin of coffee at work this week and found a set of false teeth inside. "The teeth probably fell in when the coffee was packed. I doubt whether anyone is looking for them--they don't look too healthy," he said. Undeterred by his discovery, Taylor made two cups of coffee, but "my colleagues were disgusted with me. None of them would have a cup."
NEWS
October 10, 1993 | Associated Press
Prison guards wondered why an inmate seemed high on drugs after each visit from his grandmother. So they had the police search the 81-year-old woman the next time she called on her grandson. They checked her clothes, her handbag and her personal possessions without finding illegal drugs, according to newspaper reports Friday. One narcotics officer was still not convinced and demanded that she spit out her false teeth.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1999 | Bloomberg News
The Justice Department accused the nation's leading maker of false teeth of illegally maintaining a monopoly by coercing distributors to not sell products of its competitors. The antitrust suit filed in federal court in Wilmington, Del., said Dentsply International Inc. enforced restrictive arrangements affecting more than 80% of U.S. distributors. York, Pa.-based Dentsply sells about 70% of the artificial teeth used in the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1997 | JERRY HICKS
When Doris Walker moved to Dana Point from Chicago following a job transfer in 1963, it was like going from a metropolis to "a wilderness," she said. But a breathtakingly beautiful wilderness. A few years later, she would take her two sons on picnics by the ocean's edge to watch the building of Dana Point Harbor. Walker, a professional writer, thought someone ought to chronicle all the changes taking place in her part of Orange County. So she did it herself.
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