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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2008 | Nicky Loomis, Times Staff Writer
Though camp is officially over, Sydni Swayzer still remembers everything about it, down to her favorite meals (ravioli and corn dogs), the music she listened to (Miley Cyrus and the Jonas Brothers) and, most important, the smells of nature. "Some of the trees smell like butterscotch -- they smell really good," said Sydni, 8, who, while at camp a few weeks ago, learned how trees get energy from the sun and produce oxygen.
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BUSINESS
March 8, 2013 | By Kenneth R. Harney
WASHINGTON - Could rental houses owned and managed by deep-pocketed hedge funds and big investors be the post-bust steppingstones to homeownership for huge numbers of renters? Could they also provide a form of safe harbor or sanctuary for thousands of families who were displaced by financial difficulties from their previous homes through foreclosures or short sales? A new national study suggests that the answer to both questions is yes. Over the last five years, according to Wall Street analysts' estimates, between $7 billion and $9 billion worth of distressed single-family homes have been purchased and converted to rentals by institutional investors such as hedge funds, private partnerships of high-net-worth individuals and even pools of capital raised among investors in foreign countries.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1998
Applications are available for senior citizen and family apartments in a community that is sprouting up where an abandoned high-rise was razed last year. Lark Ellen Village, with a community center, pool and recreation facility, will open in July on the site formerly occupied by the decaying Lark Ellen Towers. It will provide 122 apartments and townhouses, available for rent to senior citizens and families with low to moderate incomes, officials said.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Lisa Boone
Craig Ehrlich didn't particularly want a modern house. But everything he valued - light, air, indoor-outdoor living, sustainable building materials - has led to this: a recently completed 1,150-square-foot house in Santa Monica that feels much larger thanks to its modern sculptural design. With its exterior wood screens and expanses of glass, the house is immediately intriguing, but the interior elements - the geometric cutouts in the architecture and the dynamic double-height spaces - are what make the small house feel substantial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1998 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Allen Course, 35, knows all about the gap in affordable housing. He and his two children fell right through it last year, ending up homeless and on the street. The lowest point came when they were waiting for the doors to open at a shelter in Santa Monica, a worn red bag holding everything they owned. "A man drove by and a couple of minutes later he came back with a loaf of white bread and a package of sliced turkey.
OPINION
November 17, 2002
Mike Feuer is correct about the housing problem in Los Angeles, but he addressed only part of the problem in his Nov. 14 commentary, "L.A. Trust Fund Is a Good Foundation for Affordable Housing." So long as residents -- legal and illegal -- continue to propagate in an unthinking fashion, housing will never catch up to population. A $10-an-hour worker I met recently proudly told me that he has five children. I am sorry if they live in a garage, but it is difficult for me to work up much sympathy for their situation.
NEWS
November 25, 1988 | Clipboard researched by Susan Davis Greene and Rick VanderKnyff / Los Angeles Times
Although the number of new permits issued during September for multi-family dwellings almost doubled from the previous month, on a year-to-date basis 1988 is running 28% behind last year. Most notably, the unincorporated areas, Santa Ana, Anaheim and Laguna Beach lag well behind 1987's pace. At the other end, Tustin, San Clemente and Yorba Linda all are building at a faster pace. Here is how the county looks on a city-by-city basis, rendered from largest decrease to largest increase: Jan.-Sept.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Builders broke ground on fewer homes in May, due mostly to plummeting apartment construction, but requested the most permits since September 2008. Overall housing starts last month dropped 4.8% to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 708,000, but that's compared with April's 744,000 figure, which was revised up. Compared with May 2011, new construction is up 28.5%, according to the Commerce Department report . Initial work on multi-family housing, an erratic gauge which plunged 21.3% last month, was a drag on the overall measure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2011 | By Jessica Garrison and David Zahniser, Los Angeles Times
Three years ago, landlord John Callaghan was granted city permits to enlarge a South Los Angeles single family home, creating three apartments. But he didn't stop there. He crammed as many as 44 rental rooms into a warren of narrow hallways, tiny, shared bathrooms and communal kitchens. Now, as the holidays approach, dozens of renters who paid as much as $500 per unit are being ordered to vacate the burnt orange three-story complex, in a neighborhood about a mile from the Coliseum.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2011 | By Nicole Santa Cruz, Los Angeles Times
This orchard used to be the stuff Orange County was made of. Back in the heyday of the region's citrus production, this five-acre parcel of orange trees in Santa Ana was no aberration. Indeed, at one point, the county boasted more than 67,000 acres of orange groves. Pushed by urban development over the years, the county's groves have been whittled down to scant plots of land, with perhaps fewer than 80 acres left. The Sexlinger Orchard, which borders a park and sits across Santa Clara Avenue from a cemetery, has managed to remain untouched.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2009 | Cathleen Decker
From her home in the high reaches of La Crescenta, Jackie Genofile watched last week as hillsides so recently denuded by fire, and so ripe for collapse, bore the new insult of rain. County officials had cleared debris basins at the foot of canyons. Residents had rigged sandbag-and-chipboard contraptions to block a slide, like burglar bars against nature's intrusion. All that was left was to wait. "Everyone was pretty panicky," Jackie said. "I was a little concerned. I kept waiting and saying, 'OK, if it gets rough, I'll just get in the car and leave.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2009 | Paloma Esquivel
A former prison guard accused of fatally shooting a 60-year-old man while holding him and his family hostage was charged Monday with murder, attempted murder and aggravated assault, prosecutors said. According to authorities, Alwyn Gibson II, 24, of Fairfield, Texas, was upset over a failed romantic relationship when he stormed the Irvine home of his ex-girlfriend's family.
HOME & GARDEN
November 22, 2008 | Morris Newman, Newman is a freelance writer.
Tucked on a packed street in Manhattan Beach, the home of Shaya and Grant Kirkpatrick is based on a classic idea in Southern California Modernism: the coexistence of the open and the enclosed. Open, in this case, means window-filled walls and light-filled rooms, with few visible structural supports. Some walls stop short of the ceiling, making visitors wonder what's holding up the house. Stairs jut out, seemingly suspended by invisible forces. Even bathrooms feel open.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2008 | Nicky Loomis, Times Staff Writer
Though camp is officially over, Sydni Swayzer still remembers everything about it, down to her favorite meals (ravioli and corn dogs), the music she listened to (Miley Cyrus and the Jonas Brothers) and, most important, the smells of nature. "Some of the trees smell like butterscotch -- they smell really good," said Sydni, 8, who, while at camp a few weeks ago, learned how trees get energy from the sun and produce oxygen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2008 | Martha Groves, Times Staff Writer
Paul and Sara Grisanti had only about an hour to load their cars with family photos and clothing before a Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department official ordered them to flee the Malibu fire zone Nov. 24. Their house in Corral Canyon, a mile from Pacific Coast Highway, burned to the ground, and the Grisantis contend that the fire could have been prevented had the state acted to secure an area known for late-night revelry.
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